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February 28, 1967 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-02-28

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 1967

L i

PAGE TWO TIlL MICUIGAN DAILY TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 1967

MUSIC

Black Bag's

Identity

AI

New' Minneapolis Symphony
Performs Exciting Program

Remains a Secret

By R. A. PERRY;
Under the baton of Stanislaw1
Skrowaczewski, the Minneapolis
Symphony has risen from a medi-
ocre, small-town orchestra to a'
first-class musical organization.
Sunday's concert in Hill Audi-
torium showed well the degree of
control and refinement that
Skrowaczewski has effected in
only two years of leadership. The
only orchestra that has seen a
similar rise in quality is the Cin-
cinati under Max Rudolf.
The major work in Sunday's
program was the Tenth Symphony
of Dimitri Shostakovitch, a work
containing both very stirring and
very dreary passages, the latter
stemming mostly from a Mahle-
rian redundancy of minor motives.
Shostakovitch, always in and out
of Party favor, has stated that in
this work "I wanted to portray
human emotions and passions."
From this generalization, one can
assume that the much present
woodwinds provide the personal-
ized human voices and the string
create the chorus, the social and
historical framework.
This symphony gave the or-
chestra an opportunity to high-
light its fine, first-chair woodwind
soloists who played confidently
and sensitively. The work also al-
lowed the string section to show
off its precision and shining tone
which even in the loudest pas-
sages did not spread and fray. The
plastic rendering of the first two
movements, with the inner voices
heard in the most massive pas-
sages, would have pleased Tosca-
nini, but such conceneration was
somewhat dissipated in the last
two movements.
Schubert's Symphony No. 3, dis-
playing both the master's profu-
sion of song and his occasional
perfunctory development of such
lyrics, was played in a pointed,
tight, and energetic manner that
reminds us again of Toscanini.
The younger conductors-Mehta,
Davis, Ozawa, Kertesz, Skrowac-
zewski-indeed look back to Tos-
canini and not to Furtwangler or
Walter; therefore .some of the
mellowness and easy flow of the

Schubert was not to be found in
this performance.
Also featured on this varied pro-
gram was Ross Lee Finney's "Con-
certo for Percussion and Orches-
tra." Mr. Finney, composer-in-
residence at the University, com-
posed this concerto in 1965.
The score calls- for the complete
range of percussion instruments,
from alto triangle to contrabass
tam tam, and offers an exciting
and fascinating aural experience.
Although Finney is labelled as
one of the avant garde (whatever
that means in today's mercurial
culture scene), the composition is

conservative at least in that, being
a concerto, the solo percussions
function as a voice separate from
the orchestra.
It will be some time until the
audience will hear this music as
anything but an aural thrill.
Eventually, either from acquired
knowledge or repeated exposure,
the listening audience will dis-
cover its structure and then, that
horrible word, meaning.
At present, it is fascinating to
watch the men of the orchestra
spinning out the chaotic web of
sounds in which they themselves
are entrapped.

Across Campus

CORVALLIS, Ore. (P)-A mys-
terious student has been attending'
a class at Oregon State University
for the past two months enveloped
in a big black bag. Only his bare
feet show.
Each Monday, Wednesday and
Friday at 11 A.M.; the Black Bag
sits on a small table near the back
of the classroom. The class is
Speech 113-basic persuasion.
The Black Bag seldom speaks or
moves. But a newsman who at-
tended the class says his presence
becomes overwhelming.
Charles Goetzinger, professor of
the class, knows the identity of
the person inside. None of the 20
students in the class do.
Goetzinger said the students'
attitude changed from hostility
toward the Black Bag to curiosity
and finally to friendship.
"We must find a rationale for
everything. Life is pretty well
structured from birth to death.
We always have a frame of ref-
erence for events," Goetzinger said.
"Then in walks a black bag with
a human inside it. Nowhere in our
frame of reference has there been
such a thing. So we resent it. But
we're stuck, so we find reasons
for it all. And once we find rea-
sons, then we defend our reason-
ing. So now, we defend the Black
Bag."
The term ends March 13. Will
the Black Bag disclose his iden-
tity?
He says he doesn't know.
"I might just walk out in my
black bag, go somewhere and hide
it and just be a human being
again. I don't know."

He arrives and leaves in a car
driven by a friend and apparently
lives on or near the campus. He
says there is no physical reason
for wearing the bag, and he does
not wear it to his other classes.
"No, I'm not malformed. No,
I'm not a Negro, although dis-
crimination enters into it. I am
sure the Negro must be stared at
and resented just like I am in the
bag," he says.
Goetzinger, explaining the Black
Bag's presence, says, "The student
came to me before the term start-
ed and said he wanted to come
to class in a black bag. I'm enough
of a nut to try anything once, so
I went for it."

I

TUESDAY, FEB. 28
4:10 p.m.-Playwright Arthur
Miller will speak informally in
Rackham Lecture Hall.
8:30 p.m.-The University Phil-
harmonia, with Josef Blatt and
Theo Alcantara conducting, and
Jeffrey Hollander as pianist, will
perform at Hill Aud.
8:30 p.m.-Andres Segovia, gui-
tarist, will perform in Rackham
Aud.
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 1
9:00 a.m.-Registration for the
Sesquicentennial Alumni Celebra-
tion will be held in the lobby of
the Union.
8:00 p.m.-John D. Baldesch-
wieler of Stanford University will
speak on a "Study of Ion-molecule
Reactions by Cycvotron Resonance
Spectroscopy" in Room 296 of the
Physics-Astronomy Bldg.
8:30 p.m.-Andres Segovia, gui-
tarist, will perform in Rackham.
Aud.
THURSDAY, MARCH 2
10:00 am.-The first Sesquicen-
tennial Alumni Celebration Topic
Session will present "The Right of
Free Expression" in Rackham
Lecture Hall.
2:30 p.m.-The Sesquicentennial
Alumni Celebration will discuss

"The Political Picture Today,"
Rackham Lecture Hall.
6:00 p.m. -- Sesquicentennial
Alumni Celebration Reception and
Banquet, Michigan Union Ball-
room.
FRIDAY, MARCH 3
10:00 a.m. - Sesquicentennial
Alumni Celebration Topic Session
will be "American Enterprise -
What Lies Ahead" and "The Law
and Public Order" in the Rackham
Lecture Hall.
2:30 p.m. - Sesquicentennial
Alumni Celebration will present
"Michigan in Orbit" in the Rack-
ham Lecture Hall.
6:00 p.m. - Sesquicentennial
Alumni Celebration Public Recep-
tion in the League Ballroom.

I

I

IF

THE DEPARTMENT OF SPEECH

Fri ends of SNCC

Presents

NOTHING BUT A MAN

A Oeren Production v A Universal Release
"A picture of considerable
quality. Uncommonly good per-
formances from top to bottom.
The sense of reality is main-
tained to an extent not often
found in movies of this kind
or any other. Sarafian has
worked extremely well . . . the
mark of a rare ability. This
tour-de-force overwhelms the
spectator."
-Archer Winsten, Post
Starts Weds., March 8
Showtimes: 7 & 9
A th
Ann Arbor, Michigan
210 S. Fifth Avenue
761-9700

14

THE PROFESSIONAL THEATRE PROGRAM
anTE
THE CENTRAL SESQUICENTENNIAL COMMITTEE

present

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

Sunday, March 5
Room 3K, Michigan Union

The Daily Offilcal Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editor-
ial responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3564 Administration Bldg. be-
fore 2 p.m. of the day preceding
publication and by 2 p.m. Friday
ORGAN IZATION
NOTICES
USE OF THIS COLUMN FOR AN-
NOUNCEMENTS Is available to officially
recognized and registered student orga-
nizations only. Forms are available in
Room 1011 BAB. ,
Deutscher Verein, Kaffeestunde, Wed.,
March 1, 3-5 p.m., 3050 Frieze Bldg.
College Republican Club, General
meeting with discussion on the draft
with Prof. Meyer, Feb. 28, 7:30 p.m.,
Conference Rooms 3 and 4, Michigan
League.

for Saturday and Sunday. General
Notices may be published a maxi-
mum of two times on request; Day
Calendar items appear once only.
Student organization notices are not
accepted for publication. For more
information call 764-9270.
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 28
Day Calendar
Bureau of Industrial Relations Sem-
inar-"The Management of Managers":
146 School of Business Administration,
8:15 a.m.
Bureau of Industrial Relations Sem-
inar - "Management by Orientation":
Michigan Union, 8:30 a.m.
School of Music Recital-Students of
the Wind Instrument Department: Re-
cital Hall, School of Music, 12:30 p.m.
(Continued on Page 8)
DIAL 5-6290
Ending Thursday

Admission-$1 .00

Shows at 7

and 9

ART UII MILLER
SPEAKING ON THE
CONTEMPORARY
THEATRE
RACKHAM LECTURE HALL
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 28

I

-

A9

T Y -

L

L "lIAI PRESENTS:
The Lovin' Spoonful
SATURDAY, MARCH 11
8:30 P.M.
HILL AUDITORIUM
$3.50, $3.00, $2.50

4:10 P.M.

r

4

I

Russky Kruzhok, Teaa
conversation, Tues., Feb.
3050 Frieze Bldg..

and Russian
28, 3-5 p.m.,

3

NOMINAT
FOR 4
ACADEM)
AWARDS
INCLUDINC
BEST
PICTURE

ED
X
Y)

SEATS NOW!
PTP TICKET OFFICE, MENDELSSOHN THEATRE
I " Ftl N I

A

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BLOCK DRAWING
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 1
11:00 A.M.-A.A.B.

INDIVIDUAL SALES
TUESDAY, MARCH 7
8:00 A.M.-HILL AUD.

I

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In Without A IT'S Delightful
TICKET!
* INDIVIDUAL SALES
FIRST FLOOR IT'S Delicious
MICHIGAN LEAGUE
All Seats $2.50 IT'S Delovely
PERFORMANCES:
DATE:
Wed.-Sat., March 8-11
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A PARAMUUNI PICUR lLUtIUL
-FRIDAY-
"MONKEYS GO HOME"

I

I

U

.qwwmqr.

9a

Danger fits
{ him like a tight '
,X :. .:.:black igloves A.

W, X

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