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March 08, 1967 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-03-08

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, MARCH S, 1967

PAGE TWO THE MICHIGAN DAILY WEDNESDAY, MARCH 8, 1967

'MIXED EMOTIONS':
Ford Imparts Views on CIA,
Rights Bill, Presidential Race

Rubinstein Plays Romantic
Piano in Sumptuous Style

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By MARK R. KILLINGSWORTH
House Minority Leader Gerald
R. Ford expressed "mixed emo-
tion" over whether private organi-
zations should have gotten covert
financing from the government.
He was interviewed Thursday after
a talk in connection with the Uni-
versity's Sesquicentennial celefra-
tion.
Mixed Emotions
Asked about recent disclosures
that the Central Intelligence
Agency had covertly subsidized
scores of private organizations, in-
cluding the National Student As-
sociation, Ford said he has "mix-
ed emotions about whether gov-
ernment subsidization should have
been done openly or covertly.
"If it had been done openly,
students from abroad would have
challenged the sincerity of United
States students," he said. "But
that's a little, paradoxical, since
I'm sure all the students from be-
hind the Iron Curtain were get-
ting government 'subsidies. It
would have been a case of the pot
calling the kettle black."
Ford, a member of the special
"watchdog" subcommittee of the
House Appropriations Committee
overseeing the CIA for eight years
before he became minority leader,
added that he had supported the
covert CIIA financing of private
organizations when the plans were
proposed to his subcommittee.
"I can't say that we ever got
into considering an alternative
way of financing "private organi-
zations," he said. "This was pri-
marily an executive branch deci-
sion-rightfully so."
But, Ford continued, now "I
wouldn't rule out" open financing
of such groups through the State
Department or the Department of
Health, Education and Welfare in
the wake of the CIA disclosures.
"In the current atmosphere there
might be more argument for it,"
he: said.
"Overall the CIA has done the
job it's been intended to do," Ford
added. "The degree of control over
the CIA improved very significant-
Jy in the years I was on the sub-
committee. The degree of control
by Congress improved starting
about 1960 and it's my impression
today, that regarding the proce-
dures and people involved, the CIA
is adequately monitored both pol-
icy-wise and by Congress."
Civil Rights
Asked about the Administra-
tion's proposed new civil rights
bill -- whose controversial fair
housing section narrowly squeaked
through the House and died in a
Senate filibuster last fall - Ford
said that "the attitude (of House
Republicans) will probably be rea-
sonably similar" to what it was in
1966.
At that time the House Republi-

can conference opposed adoption
of the housing section (Title IV).
Comparing the old section with
the one recently proposed, Ford
declared, "There isn't too much
difference except in the way the
Title IV provisions are implement-
ed."
(The Administration's new bill
provides for a year of voluntary
compliance before legal sanctions
directed against realtors would
take effect. As in the old bill,
private housing is largely exempt.)
The bill also provides for jury
reform and other measures, and,
said Ford, these new provisions
"will get strong support. If the
President wants action on the rest
of the bill, inclusion of the Hous-
ing section could dim the chances
of the rest.
. "Title IV is in no better position
now than a year ago. It might be
less well off," Ford continued. "I
dont see where the Presidents new
bill meets the constitutional ob-
jections Senator (Everett) Dirksen
(R-Ill.) has proposed."
Ford added that he has not dis-
cussed the bill yet with Dirksen,
who, as .Senate minority leader,
led the successful fight against last
year's housing section in the Sen-
ate.

Asked about the race for the
1968 Republican Presidential no-
mination, Ford said that the two
front-runners are "obviously" Gov.
George W. Romney and former
Vice-President Richard M. Nixon.
After them, Ford continued,
comes "a whole field of potential
Presidential darkhorses" who "run
the gamut" from Ohio Gov. John
W. Rhodes, New York Mayor John
V. Lindsay, New York Gov. Nelson
A. Rockefeller, former Pennsyl-
vania Gov. William Scranton, Cal-
ifornia Gov. Ronald Reagan, and
Sen. Charles Percy (R-Ill.).
"I would automatically exclude
myself" from the list of potential
darkhorses; Ford added. "I feel
strongly my position should be to
continue as Republican leader and
member of the House.
Ford added, "I thoroughly enjoy
the responsibilities of the legisla-
tive branch. People ought to do
what they're best at."
Should the Republicans capture
both the White House and the
House of Representatives in 1968-
Ford said, "I just couldn't ask for
any higher honor than to be con-
sidered as a candidate for Speaker
of the House." The minority leader
is traditionally elected House
Speaker when his party assumes
control of the House.

By R. A. PERRY
One goes to a concert by Artur
Rubenstein expecting to hear
nineteenth-century romantic piano
music played as beautifully as it
is possible to witness today.
The audience that gathered at
Hill Auditorium this past Sunday
thus received a predictable pro-
gram rendered in a predictably
sumptuous style by a man whose
many years seemed not to have
affected his hands and heart.
Aldous Huxley w r o t e that
"beauty is imprisoned . . between
the notes of the music . . . The
artist throws a net and catches
something, though the net is
trivial"
Unlike m a n y pianists, say
Glenn Gould, who gives us the
most meticulous and fascinating
picture of that net, Artur Ruben-
stein attempts to capture and pre-
sent the beauty and meaning held
within the framework of nota-
tion. He does not focus upon, but
subsumes, structure and technique
in order to reach and release the
emotion and thought that lives
within the work.

Rubenstein is like Schnabel in
this respect, except that he has
a greater manual facility than
Schnabel had, even at this late
age. Rubenstein produced the most
cleanly articulated and evenly
flowing runs and arpeggios that
this writer has ever heard.
Progressions from pianissimo to
forte were held within a control-
led, subtle range so that even a
triple forte did not receive the
vehement pounding that many
pianists are apt to express.
Not a servant of strict tempo,
Rubenstein molded Chopin's two
Etudes, the Grande Polonaise, and
the encore Nocturne to fit his con-
ception of the shape of each, and
only in the latter was this free-
dom too personalized. His ap-
proach to Chopin was sophis-
ticated, flowing, and perhaps just
a bit too facile.
In the 1920's Rubenstein was
one of the first to introduce Span-
ish piano music in the concert
hall. His playing Sunday of two
pieces by Chabrier and Granados,
although again warm and tech-
nically perfect, did not convey the

wit, bite, and idiom that Alicia
de Larrocha infuses into this
music.
It is a shame that for the major
work on the program, the pianist
chose not a work by Beethoven or
Schubert (he does not play mod-
ern music), but the Sonata No. 3
by Brahms.
In many ways the most trans-
portive moments came in the
Bach-Busoni Chaconne, in which
Rubenstein truly gave the audi-
ence gift of that ineffable beauty,
that exists between the notes, and
which even the greatest perform-
ers can only occasionally reveal.

It's Unequaled on the Screen
FOR FOUR
PERFORMANCES ONLY
March 8 and 9
THE
TONIGHT &r THURSDAY ONLY

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Admission $2.00

Phone 761-9700

EMU THEATRE
March 15-19

ANTON CHEKHOV '
ffreS 7r

I

I

Court Challenges Senate's
Order To Oust Wis. SDS

(Continued from Page 1)
Chief Justice Alvin Krueger said
that the court "has the authority
and jurisdiction over these inci-
dents."
SDS members went to the nine-
member court Monday with their
appeal. After the initial hearing
the nine judges went into a cau-
cus which lasted five hours. Their
decision, according to Krueger, was
unanimous that SDS may legally
appeal.
SDS members left all comment-
ing last night up to their counsel,
Cambell. Cambell told The Daily
that if Henry Haslach, president
of SDS on the Madison campus,
was contacted that "He won't talk
with you."
Hashlach was in a closed meet-I

ing scheduled to end at 12:30 a.m.
Treasurer of the chapter, Bob
Stanton told The Daily "I can't
make any statement."
If SDS is formally ousted from
the Madison campus it will not
be allowed to meet in any of the
campus buildings, hold any dem-
onstrations or take part in any
campus political activities except
the upcoming Vietnam war refer-
endum, according to the resolu-
tion.
But they will be able to re-
petition for registration in the
fall. Student leaders, however,
feel that due to the "activist" na-
ture of SDS the organization could
jeopardize its chances of accep-
tance for registration if it con-
tinues or plans any activities for
the present semester.

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Palmer
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it wouldn't
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