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March 01, 1967 - Image 6

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The Michigan Daily, 1967-03-01

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PAGE SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 1, 1967

PAGE SIX THE MICHIGAN DAILY WEDNESDAY, MAI~CH 1,1967

I

I

Friends of SNCC
Presents

NOTHING BUT A MAN
Sunday, March 5
Room 3K, Michigan Union

The CIA!
By LEWIS GULICK
WASHINGTON (P)-In the fur-
or over Central Intelligence Agen-
cy handouts to students, no one]
is questioning the CIA's legal au-
thority to spend large amounts of
the taxpayers' money in secret.
The 1949 Central Intelligence
Agency Act says the CIA director
may spend money without regard
to the provisions of the law and
regulations relating to the expen-
diture of government funds." He
can do this on a voucher certified
by him alone.
Currently presiding over the
far-flung intelligence operation is
a 53 year old former newspaper-
man, Richard Helms, a Navy lieu-
tenant in World War II who rose
through the ranks in agencies
which developed into the CIA.
Nor does CIA have to report to
Congress or to any federal de-
partment. It is an independent
agency responsible to the Presi-
dent. It does give some informa-
tion about its activities to a des-

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Shows at 7 and 9

I

ignated group of Congress' mem- The National Student Associa-
bers. tion and some other groups get-
The secrecy laid down by law ting CIA aid have, in fact, taken
and practiced by the CIA is in the some positions critical of U.S. pol-
tradition of the spy business: for icy. Defenders of the subsidies
espionage to succeed, it must be say, however, that the students did
kept quiet. a highly effective job overseas
Thus the spreading disclosures when they found the anti-Yankee
about CIA payments are not to drive led not by "liberals" but by
CIA's liking. And the publicity in hard-core communists.
each case means that even with- A variety of undercover meth-
out the presidentially ordered in- ods of payments have been devel-
vestigation, CIA would probably oped by the CIA. Foundations,
want to end that operation. trusts and special funds have been
Subsidiesto the National Stu- pipelines for CIA payments to
dent Association began at a time non-government organizations.
when government officials and One version works this way:
some internationally minded stu- Foundation X is set up under con-
dents were concerned about the trol of a person working for or
global Communist campaign to trusted by CIA. The CIA becomes
take over non-government inter- an anonymous donor to Founda-
national groups and use them for tion X, which in turn gives direct-
the Kremlin's ends. ly to private organization Y or
Some American students willing gives indirectly through some oth-
to travel to international meetings er group which makes donations.
to contest the well-financed Red This way the sources of the
delegations lacked funds. Govern- funds are concealed and the num-
ment officials decided the money ber of persons knowing about it
for the overseas U.S. student act,- can be kept to a minimum. In
vities should be paid secretly, so as some cases even the officers of the
to avoid opening the Americans to private organizations were un-
propaganda charges of being gov- aware, they said, that money their
ernment agents. Hence the job organizations received really came
went to CIA. from the CIA. Rank-and-file
This is the official version. members of the organizations
Another reason for CIA involve- generally knew nothing about it.
ment, according to some who re- In historical perspective, CIA is
call the circumstances 15 years the postwar embodiment of gov-
ago, was the uproar over the com- ernment intelligence activities
munism in government charges by that date back to the earliest days
Sen. Joseph R. McCarthy, R- Wis. of the Republic.
American collegians then as The main U.S. intelligence work
now tended to criticize U.S. for- was, until World War II, carried
eign policy, and some were far left on by the armed ,services and by
by McCarthy's standards. Open the State Department. The first
government subsidies of students four CIA directors after the war
who strayed from official policy were admirals or generals.
could have come under McCarthy's But during the war, intelligence
attack. CIA's secret payments mushroomed into a huge and com-
were hidden. plicated business. New cloak and

s Privileged Secrecy: A Historic Controversy

RICHARD HELMS

sidies for overseas student activi-
ties are only a fi action of the,
tI tai.
By general acknowleigment,t
CIA's annual budget runs into<
hundreds of millions of Dollars,<
nst of it hidden in the multi-
W."ion-dollar approapriations Con-
gres: votes for defense.
It probably employs severall
thoi sand persons, though heie'
again the numbers are seret The
CIA law provides for secrecy on
"titles, salaries, or numbers ofI
personnel employed by the agen-
cy." i
Proportionately, only a small!
percentage of CIA men are over-
seas in spy roles-although there
is probably hardly a country1
Lrcund the world without some
sort of CIA presence.
Many personnel are at work on
such projects as researcl on for-,
eign economic and scientific de-;
velopments, monitoring and ana-
lyzing foreign propaganda broad- a
sasts, compiling data on foreign
political personalities and organi-
zations.
For instance, CIA runs what it
believed to be the world's single
most comprehensive system of in-
formation storage and retrieval. It
has translation computers that can
convert Russian texts into English
at 30,000 words an hour. Its global
radio listening service relays im-
poratnt foreign broadcasts to1

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dagger outfits sprang up, most no-
tably the Office of Strategic Ser-
vices.
With the end of the hot war and
the beginning of the cold, the in-
telligence functions o'itside of
those that were strictly military
were lumped in 1947 into a new
agency, the CIA.
Today CIA is one of the federal
government's biggest operations.
Because of the secrecy, few people'
know just how large it is. Its sub-

Washington almost instantane-
ously.
Against this broad range of in-
telligence gathering, the recently
disclosed CIA subsidies to student
and other private groups have
been a relatively small operation
undertaken in the first instance at
White House orders-not on CIA
initiative.
There is some indication that
former President Harry S. Tru-
man opposed CIA getting into ac-
tions to achieve political goals, as
distinguished from merely collect-
ing intelligence.
Writing in 1963, the year after
the CIA-linked Bay of Pigs fiasco,
Truman, who was president when
the CIA was created, said:
"I never had any thought that
when I set up the CIA that it
would be injected into peacetime
cloak and dagger operations. Some
of the complications and embarr-
r",sment that I think we have ex-
perienced are in part attributable
to the fact that this quiet intelli-
gence arm of the President has
been so removed from its intended
role that it is being interpreted as
a symbol of sinister and mysteri-
ous foreign intrigue-and a sub-
ject for cold war enemy propa-
ganda.
"I, therefore, would like to see
the CIA be restored to its original
assignment as the intelligence arm
of the President, and whatever
else it can properly perform in
that special field-and that its op-
erational duties be terminated or
properly used elsewhere."
The White House now says,
however, that CIA support of Am-
erican private organizations was
started by the Truman admini-
stration under policies set by the
National Security Council in 1952
and continued thereafter.
Calls for closer supervision of
the CIA have erupted again in the
wake of the latest disclosures, but
it remains to be seen whether they
will have much effect.
Last July the Senate-after a
rare secret debate-voted 61 to 28
against a move to widen the select
panel of seven Armed Services and
Appropriations Committee mem-
members which had been privy to
CIA matters.
However, the chairman of the
group, Sen. Richard B. ,Russell, D-
Ga., broadened the membership
last month to include three For-
eign Relations Committee mem-
bers.
Within the executive branch,
the CIA is supposed to be supervis-
ed by the National Security Coun-
cil and by the P'esident's Foreign
Intelligence Advisory Board. Its
budget comes in for a Budget Bu-
reau review as do those of other
agencies.

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TURMOIL ON THE CHINESE MAINLAND!
...CHOW SHU-KAI
Ambassador of the Republic
China to the
United States of America
An examination and analysis of the
atpresent internal conflicts of Mao Tse-
tung's Communist rule and its interna-
tional repercussions.
MONDAY, March 6 8 P.M.
LOCATION TO BE ANNOUNCED
Rackham Auditorium

A

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