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March 10, 1967 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-03-10

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PAGE TWO THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, MARCH 10, 1967

FILMS
First Festival Films
Lack Mood, Ingenuity

Hit Engin School Employment Procedures

By ANDREW LUGG
The Ann Arbor Film Festival
has reached the half-way stage.
During the past three days the
films have been mainly from new-
er artists. An exception to this was
Ion Popescu Gopo's "Steps To-
wards the Moon", a Rumanian
feature-length film which opened,
the festival. It is in strange com-,
pany since it was made with an
almost unlimited budget. The rest
of the films we have seen so far
were made on very low budgets.
Larry Jordan, a well established
artist, had his "Hamfat Asar"
screened Wednesday. His animated
engravings were beautifully and
painstakingly efected. Jordan won
a prize last year with his "Duo
Concertantes". However, the music
in "Duo" is far superior to that
of "Hamfat Asar," which is sort
of crypto-Latin American, and it
might be this which will rule Jor-
dan out of the prize money this
year..
The three films from the Speech
Department, "Mime", "Exposure"
and "Package" must all receive
adverse criticism. The film-makers
seemed rooted in the theatrical
traditions of the last century. The
scenes are all stagey, and conti-
nuity certainly is not approached
in any way acceptable to the film
medium. Relying on 'story' these
films have no thematic develop-
ment. The only thing distinguish-
ing the end from the beginning is
the time which had elapsed. To
say nothing requires style, too, and
it was this that was lacking.
"The Mime" starte well, but due
to Janes Onder and Ed Van
Cleef's concern with the exegesis
of plot, all the tension was lost.
The problem is one of not under-
standing the medium. If these
film-makers had seen and studied
Maya IDeren's films, and surely
they have not, they would have
known that this subject can be de-
veloped cinematically. If they had

seen a great many other films and
had been critical about them, they
would have known what to leave
out.
But this was the problem of the
"bigger" films as well. Clark Kent's
"The Romilar Movies" didn't live
up to the authors name. Shots of
tigers from Milwaukee just don't
work in the gangster movie. Like-
wise, Fred Meyer's "The Table"
lost all its tension with a three
minute postcript.
For the new people, it seems
there is a movement away from
the abstract towards. a new real-
ism. This realism increasingly
seems to rely on good acting, idea
and continuity between the vari-
ous phases of the action. Simply,
mood was missing in these films.
Walter Ungerer's "Meet Me, Je-
sus" had some consistency and
combined nicely the abstract and
the realistic. The raucous abstract
designs were balanced elegantly
against the usual avant-garde film
makers' "image" reportoire - the
pop symbols.
Peter Davis' "Strip" shows an
English film-maker still hung up
with documentary. The camera
work is controlled, however. Prob-
ing in and out of dressing rooms,
back stage and front stage, Davis
conjures up the tone of that mi-
lieu.
The remainder of the Festival
shows films by the more establish-
ed film-makers-Kling, Baillie,
Meyer, etc.
In addition, a special event has
been scheduled for Friday, 1:00
p.m., in the Architecture and De-
sign building-"The Longest Pan-
al in the World", a discussion on
"Film Art and Life" with a couple
of dozen panelists, including Rau-
schenberg and maybe Kaprow.

(Continued from Page 1)
to locate and place minority group
employes in its several operations
not only to assist in the broaden-
ing of its employment practices,
but also set a proper example and
image for the University and the
general public.
"2. The Central Personnel Of-
fice should establish a system of
greater control to determine what4
employment needs exist for non-
academic applicants in each de-
partment and to conduct broad
scale recruitment throughout the
major urban centers of the lower
Peninsula, in an effort to locate
satisfactory minority group appli-
cants.
"3. The academic departments
should establish, within their own
operations, means for contacting
minority group students and to en-
-courage them in training for all
levels of employment at the Uni-
versity.
"4. University advertising for
clerical personnel should be placed
in newspapers having a specific
minority group readership. As an
example, advertising should be
placed in the Wayne Dispatch
which circulates in the communi-
ties of Inkster and Nankin town-
ships.
"5. Personal contacts should be
established by representatives of
the Central Personnel Office and
others engaged in recruitment,
with Mr. Hamilton Vanzetti, pres-
ident of the NAACP, and Mrs.
Eaglin in the Negro community of
Ypsilanti.
"6. Personnel regulations and
procedures should be reviewed to
determine whether or not quali-
fied employes of the University
Medical Center might be upgraded
and transferred into suitable posi-
tions in other parts of the Uni-
versity.
"7. Specific efforts should be
made to recruit nonwhite employes

for the positions of resident direc-1
tor and resident advisor under the
Office of University Housing.
"8. Departments having no or
very few nonwhite clerical per-
sonnel should contact the Office
of Research Administration, in an
effort to discover their methods in
accomplishing an excellent job in
this area of employment.
"9. A crash program should be i
established immediately to improve
the exceptionally bad employment
practices which currently exist in1
the School of Engineering. All
personnel resources of the Uni-
versity should give temporary,
assistance to this deficient depart-
ment.
"10. A centralized effort should'
be made to contact Negro colleges,
national and local leaders, minor-
ity group fraternities, sororities
and professional societies, to ex-
press the concern of the University
in its search for minority group
academic personnel.
"11. Consider the establishment
of a University-wide training pro-
gram to qualify job applicants at
an entrance level for nonacademic
employment.
"12. Establish regular training
seminars for all University repre-
sentatives in personnel channels to
educate them in the problems and
techniques for conducting an
equal employment opportunity
program.
"13. Request the Ann Arbor of-
fice, Michigan Employment Se-
curity Commission, to make spe-
cial efforts in the recruitment of
minority group applicants for all
levels of employment.
"14. Establish a permanent rela-
tionship with the Detroit Board of
Education Skills Center for the re-
ferral of trained job applicants
and to establish specific training
EMU THEATRE
March 15-19
ANTON "EKHOV'$
Phone 434-0190
E Cnu on CARPENTER RA
OPEN 6:30 P.M. FIRST RUN
NOW SHOWING
a Shown at 7:15 & 10:25
BETME
~TORY0
NOT
for
children coor
Also-
Shown aTUSI)
Plus-"WATER COLOR HOLIDAY"
color cartoon

programs focused on the particu- as well as executing all other.ac-
lar needs for nonacademic per- tions required under the Equal
sonnel at any given time. Employment Opportunity policies
"15. Each department of the of the Boar dof Regents and the
University should be required to contractual commitments underI
develop a written plan of intended Executive Order 11246.
affirmative actions to improve its "The office should be directed
employment practices in the fiscal by a highly qualified specialist and
year 1967-68. These plans of af- he should be accountable to a Uni-
firmative action should be sub- versity officer not lower than a
mitted to the appropriate execu- vice president. The Director should
tive of the University for review 'be provided with sufficient staff
and critique. These plans will then and other support to accomplish
become a standard by which the the objectives of the Equal Em-
employment practices of each de- ployment Opportunity Program.
partment may be measured for This office should be established
progress in the succeeding period. with a life expectancy not short of
It is requested that these plans of five years. It is suggested further,
affirmative action be shared with that this office not only assume
the Contracts Compliance Office, responsibility for the implementa-
Department of Defense. tion of equal employment oppor-
"16. It is recommended very tunity, but those recommendations
strongly that an office of civil made to the University in the
rights be established at the Uni- compliance review conducted un-
versity immediately, to assume the der Title VI, U.S. Civil Rights Law,
responsibility for implementing and reported to the University on
the recommendations cited above, 4 August 1966."

lel
DELI HOUSE
Sunday, March 12,5:30 PM.
Visitation:
Student Members cf President's Commission on
DEC"ISION MAKING
Delicatessen Supper-$1, $1.25
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Sarah Miles
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