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February 22, 1967 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-02-22

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PAGE. TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 1967

PAGE TWO TIlE MIChiGAN DAILY WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 1967

CRISIS LOOMS:
Publications Board To Meet
Tomorrow, Consider Editors

Hayden Seeks Reorganization
O f Ghetto Economic Conditions

(uontinueo rrom Pag 1)

attempts to solve the probl em.

(Continued from Page 1)
or six nuclei of faculty who
would be interested in investiga-
ting ... what the board was doing
and why."
He said that "various groups in
various ways" might investigate,
the board's reaction to the senior
recommendation, but added that
yesterday was too early a date to
suggest how this might be for-
mally implemented.
Other juniors recommended for
new positions included William
Krauss, '68, as business manager.
Recommended for the senior edi-
torial staff positions were: Mere-
dith Eiker, managing editor; Mich-
ael Heffer, city editor; Robert Kli-
vans, editorial director; Neil Shis-
ter, magazine editor; Susan
Schnepp, personnel director;
Assistant managing editors, Su-
san Elan and Laurence Medow;
assistant editorial directors, Steph-

en Firshein and Ronald Klempner; Wechsler, advertising; Jean Ros-
assistant magazine editors, Carole inski, personnel; Dianne Smaller,
Kaplan and Lissa Matross. finance; Sam Offen, circulation
Recommended to the senior bus- and summer business manager, and
iness staff were: Erica Keeps, as- Phyliss Levinson, freshman supple-
sociate business manager; Steve ment.
SGC Defends Right To
Sho xeietlFilm

years, according to Hayden. Yet Commenting on civil rights proj-
the housing standard has not im- ects, he said, "Substituting Negroes
proved, employment has not in- for whites will not solve the prob-
creased and local economic ven- lem of program."
tures I have not been initiated, he "As long as the Student Non-
explaned. Violent Coordinating Committee
explained. and other organizations were oper-
Local Talent Employed ating chiefly in the South and
"The poverty money is used to were working for Negro voting
hire caseworkers and other pro- rights, he noted, everyone support-
fessions from the outisde. Talent- ed them. Now that they have mov-
ed local people are also hired, ed to the urban ghetto, it is a
thus giving them a vested interest different story," Hayden claimed.
in the status quo. The society Hayden suggests, as a strate-
which provides poverty money gy, the construction of new, "peo-
wants to maintain the existing ple's institutions. By taking over
structure. It is hoped that, by hir- institutional control, the people of
ing these local people, they, then, the ghetto can prove their own le-
will not instigate any real changes gitimacy as a group with power to
that would upset the structure," control their own affairs.
Hayden said., "This does not mean that a dia-
Hayden then discussed existing logue between the members of the

existing institution and the people
of the slums should not continue.
But the dialogue is carried on from
a position of power, power held
because of local political and eco-
nomic control.
Toward this end, Hayden sug-
gested:
* Providing legitimate defense
in the courts, thus using this out-
let as a voice;
* Raising tax money in the
area;
* Starting cooperative stores,
thus insurancing the return of cap-
ital to the community, and
* Decentralizing police and wel-
fare organizations and employing
local citizens whenever possible.

(Continued from Page 1)
Martha Cook, '67, outgoing Pan-
hellenic Association President,
commented that "If SGC goes
against Cinema Guild we are in
essence going against the entire
University. Since the individual
student can choose not to see the
films, he should also have the

right to choose to see them."
According to Bruce Kahn, '68, a
council member, "if we give in be-
cause of outside pressures we've
given up our institutional freedom
and there is nothing left to bal-
ance against academic freedom."

DIAL 5-6290

Savio Says No Justification
For More Demonstrations

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"More demonstrations on the
University campus may not be
justified," even if the present pres-
idential commissions fail to give
anything but "vague platitudes,"
Mario Savio, former leader of the
Berkeley Free Speech Movement,
said recently.
"Will you be justified in more
deinonstrations? I'm not so sure,"
Savio said. "And I think every
student must really ask himself,"
he told an interviewer from WCBN,
the campus radio station, in Cali-
fornia last week.
Savio stated that "students who
only take a part when it's excit-
ing, " and who "aren't around to
follow through," can lend nothing
to the meaning of a demonstration.
'Vested Interest'
"Your administration," Savio re-
marked, "has a strong vested in-
terest in commissions coming out
with only the vaguest platitudes."
He said, "unless students take in-
terest at this point," nothing val-
uable will come of the commis-
sions.
Savio referred to three commis-
sions created by University Presi-
dent Harlan Hatcher and imple-
mented this semester to consider
problems in the role of student
decision-making, regulations ban-
ning sit-ins on campus and coop-
eration with the Selective Service.
"Your Regents, like ours, are
the worst sort of autocrats." Savio
stereotyped them "as nothing but
businessmen.
"All they know is stocks and
bonds."
Savio contended that the ad-
ministration, here, w will do as
little as possible to open up chan-
nels in governing the university."
He said Regents and administra-
tors will use "bribery, pressure,
vicious conniving."
'Prevent Democratization'
"The administration has a very
keen interest in preventing what-
ever democratization of university
government can be prevented,"
Savio said.
He felt there should be areas
in which students "should have
complete control." He cited the
dorms as an example, and stated
that it is not "inappropriate" that
students share a large .part in the
niaking of the university's aca-
demic decisions.
Savio claimed "there are appro-
priate forms of student participa-
tion in setting the curriculum,
but faculty members are unwill-
ing to admit this."
He went on to say, "'It's been
our feelings that there are prob-
ably no areas where the adminis-
tration should make all the regu-
lations, and probably no areas
which it should dominate."

Savio called the presence of po-
lice on campus a chronic problem
and said that they "have come to
be as common as deans." He said
a necessary part of university gov-
ernment is the insurance that a
'mechanism' be established where-
by "police could be effectively kept
from the campus."
Savio placed little value on fac-
ulty asistarice, saying that al-
though they voted an 'acceptable
resolution in Berkeley they never
"follow through" to initiate it.
"Unfortunately," Savio remarked,
"we've discovered that many fac-
ulty members who voted for it
were voting for peace.'

INCLUDING
BEST
PICTURE
AND
BEST
ACTOR

1

I

Cinema IU
presents I
JULIE CHRISTIE'S
Academy Award
Winning Performance
DARLING
Also starring
LAWRENCE HARVEY
DIRK BOGARDE

I

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,

II

FRIDAY
and
SATURDAY
Auditorium A
Angell Hall

7 and
9:15 p.m.

50e

I.D. Required

.--m..

I

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David Hemmings
Sarah Miles
*Time Magazine.Newsweek, Saturday CO LOR
Review, Lie Magazine, ETY.. The
New Yorker, Commonweal, the A Premier Productions Co., Inc. Release
New Republic, The Village Voice, Recommended for mature audiences
The New leader.

I

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Tonight
"BLACK FOREST"
Boris Korloff and Lon Chaney

STARTS
THURSDAY

"GOLDRUSH" Charlie Chaplin
"THE GREAT CHASE" W. C. Fields
SESQUIGRAS FILM FESTIVAL
Union Ballroom 8:00 P.M. 50c

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Career Minded?
ALL STATE

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Is Interviewing-February 28,

IT E WALTER READE JR/JOSEPH STRICK PRODUCTION

Everybody loves Georgy-
she's staying for the
7th hilarious week!
"SUPERIOR OFF-BEAT, AND
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j3MeS cMSON aRNW-Ll(NpeRv
SUGGESTED FOR MATURE AUDIENCES
WEDNESDAY, 7, 9

Please contact placement office
for further details.

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For A Very Merry
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Admittance will be denied to all under 18 years of age.
ALL SEATS RESERVED-ORDER BY MAlL
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