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February 11, 1967 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-02-11

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:'.PAGE TWO.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 1967

- PAGE TWO THE MICHIGAN DAILY SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 1967

FILMS
'Zorba' Displays Love of Life
Through Skillful Performances

A ifie': Trapped Between
Paradoxical Generations'

rI

-- ,

By DAVID MELLINGER 1
'Zorba the Greek" remains a
highly enjoyable film, even on the
third or fourth viewing. New evi-
dences of producer-director Mi-
chael Cacoyannis' skill reveal
themselves each time, with a har-
monious and effective blend of
photography and music continual-
ly reinforcing skillful perform-
ances.
Zorba, superbly portrayed by
Anthony Quinn, is the personifi-
cation of voluptuous, uninhibited
freedom. The beauty of his per-
sonality lies in the fact that his
is the ideal combination of human
sensitivity and animal impulse.
His personality is in contrast to
those of the English writer (Alan
Bates) and the people of the
small Cretan village where the
latter is trying, with Zorba's as-
sistance, to resurrect his father's
mine holdings. The Englishman
"thinks too much"; he is too cere-
bral, unable to do more than ex-
perience "agony" in situations
where his impulses should have
moved him to act.
The villagers, on the other hand,
often respond completely as ani-
mals, greedy and brutal, whose
bestiality, when it builds up to a
certain intensity in their bellies.
bursts forth in acts like the ston-
ing of the unyielding young wi-
dow (Maria Pappas). Zorba avoids
such hostility only because he is
'a little bit mad." When his misery
or elation is too great tq bear, he
dances.
Particularly skillful performan-
ces were given by both the widows.
Maria Pappas, held high in esteem
for her performances in Cacoyan-
nis' film versions of several Greek
Phone 482-2056
CFREE HEATERS

tragedies, maintains in this firm jof the photography and the Greek

the intensity and precision of
Greek tragic dreams. Lila Kedrova,
the other female lead, is sensitive
and excellent in her portrayal of
Bubulina, the played-out, senti-
mental Madame de France who
keeps the village's perennially-
empty Hotel Ritz.
Zorba is filmed on location in
Crete, and the flavor of the island
fills the background by means both

folk score by Mikis Theodorakis.
Photography director Walter La-
sally utilizes the austere landscape
of the country and its people well
to reinforce the plot.
Cacoyannis and Quinn pay an
energetic tribute to life; both ar-
tistically and technically, their
compliment is a fine production
with musical variance and thea-
trical celebration.

ORGANIZATION NOTICES
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USE OF THIS COLUMN FOR AN-
NOUNCEMENTS is available to officially
recognized and registered student or-
ganizations only. Forms are available
in Room 1011 SAB.
* *
Folk Dance Club (WAA), Folk dance,
Mon., Feb. 13, 8:30-10:30 p.m., Women's
Athletic Bldg.
Lutheran Student Chapel, Hil St. at
Forest Ave., Sun., Feb. 12, Wrship
service at,9:30 and 11 a.m.; 6 p.m. sup-
per followed by program at 7 p.m.,

"The Challenge of Existentialism to
Theology," Prof. Ray Elevton, Eastern
Michigan University.
Gamma Delta, Sun., Feb. 12, meet
at University Lutheran Chapel, 1511
Washtenaw, at 5:45 p.m. to go to Luth-
eran Student Chapel, 801 S. Forest, for
supper and program: Prof. Ray Elevton
of EMU, "The Challenge of Existential-
ism to Theology."
* * *
Young Democratic Club, Open meet-
ing to canvass voters for student can-
didate for City Council, Sat.. Feb. 11,
1:15 p.m., 706 Oakland (basement apt.).

By MARGARET WARNER
Alfie doesn't know what love is
the way "birds (girls) talk about
it." He doesn't like making anyonef
unhappy if he can help it. And, he
lives for himself. Predictably
enough, he has a mystic attraction
for women. "Take me as I am or.
not at all. It don't do to get de-
pending."
From the number of girls that
Alfie takes on in the first fifteen
minutes of the film, the viewer
would exepect it to be a fairly
clever addition to a now well-
established genre of English com-I
edy-uninhibited, mod, and im-
mensely funny.
However, in spite of Alfie's de-
tachment from life, his alienation,
and his staunch belief in free love,
he isn't quite mod. In fact, he
wears respectable suits and reads
religious poetry to his illegitemate
son.
Low Humor
All humor has a base of sadness.
But for a situation to be funny,
the audience must remain de-
tached. About the same time that
I lost track of the number of girls
that Alfie had conquered, the
humor in "Alfie" began hitting
below the belt.
If the object of the film were
to glorify the madcap life of an
uninhibited generation, A l f i e
wouldn't even encounter women
over thirty-five. And, he certainly
wouldn't seduce the devoted wifer
of a middle aged tubercular pa-j
tient. Alfie arranges an abortion,
and sees his own dead child. Alfie
is still funny at the end of the
movie, but the audience can't
laugh with the same freedom.

Michael Cain plays the part of
Alfie perfectly. The character,
which might otherwise be hard to
accept, becomes eminently plaus-
ible as Cain narrates scene after
scene with complete detachment
and a delightful cockney accent.
The photography is not meant
to be experimental. The plot moves
too much too quickly for photo-
graphy to be the center of atten-
tion. Nevertheless, the shots are
masterfully done, capturing the
action of the film from every con-
ceivably angle-whether from high
above a courtyard or through a
row of diapers on the line. The
composite still shots depicting each
of the actors at the end of the
film are particularly notable.
The jazz background music in
"Alfie" parallels Alfie's alienation
and lies somewhere between the
younger and the older generations.
Our generation demands that we
tell life as it is. "Alfie" does just
that. Alfie epitomizes much of the
alienation of the younger genera-
tion, yet he can't be separated
from the responsibilities and needs
of an older generation. He is ra-
pidly becoming a part of it. In the
end he says "I ain't got my peace
of mind. And if you ain't got that,
you ain't got nothing. What's it
all about? You know what I
mean."
Join
The Daily'

TON IGHT
TOMORROW
SMILES
OF A
SUMMER
NIGHT
Comedy by the
Scandinavian
meister--Bergman
dir. Ingmar
Bergman, 1955
Swedish, subtitles.
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8:00 P.M.

Second Baptist Church, Fourth and Beakes Streets

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MICHIGAN DAILY

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DEAN AN
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presents
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