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February 28, 1967 - Image 7

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-02-28

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TUESDAY 'FEBRUARY 28, 1967

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

~ ~ . - -www~

TUESDKY, FEBRUARY 28, 1967 ut a e W n.a.

PAGE SEVEI1

N

Hoosiers

Win

29 for Dill
But Last
Bid Fails
By CLARK NORTON
Acting Sports Editor
Sometimes cliches would be wel-
come.
Like the oldest of them all, "In
this league, any team can beat
any other on a given night."
But just when it might seem
appropriate, a pass goes awry and
another loss has to be chalked
up for Michigan's error-prone bas-
ketball team.
This defeat-the fifth in a row
-was to conference front-runner
Indiana last night in Yost Field
House, 98-96. The Hoosiers are
now 8-3, while the Wolverines
are 2-9.
Ironies abounded.
The two teams have done a
complete about-face from last year,
wheni Michigan won its third
straight Big Ten title and Indiana
languished in the cellar.
Cazzie Returns 'Incognito'
But one of the major reasons
for Wolverine pre-eminence in
past - seasons stepped onto the
court only in street clothes, to ac-
cept the Chicago Tribune's silver
basketball trophy for being voted
Most Valuable Player in the Big
Ten last year.
Cazzie Lee Russell was the cen-
ter of attention. But he was near-
ly upstaged by a late surge led by
Craig Dill and Jim Pitts which
almost brought the Wolverines
back from a 13-point deficit with
seven minutes to go to an upset
victory.
With a minute and a half left
and the Hoosiers clinging to a
five-point edge, Dill sank both
ends of a one-and-one opportuni-
ty at the charity stripe, and Pitts
followed seconds later with one
out of two.
Jumper for Joyner
The Hoosiers managed to break
high scorer Butch Joyner open
under the basket for two of his
game-high 33 points, but Pitts
countered with a tip-in of a miss-
ed Dill jumper, and moved Mich-
igan within two points, 96-94, with
less than a minute to play.
Joyner, finding himself alone
in the corner soon after, faked a
jumper, hesitated, then nonchal-
antly shrugged his shoulders and
popped in a 15-footer, as if he
had nothing better to do. "That
shot took a lot of guts, or some-
thing," Michigan Coach Dave
Strack shook his head after the
game. "But it sure hurt."
Dill tipped in a missed Ken
Maxey layup with 24 seconds left,
however, and Maxey managed to
set himself in the path of an
oncoming Joyner, eliciting an of-
fensive foul on the Hoosier for-
ward and presenting the Wolver-
ines with the ball with nine sec-

-Daily-Tho
CRAIG DILL KNEELS IN FRUSTRATION after droppi
with seconds left in yesterday's tragic 98-96 loss to Indi
Wolverines, with Dill scoring 29 points, chopped a
Hoosier lead down to two in the last six minutes of t
but were unable to send it into overtime.

98-96
Purdue
Stops Iowa-;
MSU Win
wins
By The Associated Press
IOWA CITY - Purdue rallied
from behind in the last half for a
78-75 victory last night that sniff-
ed out Iowa's flickering Big Ten
basketball hopes.
The setback put. the Hawkeyes
in a two-way tie with Purdue for
fifth place with a 6-6 record. Iowa
had been tied for second.
Down 34-31 shortly after the
start of the second half, the Boil-
ermakers' Roger Blalock came up
with a three-point play to tie it,
and a minute later Purdue moved
ahead 38-36, never to trail after
that.
T h e Boilermakers expanded
masR.Copi their lead to 70-59 with 3:53 to
ng a pass go. Iowa cut it to 72-67 and a pair
iana. The of free throws by Gerry Jones
14-point chopped the deficit to 76-73 with
the game, 30 seconds left.
.However, Blalock's basket with
nine seconds remaining put it
red a start- away for Purdue.
Strack, led Jones and Williams shared scor-
ounds with ing honors with 24, while Herman
Gilliam topped Purdue with 18
y hard to- and Blalock had 17. d
d. "But we
t shot the 19th at Home
(almost 52 EAST LANSING - Michigan
e) and just State defeated Ohio State 74-63
aybe every- last night for its 19th straight Big
.or me,. al- Ten basketball victory at home.
fair to the T h e Spartans outrebounded
r the breaks OSU 30-13 in the first half and
way again." 58-32 for the game.
main three MSU held a 30-28 halftime lead
t this year. after leading most of the first
r, the 1966- half. Ohio State led just once on
.e to take a a driving layup by Bill Hosket to
make it 14-13.
5m :.:::::t: Lee Lafayette and John Bailey
paced the Spartans with 17 points'
each. Matt Aitch added 10.
ird * *
Dawson-Lifts Illini
....... CHAMPAIGN - Jim Dawson's
and fra- four baskets in the opening 4 /2
champion- minutes of the second half broke
t 7:30 to- a 32-32 intermission tie and sent
Pool. Also, Illinois to an 84-71 Big Ten bas-
rnity, res- ketball victory over Minnesota last
ndependent night.
ships will Dawson's splurge put the Illini
orts Build- ahead 57-47, and the Gophers
never came within seven points
of closing the gap. Dawson totalled
31 points for the game, 22 in the
EDITOR last half, as the Illini boosted
K their Big Ten record to 5-6 and
Minnesota slipped to 4-8.

is Cagers' Surge

Toledo Dumps Freshmen, 79-70

By JOEL BLOCK
Freshman forward Rudy Tom-
janovich scored 22 points and pull-
ed down 20 rebounds before foul-
ing out but it was not enough as
the Toledo frosh swept to a 79-70
victory last, night.
The contest, a preliminary to
last night's varsity game with In-
diana, was muddled by 41 turn-
overs, and over 100 missed shots.
The Wolverines started off the
game hot and had a 12-4 lead
early in the first half. But as a
result of several misplays, the
Rockets came back to lead by a
point with less than a minute left
in the half, It took a long pass
from Bill Fraumann to Steve
Fishman and the ensuing layup to

give Michigan a 32-31 halftime fifth foul and the Wolverines never
lead, got any closer than five points.

No Mean Task
A loose Wolverine defense per-
mitted Toledo to gain a quick
40-34 margin and Michigan found
it hard to score, missing two
breakaway layups within a minute
of each other early in the period.
The Rocket lead wavered from
three to seven points throughout'
the second stanza but the fresh-
man Wolverines seemed always a
step or a jump behind their Toledo
counterparts.
With 4:20 left on the Yost Field
House clock, Tomjanovich was
whistled for a charging foul as he
reached over a Toledo defender
to flip in a field goal. It was his

MICHIGAN FROSH

Tomjanovich
Fraunmann
Lawson
Henry
Bloodworth
Fishman
Dobson
Totals
Mu men
Geistler
Hess
Miller
Smith
Sonseri
Jaros
Totals
MICHIGANI
TOLEDO

hL

G F R
10-20 2-4 20
3-13 5-7 14
2-6 1-1 3
2-13 3-4 7
5-9 2-2 3
4-11 0-0 1
1-3 3-5 4
27-7516-23 52

P T
5 22
2 11
2 5
3 7
2 12
28
425
20 70

TOLEDO
G F R P T
6-18 4-6 8 1 16
5-il 3-6 6 2 13.
4-14 0-0 17 2 S
9-14 5-7 8. 4 21
5-14 4-6 7 3 14
3-7 1-2 1 3 7
0-0 0-0 1 1 0
31-7817-2748 16 79
FROSH 32 38-70
31 48-7f

CAZZIE RUSSELL

onds to play and a two-point gap
to overcome.
For Want of a Pass ...
Strack called for a time out,
instructing the players to "feed
Dill and go from there." But after
Bankey had taken the in-bounds
pass from Maxey, he shot an er-
rant pass into the Michigan cen-
ter, who let it slip over his shoul-
ders to an awaiting Vernon Payne.
The slick-shooting Hoosier guard
bounced about the court to mon-
opolize the remaining time.
"Any one of those guys should
have shot for the basket when
Dill was boxed up at the end,"
an autograph-hounded Russell
grimaced. "And some of them
could have done without those long
shots the whole game. But if Dill
had played last year like he did
tonight, we would have ripped ev-
erybody."
Dill poured in 29 points, on a
variety of hooks, jumpers, and tip-
ins, although forward Dave Mc-
MICHIGAN

Clellan, who "has secu
ing job," according to
the team again in reb
14.
"We played awfully
night," Strack groane
ran into a team tha
eyes out of the basket
per cent for the gam
couldn't pull it off. Me
thing's evening up fc
though it doesn't seem
team. Maybe next year
will start coming our v
But first there re
games to be played ou
And to escape the cella
67 Wolverines may hav
few old cliches to heart
BilIboa
The residence hall
ternity swimmingc
ships will be held a
night in Matt Mannl
the professional frate
idence hall, and in
basketball champions
take place in the Sp
ing at the same time.
SPORTS NIGHT E
. JOEL BLOC]

Fails

Who's the Man Behind
the4c Canadian Nickel ?
Announces a Real Live
CONTEST{
For the best cartoon of Ann Arbor's
Grafter Supreme
FIELDING F. RAALF
Just look at these neat prizes
YOU can win:
1st PRIZE: $20 worth of groceries
2nd PRIZE: $10 worth of groceries
3rd PRIZE: $5 worth of groceries
BOOBY PRIZE: One free popsicle each
day of the semester
All entries must be submitted to the Garg office on
or before Feb. 28th.
Winners will be announced by carrier pigeon.

1E --1

THE MEN OF
SIGMA NU
ANNOUNCE THAT
THEY HAVE SUCCESSFULLY
DEFENDED THEIR
HONOR WITH A
SMASHING VICTORY
OVER CHI PHI-
27-21 (per couple)

Sullivan, f
McClellan, f
Dill, e
Pitts, g
Bankey, g
Stewart, f
Maxey, g
Totals
Joyner, f
Johnson, f
DeHeer, c
Payne, g
Russell, g
Schneider, f
Pfaff, g
Schrumpe, c
Turpen, g
Totals
MICHIGAN
INDIANA

G F R
2-5 0-2 5
6-9 7-9 14
12-25 5-6 10
4-11 12-13 12
4-7 1-1 2
2-8 0-0 1
5-9 1-1 0
35-74 26-32 47

P T
2 4
3 19
3 29
2 20
4 9
1 4
4 11
19 96

I LIE'w i
I I!

INDIANA
G F R.P
12-18 9-9 11 2
5-9 0-0 6 5
6-15 3-5 14 4
8-16 2-5 1 2
7-14 2-3 4 2
1-4 2-2 2 4
1-3 _0-0 1 0
0-0 0-0 0 0
0-0 0-0 0 3
40-79 18-24 43 22

T
33
10
15
18
16
4
2
0
0
98

46 50-96
49 49-98

where
yoube
In as good a spot 4I an original contribu.
as you are today? tion to your area of
Well-informed? JI JIinterest. In an
Up on things? environment like
Intimately this, there's no
acquainted with the O telling how far

state of the art in your field
of study?
Or will you (through no fault
of your own) be dangerously
close to the brink of
obsolescence ?
Could happen. Often does.
Which is one good reason to
consider a career at MITRE.
MITRE is pioneering in the
design and engineering of
complex informati8n, sensor,
command, control and com-
munications systems for the
United States Government.
Our assignments include such
prominent electronic systems
as the NORAD Combat
Operations Center, the Back.
up Interceptor Command
System for SAGE, and the
National Military Command
System (NMCS).
These projects represent the
most important systems
challenges of our time, and
require the most advanced
thinking on a broad range of
scientific problems and the
technologies needed to
solve them.
As a member of the MITRE
team, you'll be working in an
atmosphere of scientific
inquiry, alongside colleagues
of outstanding reputation,
with the opportunity to make

you can go. But this much is
certain. You'll not be over-
looked, and you can't be
overtaken.
Salary? Benefits? They're
competitive, of course. More-
over, we have an excellent
Educational Assistance and
Staff Scholar Program.
(Many MITRE employees
presently attend nearby
educational institutions includ-
ing Harvard, Boston University,
Boston College, Brandeis,
Northeastern, MIT, and Tufts.)
Depending on your interests,
qualifications and current
openings, you may start in one
of the following, or other,
departments:
System Planning and
Engineering
Air and Missile
Defense Systems
System Design
Systems Analysis
Air Traffic Systems
Tactical Systems
Strategic Systems
Range Instrumentation
Information Sciences
Computer & Display
Technology
Communications
Electronic Warfare
Radar Design
and Technology
Information Processing
Surveillance and
Warning Systems
Applied Mathematics

--
U y 'Sis ┬░ot",ARE CC
o I
WED., MARCH 1
6:00 P.M.-Opening Reception and Banquet:
Speaker: Jack H. Vaughn, Director,
The Peace Corps
(Michigan Union Ballroom)
THURS., MARCH 2
10:00 a.m.-TOPIC SESSION:
The Right of Free Expression
Arthur Miller, playwright
Mike Wallace, TV commentator
Arnold Gingrich, Publisher, Esquire
(Rackham Lecture Hall)
2:00 P.M.-TOPIC SESSION:
The Political Picture Today
Senator Philip A. Hart
Congressman Gerald R. Ford
6:00 P.M.-All Sports Banquet
Honoring Michigan Athletic Greats

STUDENTS, FACULTY AND STAFF
DRDIALLY INVITED TO ATTEND THE EVENTS OF
THE UNIVERSITY SESQUICENTENNIAL
ALUMNI CELEBRATION
FRI., MARCH 3
10:00 A.M.-TOPIC SESSION:
American Enterprise-What Lies Ahead
Lynn Townsend, Chairman, Chrysler Corp.
Donald C. Cook, President, American
Electric Co.
H. Bruce Palmer, President,
National Industrial Conf. Board
(Rackham Lecture Hall)
10:00 A.M.-TOPIC SESSION:
The Law and Public Order
Richard A. Wasserstrom,
Dean, Tuskegee Institute
Judge John R. Brown, U.S. Court
of Appeals, Fifth Circuit
Hobart Taylor, Director, Export-Import
Bank of Washington
(Rackham Ampitheatre)
2:30 P.M.-TOPIC DISCUSSION
Michigan in Orbit-A Discussion of the
Future of the Apollo Space Program
Joseph F. Shea, Manager Apollo
Space Program
General Edward H. White, Sr.,
father of late Astronaut White
6:00 P.M.-Awards Banquet
Honoring recipients of the
Sesquicentennial Award

It'almost seems a shame to
put a Volkswagen engine in it.
The Karmann Ghia isn't designed for the masses.
Nor is it built like a mass-production car.
Fenders, hoods and door frames still get hand-
welded, hand-shaped and hand-smoothed..
Convertible tops are still padded by hand.
The Ghia's paint job is even four coats deep in
hand work.
So here you've got this' gorgeous hunk of car,
but when you get right down to basics, it's still a
Volkswagen.
Chassis, transmission and suspension are all
Volkswagen.
And so is the engine.
In fact, the Ghia's power comes from the very
same air-cooled motor that pushed our regular

ALL TOPIC SESSIONS ARE OPEN TO THE PUBLIC FREE OF CHARGE

I

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