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February 07, 1967 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-02-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 1967

WH . MIVUIre N *n)IL T%7

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TUSAFBU R ,97A RM 11111inZEA~ti1 J1-Ej UN'MVdXffiA.TNbA 111Y .

PAGE NINE

9:

Clay.
Retains Title
By Deeision
By D e s olBy The As~oiated Press
HOUSTON-Cassius Clay turn-
ed butcher and gave big Ernie
Terrell a savage bloody beating
yesterday for a unanimous 15-
round decision that removed all
doubts about his rights to the un-
disputed world heavyweight title.
Terrell, recognized as champ by
the World Boxing Association af-
ter it withdrew its recognition of
Clay, was a slow-moving, easy
target for the speedy Clay who
battered him around both eyes.
Terrell's right eye was closed to
a narrow slit from the fourth
round on and he bled off and on
from a sliced right eyebrow after
the seventh.
Big Ernie, from Chicago and
Atlantic City, N.J., never went
down but he never was in it.
Clay taunted Terrell and asked
"What's my name?" in the eight
and ninth as he gave the 6-foot-6
Terrell the same kind of beating
he had handed ex-champ Floyd
Patterson at Las Vegas, Nev., in
1965.
Patterson was a TKO victim,
but Terreli went the route with-
out hitting the deck.
Terrell had called Clay by his
given name at a meeting during
the publicity buildup for the fight
and refused to use the Muslim
name, Muhammad All, that Clay
prefers.
It was the 28th straight victory
for the unbeaten, 25-year-old Clay
who announced Saturday he was
moving to Houston as his latest
adopted city.
Referee Harry Kessler scored the
fight 148-138, Judge Jimmie Webb
had it 148-133 and Judge Ernie
Taylor. The AP card was 149-136,
giving Terrell only one-round-
the second by a shade.
"I wanted to knock him out
after eight, but he wouldn't go,"
Clay said.
The champion added: "He just
stood there taking my punches,
hoping to tire me out. But he ,.
didn't hurt me. I don't have any
scratches on me."
Terrell, acknowledged ,as a left
Jab artist, fought with both hands
high in the peek-a-boo style Pat-
terson used to use.
Clay found it hard to pierce
that defense in the first few
rounds but soon found his target.
Ernie halso had trouble unleash-
ing his fine left jab from that
position and concentrated more on
wild right hand punches to the
body.
If there was any doubt about
this fight, it. vanished in the sev-
enth round when Clay threw bar-
rage _after ,barrage at Terrell,
opening the cut over his right eye.
Still, in the final seconds of the
round, big Ernie threw a desperate,
long right hand that clipped Clay.
Cassius never was hurt or
shaken up although he taunted
Terrell and invited him to throw
the left at his chin.
Cassius played the cat and
mouse game with his foe, even
outdoing him when they resorted
to wrestling tactics in the early
rounds.
QUCK

DEON FLESSNER, Illinois' top
rebounder, will be lost the re-
mainder of the basketball season
with a back injury, Coach Harry
Combes said yesterday.
Flessner fell flat on his back!
during' the Northwestern game
Saturday and was carried from the
floor. Combes said X-rays showed
a fracture of the transverse proc-
ess in the lower vertebrae.
BOBBY DODD, a star quarter-
back at Tennessee who became
one of the country's top football
coaches, retired as coach at Geor-
gia Tech yesterday.
The 58-year-old Dodd, whose
Yellow Jackets won 165 games and
went to 13 bowls during, his 22-
year reign, will remain as ath-
letic director. No replacement as
coach was named immediately.
The Detroit Lions of the Na-
tional Football League announced
yesterday the signing "of BILL Me-
PEAK as offensive backfield coach.
Head Coach Joe Schmidt said Mc-
Peak, former head coach with the
Washington Redskins, will report
March 1 for fulltime' duty.

Takes

15

to

Trounce

Terrell

Hockey King in Copper Country,

By JOHN SUTKUS
CK is too far south of Houghton
and doesn't come in, or they just
don't listen. Cause it's Copper,
Country, brother, where winter
and hockey are king.l
Everywhere billboards proclaim,
"Welcome to the Copper Country.
You are now breathing the Clean-
est Air on Earth." Well, the clean-
est air maybe, but downtown
Houghton could keep a good urban
renewal man busy for a few years.
Nearly every business has the
ad line, "Serving the Copper Coun-
try for years." Even the milk bears
the copper label.
'And it's beer-drinking country
too. Back when Houghton was a
town of 3,900 the local population
managed to keep 58 bars going.

CASSIUS CLAY

The residents haven't cut down
on consumption any, but they have
quit taking a bar census lately.
Hockey Country
It's big time hockey country up
there. Michigan Tech's Huskies
have been a national hockey power
for years. They have turned out
a list of All Americas that fills
the "Huskies' Den," a MUG-type
combined sports tradition-atmos-
phere room which is next to, of
course, the Douglas House Bar.
Naturally, with all this back-
ground, Tech hockey fans don't
make ordinary crowds. In years
past, Houghton fans have been
known to carry the fight against
visiting teams right to the ice.
But for the most part, they re-
main vocal about it, with no limit
on the decibel level.
As Tech coach John MacInnes
puts it, "These are real good fans.
You're not going to fool them.
They've come to expect the very
best in collegiate hockey and we
have to give it to them. We try
to schedulehtough teams here at
home for them."
Skinning Tradition
He might have added, but he
didn't have to, that Tech has a
tradition of skinning anybody who
steps into their rink.
He did say, though, "I thought
they saw a tremendous series here
this weekend," referring to the
Winter Carnival set-to with Mich-
igan.
Even two great games couldn't
make them completely happy,
though. They are still burning

BIG TEN ROUNDUP:
Indiana' Surprises MSU

from the fire marshall's decision
that Dee Stadium, often called
that old gray barn," can hold
only 1450 fans for a hockey game.
After the game started Friday
night, the first thing Tech Sports
Information Director Tom Green-
hoe said was, "Gee, this place
seems empty." Alternate Huskie
goalie Rick Best echoed, "It's so
quiet in here it's like a tomb."
Every seat in the house was taken
and there was a line of faces in
the balconies, but Houghton is-not
an ordinary town.
But for all their disagreement,
most fans agree that the decision
is for the best. Dee was built in
1926, and everything in it except
for the ice and a few spindly steel
roof- supports is made of wood-
the kind of old stuff that would
go up in a hurry with a spark.
First on the list of public improve-
ments in Houghton will undoubt-
edly be a new rink.
Below Par
Even the GreataControversy
cannot hide the fact that this
season's Huskie squad has been
performing somewhat below what
was expected. Currently they hold
down fourth place in the WCHA
with a 7-5-1 record.
"I've been disappointed with
this team," says MacInnes. "I
can't hide that. We're a sopho-
more-senior squad. There is only
one junior. Our seniors are vet-
erans of two WCHA champions
and an NCAA champion. We
should have plenty enough experi-
ence on the team."
The Huskies have one of the
tightest-defenses in the WCHA-
thanks to Best and Tony Esposito,
two parts in the outstanding her-

itage of goalkeepers Tech has
spawned. Yet the team hovers only
two games from the .500 mark and
the Friday loss to Michigan struck
a big blow to their fading hopes
for a title.
Bad Bounces
"We just haven't got the boun-
ces," says Esposito. "It's like that.
When you're doing well, they all
go you're way."
"We got the breaks for two
years," added MacInnes.. "Maybe
now they're trying to get even
with us."
Even with the troubles, the fans
have not abandoned their team.
"We're not in the business of feed-
ing the pros," MacInnes calmly
states.
"We're hoping you will do a
good job of softennig up North
Dakota," says Greenhoe, referring
to the Feb. 24-25 series in Ann
Arbor. "We have them here the
next week."
Looking even further into the
future, MacInnes says, "If both
teams skate up to theirkpotential,
we should have one heckuva play-
off game here in March."
Scores
COLLEGE BASKETBALL
Maine 97, Boston University 89
West Virginia State 75, Concord 70
Holy Cross 78, Massachusetts 65
Kentucky 79, Mississippi 70
Vanderbilt 51, Georgia Tech (ovt)
Florida 82,. Alabama 50
West Virginia 81, Pittsburgh 62
Virginia Tech 78, Geo. Washington 70
Central Michigan 69, Hinsdale 64
Georgia Tech 81, Jacksonville 71
COLLEGE HOCKEY
New Hampshire 5, Army 4 (ovt)
NBA
Baltimore 107, St. Louis 98

UNION-LEAGUE

See the REAL EUROPE and Save
Buy, rent, or lease a car through
CAR TOURS IN EUROPE, INC.
European factory prices on car of your choice
... Complete package available inc. shipping,
insurance, etc.
... Special student lease plan
Call campus rep. 665-4229
fichigaz Union and Michilgan League
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OPEN PETITIONING
for
University Actizvities Center
SENIOR OFFICERS
1967-68

Petitions available 2nd floor Union and
3rd floor league. DUE FEB. 19.

By The Associated Press
BLOOMINGTON -Indiana

hit

55 per cent from the field and
came from behind in the second
half to beat Michigan State 82-77
last night and move into a tie with
Northwestern for the Big Ten
basketball lead.
A three-point play by Vern
Payne with 13:25 to play put the
Hoosiers in front at 53-52, and
they led the rest of the way. They
built up an 80-70 lead with 2:23
left and went to a control game.
Indiana hit 31 of 56 shots from
the field. The Spartans got more

I

Big Ten Standings

11

shot but made only 30 of 76.
Michigan State spurted late in
the first half to take a 48-43 lead
after trailing at 26-17. Indiana
caught up again in the first five
minutes of the second half.
Er Inniger led the Hoosiers with
24 points. Matthew Aitch topped
Michigan State with 20. ,
OSU Wins, 80-74
COLUMBUS - Ohio State's
Buckeyes found Northern Michi-
gan's NAIA basketball entry a bit
more than a breather last night
but prevailed 80-74 behind the
sharp-shooting of Ron Sepic and
Steve Howell.
The Bucks, in their last break
from Big Ten competition, shot 50
per cent from the field and took
4:9 rebounds to the Wildcats' 31,
and needed all of this to win.
OSU led 39-32 at halftime, but
Northern's Les Coduti, who topped
all scorers with 24 points, hit a
long shot and Howell simultane-
ously fouled Conrad Yagodzinski,
who converted two tosses and cut
the difference to 76-72 with' 1:12
left.
Four free throws restored the
Bucks to safety before Coduti hit
again just before the game's end.
Sepic made 8 of 12 field shots
and Howell 7 of 10 as a substi-
tute. Sepic and Bill Hosket, with!
10 free throws, shared Ohio State
point laurels at 18.

1-

WCIIA

St a ndings

W L Pet.
Northwestern 4 1 .800
Indiana 4 1 .800
Michigan State 3 2 .600
Illinois 3 2 .600
Ohio State 3 3 .500
Iowa 2 2 .500
Wisconsin 2 .3 .400
Purdue . 2 3 .400
MICHIGAN 2 4 .333
Minnesota 1 5 .167
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Indiana 82, Michigan State 77
Ohio State 80, No. Michigan 74
TODAY'S GAMES
Illinois at Iowa
Hawaii at Purdue -

It's in the CARDS at
1203 South University
OPE N TONIGHT TILL 9

1

MICHIGAN
North Dakota
Denver
Mich. Tech
Mich. State
Minn. (Duluth)
Colorado Coll.
Minnesota

11
7
6
5
4
3

i

L
2
3
5
5
8
7
12

T
0
0
0
1
1
0
0

Pct.
;800
.786
.583
.577
.406
.385
.364
.200

I A

FRIDAY'S RESULTS
MICHIGAN 3, Michigan Tech 2.
Michigan State 6, Minnesota 4.
Denver 9, North Dakota 4.
SATURDAY'S RESULTS
Michigan Tech 3, MICHIGAN 1.
Michigan State 6, Minnesota 3.
North Dakota 4, Colorado Col-
lege 2.
Minnesota (Duluth) 6, Wiscon-
sin 1. '
'I

A

ATTENTION: Accounting Students!
THE
U NITE D
STATES is scheduled to recruit
STATES
GENERAL ON CAMPUS
ACCOUNTING February 20, 1961
OFFICE
Register with your placement office
for an interview for civil service positions as
*" Accountants * Auditors
Interesting-challenging-diversified employment
An equal opportunity employer

V

T

NATIONAL TEACHER EXAMINATIONS

L

i

How soon after graduation
will somebody let you,
run a bank?
Before you're thirty, maybe. If you're good enough.
That's preciselywhat happened with Del Ross.
He's the manager of our Forest Hills office.
Responsible for 2500 accounts. $2.9 million
in deposits.
Then there's the international scene to con-
sider. We're going to need an even larger team of
young bankers overseas within the next few years.
Of course, everybody doesn't get to run
a Chemical NewYork office. Here or abroad.

This week, explore
engineering
opportunities
as big as today's
brand new ocean
Talk with on-campus Career Consultant from Newport News
-world's largest shipbuilding company-involved with
nuclear propulsion, aircraft carrier design, submarine build-
ing, oceanographic development, marine automation, all
the challenging advances on today's brand new ocean. The
New York TIMES calls this "the last earthbound frontier"
with "profit possibilities as big as the sea."
Learn what our half-a-billion-dollar order backlog means to
you in terms of high starting salary and years of career
security with no lid on your future. With orders up
$80,000,000 in five months, our need is urgent for imagina-
tive men in all the disciplines listed here. Men who like
tough challenges and individual responsibility.
Ask about opportunities for advanced degrees and research.
'We're next door to VirginiaAssociated Research Center with
one of the world's largest synchrocyclotrons, where grad-
uate engineers study high energy physics. We're across the
harbor from Old Dominion College, offering graduate
courses in Microwave Theory, Solid State Electronics, Nu-
clear Engineering. Nearby, too, is the Extension Division
of the University of Virginia offering courses toward credits
for masters degrees. And within easy driving is The Vir-
ginia Institute for Scientific Research, a world leader in
solid state physics. Linked up with these opportunities,
Newport News offers scholarships, tuition grants, advanced
study and research leaves. Ask about them.
Get the facts on pleasant living and lower living costs here
in the heart of Virginia's seaside vacationland with its su-
perb beaches, golf, fishing, boating, hunting.
IMMEDIATE ENGINEERING CAREER OPENINGS

A
L
E
N
T
I
H

u
D
A
Y
F
I
B
14,

D
A
Y

Mechanical Engineers
Electrical Engineers
Marine Engineers
Industrial Engineers

Naval Architects
Nuclear Engineers
Civil Engineers
Metallurgical Engineers

::: r. : as

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