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February 07, 1967 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-02-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE TEN

THE MICHIGAN DAILY"

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 196 7

PAGE TEN TIlE MICHIGAN DAILY TUESDAY. FEBRUARY 7,1967

SECURITY MEASURES TAKEN:
Stolen U.S. Goods Revive Black Market;
Arrests in Saigon Port Rise Sharply

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EDITOR'S NOTE: In November, ;
the Associated Press had a series
of articles detailing the losses of
U.S. funds caused by black market-
ing and corruption in Vietnam.
This is a followup on the situation
as it exists today.
By FRED S. HOFFMAN
Associated Press Staff Writer
SAIGON () - The downtown
black market, driven off the
streets with great show last year,
is back in full swing-riding the
crest of buying for the lunar New j
York holiday.
Hundreds of rickety stalls-
many rigged with GI rain ponchos
for shelter-crowd the main boule-
vards from which the open air
market was expelled by the Viet-
namese police in mid-November.
The Vietnamese police have is-
sued public warnings. But U.S. of-
ficials say they do not expect the
police to act until after the Tet
New Year celebration, biggest on
the Vietnamese calendar, begin-
ning Thursday.
Various Items
The stalls are stacked with
clothing, some of it olive drab, with
canned foods, radios, cigarette
lighters, liquor, batteries, medical
suplies, blankets and thousands
of other items.
American military officials say
that many of the items on the
black market actually are clever
copies of American goods or were
stolen many months ago, before
tight controls were applied.
However, the Saigon Chamber
of Commerce said it had conducted
a study and found that stolen
American beer was flooding the
open markets in Saigon and other
major cities.
The chamber study estimates
that about one million cans a
month are sold on the black
market.
Protests
The chamber and other business
group protest that damage is done
to legitimate commerce by the

sale of black, market goods at?
lower prices.
Much of the goods on the stalls
obviously is not military in origin,
but apparently came out of the;
$455 million in U.S.-financed com-
modities pumped into the Viet-
namese economy last year.
Officials of the U.S. Agency for
International Development stick
to a claim that only about 5 or 6{
per cent of all U.S.-paid-for eco-
nomic commodities are stolen or
otherwise diverted.
But Sen. Ernest Gruening, (D-
Alaska), recently pegged the fig-
ure attaround 20 per cent-which'
was the estimate offered by most
of the sources interviewed by As-
sociated Press reporters last fall
in a survey of corruption and
thievery in Vietnam.
The AID agency's own figures,
distributed in Washington, con-
ceded losses up to 20 per cent for
clothing, food products, fertilizer,
and certain other comhmodities
given directly to the Vietnamese
government for refugee aid, revo-
lutionary development, and other
programs.
A top U.S. investigator said the
Saigon port is one of the most
noticeable areas of improvement.
The Vietnamese government has
shaken up its port director's of-
fice, Brig. Gen. Pham Dang Lan
has been replaced as director-gen-
eral by a civilian, public works
I secretary Truong Van Thuan. "Il
think they have their first team
in now," said an American work-
I ing to straighten out the port,
problem.
Security in the dock area and in
the river has been strengthened
within the past few months and
the Army's 125th Transportation
Command has instituted new sc-
urity measures:
-Stationary checkpoints have
been established on theimmediate
watr approaches to the harbor.
Here cargo barges are spot-check-

ed as they move away from
freighters being unloaded in mid-
stream.
-Motor patrol boats rove con-
stantly between the checkpoints,
watching for signs of transfer of
goods by bargemen to boats run by
gangs of thieves.
Combat Police
-Two companies of Vietnamese
combat police have been ordered
to patrol some of the areas across
the river from Saigon, including
a peninsula which long has been a
smugglers' hangout.
But the security screen still can
be penetrated.
Vietnamese police arrested mem-
bers of what they said was a ring
of racketeers including several port
employes and military deserters.
The leader of the ring, police
said, confessed to stealing 80 cases
of whisky, many bolts of cloth,
60 cases ofssewing machine oil
and 10 cases of transformers.
Transfer of the goods took place
in the middle of the Saigon River,
police were told.
Arrests have been rising sharply.

Capt. Nguyen Tan Quoc. chief of
the port police, reported that near-
ly 3,400 thieves had been caught
in the commercial port last year
-60 per cent more than 1965.
In the immediate dock and
warehouse area, U.S. police have
installed new lights, barbed wire
fances and a pass and badge sys-
tem for workers.
U.S. soldiers are stationed as
checkers in every warehouse. They
monitor the cargo when it arrives
and at intervals throughout its
stay. Similar checking is donea
aboard ships moored in the harbor
and at the docks.
U.S. Military Police command-
ers travel about on regular jeep
tours of the warehouses, making
sure the Vietnamese know we areI
around and shed workers see them.
"We want them to know we're
around," one MP officer said.
Once on the road, the commer-
cial goods are still open to plunge,.
Late in January, Vietnamese
police intercepted two truckloads
of radios and typewriters. .

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near Huron, in Ann Arbor

Open Monday-Saturday 10 A.M.-6 P.M.

What you do on
February 15,16.
may affect
the rest of your life!

W.A.A. ACTIVITY NEWS
RIDING CLUB
Manager-Diana Craig-665-5106
Horse Show-March 12 at the Stony Ridge ;tables, West Liberty Road at 7 P.M.
BASKETBALL CLUB
Manager-Nancy Davidson-764-5814
Practice Schedule-Monday 8-10 P.M.
Barbour Gym-Thursday 7-9 P.M.
GAME SCHEDULE (Home games played at Waterman gym)
Thursday, Feb. 9 M.S.U. at U of M-7 P.M.
Saturday, Feb. 18 Western at U of M--10 A.M.
Monday, Feb. 20 Eastern at U of M-7 PM
Saturday, Feb. 25 ARFMCW Conference at M.S.U.
Saturday, March 1] Adrian at U of M
SWIM TEAM
Captain-Lynn Allison-764-7921
The team is composed of 14 swimmers and divers. The team won all their dual swimming meets
for the 7th year in a row. This year they defeated Wayne, Eastern, and M.S.U. The chlorine flew
as they captured the Women's Collegiate Swimming o-d Diving Championships. U of M has won
this meet ever since they began this conference.
MICHIFISII
Manager-Sandy Legan-663-5663
The first six weeks of each semester are busy as the club conducts tryouts for prospective mem-
bers.
At the M.S.U. joint swim meet last year, Michifish members swam away with top honors in duet,
trio and stunt competition.
The club is currently preparing for their annual spring water show to be presented at the Mar-
garet Bell Pool March 30, 31, and April 1. They are also looking forward to the IAAA and AAU
competition in the spring.

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RIFLERY CLUB
Manager-Mary Lou Lawrence-764-2962
The club is currently preparing for NRA competition.
FIELD HOCKEY CLUB

Manager-Penny Carver-662-5242
Results of fall competition
Eastern 2
Western 5
Albion 0
Central 2
M.S.U. 2

Michigan 0
Michigan 4
Michigan 4
Michigan 2
Michigan 4

That's when the IBM interviewer will be on
campus. When he'd like to talk with you-
whatever your area of study, whatever your
plans after graduation.
You'll find job opportunities at IBM in six ma-
jor areas: Computer Applications, Program-
ming, Finance and Administration, Research

and Development, Manufacturing and Mar-
keting.
Some of these areas may not mean much to
you-now. But just let the IBM interviewer
explain a few of them. One may be just the
career you're looking for. It could be the start
of something big-your future with IBM.
IBM

MODERN DANCE CLUB
Manager-Michele Levine-663-2186
SQUARE DANCE CLUB
Manager-Karen Bonwit-764-7985
Square dances are held every first and third Friday night at Barbour gymnasium.
JUDO CLUB
Manager-Mary Wakefield-663-6561

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