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February 28, 1967 - Image 6

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The Michigan Daily, 1967-02-28

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PAGE ' Srx

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 1967

PAGE SIX THE MICHIGAN DAILY TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 1967

Gin dermen

By BOB McFARLAND
Acting Executive Sports Editor
Wolverine head track coach Don
Canham loves surprises, especially'
in the Big Ten Championship
meets.
Take the case of one of his
former cindermen, John Love, who
is now track mentor at Ann Arbor
High. "He was ranked fourteenth
in the conference when they put
the hurdle times on the board be-
fpre the Big Ten meet," Canham
recalls. "Then, he went out there
and won the race," he smiled.
This is the kind of surprise
which Canham has specialized in
during his 18 years as head coach
of the Michigan thinclads, a span
in which his charges have garn-
ered 11 Big Ten crowns.
Analyzing the conference yester-

day, Canham stated, "Wisconsin
and Michigan State have to be
rated as co-favorites. Iowa's in the
same shape we are. They get a
few breaks and they can sneak
in there."
Dulled Edge
But how well the two leaders do
on Friday and Saturday may have
been partially determined by their
head-to-head confrontation in a
dual meet last Saturday. Stiff
competition of this sort can take
the edge of an athlete's perform-
ance.
"What we're hoping now is that
Michigan State and Wisconsin
played themselves out against each
other on Saturday. Going all out
can have a definite effect. Ron
Kutschinski ran a hell of a race
in Madison Square Garden with

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Stalk
the two-mile relay team, and it
took him two weeks to round back
into top form again," Canham
continued.
A Lot Worse
Assistant coach Dave Martin
agreed about the effects of the
meet, won by Michigan State 76-
64. "I know one thing," he com-
mented. "Michigan State and Wis-
consin are feeling a lot worse than
we are today."
In a compilation of the best
times through the week of Febru-
ary 18, the Badgers led with six
first places, followed by the Wol-
verines and Spartans with four
each, and Iowa with three. The
Michigan and MSU totals included
two relay clockings apiece, which
will not be among the events
scheduled in Madison.
The only individual Wolverine
leaders were captain Jack Harvey,
defending champion in the shot
put, and sophomore Gary Knicker-
bocker, who sports a 6'9%" leap in
the high jump.
Throw Times Away
Quick to de-emphasize these
statistics so often cited by scribes,
Canham noted, "For these meets,
you can throw the times away.
They don't mean a thing. Ability
is what counts, and we know we
have it in several places. It's just
a matter of putting 'together all
the pieces of a puzzle on the same
day. We've won other titles like
this," he added.
The top battle of the weekend
may develop in the 880-yard run,
where three excellent half milers,
led by Wolverine Kutschinski are
be two other sophomores, Ray
entered in the field. His foes will
Arrington of Wisconsin, and the
Spartans' John Spain.
Kutchinski vs. Spain
Kutschinski, who snapped the
varsity and Yost Field House stan-
dards with a 1:51.5 performance
Saturday, will meet Spain for the
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first time since the 1965 Michigan
High School Track Champion-
ships. Although the Michigan run-
ner came out on top in that en-
counter, he offered nothing but
praise for his Spartan nemesis af-
ter the performance Saturday.
"The only reason I beat him
then was because he ran a poor
race, and he's bigger and stronger
now," Kutschinski pointed out.
The Wolverines will enter an-
other strong contender in the 660-
yard run. With a 1:11.5 time to his
credit this season, he will have to
deal with Mike Mondane, defend-
ing conference title holder, who
has been clocked in 1:11.0 for the
distance.
Kearney in Mile

the ability to win the mile, if he's!
in perfect health," which intro-
duces another factor which may
affect the meet.
Influenza
Kearney, half-miler John Reyn-
olds, and other Wolverine cinder-
men have been bothered by the!
flu and bronchitis lately. "Influ-
enza is certainly another factor,"
Canham notes, "but it's sweeping
the entire Midwest right now, and
everyone will feel it."
Another middle-distance event,
the 1000-yard run, will feature
Ken Coffin, a Wolverine junior,
who placed second in the confer-
ence meet last season. Arrington,
also rates high in this category.
George Hoey and Carl Ward will

manned by Bill Colton,

en

Crown

Kuts-

The mile run holds another pos- provide the Michigan threat in the
sibility of victory for the Mich 60-yard dash. Another Badger,
igan thinclads. Representing the Aquine Jackson, boasts the best
Maize and Blue will be Tom Kear- time for the sprint. Minnesota's

ney, who holds the second best.
time through Feb. 18, a 4:11.8 ef-
fort. Pacing the field will be Larry
Wieczorek, who zipped through the
fastest 1760-yards in Big Ten his-
tory, a 4:05.6 performance.
According to Canham, "There's
not any question that Kearney has

top speedster Hubie Bryant, suf-
fered a pulled hamstring last week
and sat out of the Gopher's dual
meet with Iowa Saturday. His
status is doubtful for the Indoors.
Rick Hunt, who copped the Big
Ten high jump championship out-
doors, and the mile relay team,

chinski, McDonald, and Bob Gero-
metta, also rate as important keys
to the Wolverine championship
drive.
Michigan State's powerful hurdle
contingent will attempt the iden-
tical one-two-three sweep that
they accomplished last year, but
with slightly different personnel.
Gene Washington, who grabbed
both the 70-yard lows and highs
will return to defend both crowns.
He will be joined by teammate
Charles Pollard, owner of an :08.2
clocking for the highs which is the
best ever in the Big Ten, and an-
other Spartan, Bob Steele.
Dick Sharkey, another MSU cin-
derman, is expected to run away
with the two-mile run. His 8:51.2
time is 15 seconds better than that
of the runner-up, Iowa's Wieczo-
rek.
Who will be in the Wolverine
surprise package? Hurdlers Larry
Midlam and Nelson Graham, Col-
ton in the 300-yard dash and
Gerometta in the 440, Elmo Mo-
rales and Reynolds in the 880-yard
run, Steve Leuchtman and Bob
Thomas in the shot put, Carl
Flowers in the long jump, Clarence
Martin in the higlh jump, and Carl
Watkins and Matti'Kipelainen in
the pole vault, could provide the
needed push.
As Canham remarked, "If we
can only pump enough guys in
there, then ....
Scores
COLLEGE BASKETBALL
Georgia Tech 90, Miami (Fla) 84
Chicago Loyola 110, Bowling Green 93
Tennessee Tech 111, E. Kentucky 91
Mississippi State 74, Vanderbilt 71
Western Kentucky 116, Austin Peay 76
Kansas State 84, Oklahoma 71
Auburn 60, Kentucky 49
Alabama 53, Tennessee 52
NBA
St. Louis 105, Detroit 94

Behind Closed Doors

BOB McFARLAND

Ai

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This Week in Sports,
THURSDAY
Gymnastics-Western Conference Meet at Iowa City
Swimming-Western Conference Meet at East Lansing
FRIDAY
Hockey-Michigan at Minnesota
Wrestling-Western Conference Meet at Columbus
Track-Western Conference Meet at Madison'
Gymnastics-Western Conference Meet at Iowa City
Swimming-Western Conference Meet at East Lansing
SATURDAY
Basketball-Michigan vs. Wisconsin at Cobo Hall, Detroit
Hockey-Michigan at Minnesota
Wrestling-Western Conference Meet at Columbus
Track-Western Conference Meet at Madison
Gymnastics-Western Conference Meet at Iowa City
Swimming-Western Conference Meet at East Lansing
MONDAY
Basketball-Michigan at Indiana
A representative from the
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March 13, 1967
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Big Ten Standings

11

Indiana
Michigan State
Northwestern
Wisconsin
Iowa
Purdue
Illinois
OSU
Minnesota
MICHIGAN

W
8
7
6
6
6
6
5
5
4
2

L
3
4
4
4
5
5
6
7
8
9

Pet
.727
.600
.600
.600
.545.
.545
.417
.454
.333
.192

"Everybody else is doing it. Illinois just got caught."
"If you don't slip them money under the table, you're not
going to come up with winning teams."
"Let's be practical about this. College athletes are no longer
amateur. It's big business in the truest sense of the term. The
only reason intercollegiate sports exist is to make money."
"There are no finer men around than those Illinois coaches.
Sure, they may have broken the rules here and there, but think
about all those years of service they've given to the conference."
These are representative of the excuses being offered for the
financial aid violations committed by three Illinois coaches, Pete
Elliott, Harry Combes, and Howie Braun. Students on the Champaign-
Urbana campus, Illinois alumni, and public officials have all rallied
around the trio. Even Gov. Otto Kerner got into the act Sunday,
when he termed Big Ten punishment as "excessive."
The Big Ten faculty representatives, who are scheduled to act
tomorrow on the Illini appeal of last week's decision, are caught in a
hotbox, and it appears that no matter which way they decide to run,
the Big Ten will be tagged out.
One course of action open to them, of course, would be to reverse
the Big Ten athletic directors' choice to enforce the letter of the
laws when they demanded that Illinois fire the three coaches for
handing out monies from the $21,000 slush fund established by for-
mer athletic director Doug Mills, and his assistant-turned-informant,
Mel Brewer. They could accept the penalties which Illinois imposed
on the men as just; namely, suspending the coaches from recruiting
activities for one year.
This would satisfy public opinion, certainly, and allow Elliott,
a well-respected and popular mentor, to remain at the helm of the
Fighting Illini.
But how would it satisfy Section 11 (a) of the Big Ten Regula-
tions which states:
"Any conference university which employs or retains on its
athletic staff anyone who has violated or has been a party to a
violation of the provisions of this regulation, or who encourages
others to violate this regulation, or who, upon inquiry by the
commissioner, withholds knowledge of the violation of this regu-
lation by others, shall be required to show cause why its mem-
bership in the conference should not be suspended or terminated."
The language is straightforward. Illinois has admitted the viola-
tions. The penalty has been set down. Now, Illinois President David
D. Henry will attempt'to "show cause why its membership in the
conference should not be suspended or terminated.
Henry claims that Illinois will withdraw from the conference
rather than accept the judgment, if his appeal is not successful. Tle
end of the Big Ten; back to the Big Nine.
But that may not be the end of things. Elliott is reported now
to have threatened the disclosure of other recruiting violations by
Western Conference membels . . . if the nuling is not reversed. So
it's no holds barred, and once the name calling begins, it's going to
be difficult to stop. First, the escalation. Then, the fragmentation.
A similar development led to the break-up of the Pacific Coast Con-
ference in the fifties.
A difficult predicament faces the faculty representatives. Do you
sacrifice principle for practicality or vice versa?
From this writer's viewpoint, there is only one realistic path to
follow. The Big Ten should stick by its guns, and require Illinois to
either dismiss Elliott, Combes, and Braun, or withdraw from the
conference.
The Big ;Ten has long held itself up as a crusader for ama-
teurism in collegiate athletics. By failing to enforce this serious
infraction of its regulations, it would announce that these prin-
ciples are no longer worth more than the paper they're printed on.
The press has yelled "hypocrisy" at the Western Conference. In
other leagues where athletes are "students" in name only, univer-
sities have chuckled silently at the Big Ten's misfortunes. Until
allegations against other conference members. become fact and not
mere rumors however, these charges have the weight of arrows
against guns.
If the conference believes that other institutions are guilty, it
should undertake its own investigation, beating its critics to the
punch.
Or the Big Ten may decide that it's no longer worth the
trouble tostem' the rising tide of professionalism. But if this is to
be the Conference philosophy, it should be enacted by legislation,
not pardons.
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14

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Yesterday's Results
Indiana 98, Michigan 96
Michigan State 74, Ohio State 63
Purdue 78, Iowa 75
Illinois 84, Minnesota 81

E

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