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February 05, 1967 - Image 8

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The Michigan Daily, 1967-02-05

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WAGE EIGHT

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 5. 1967

PAGE ETGHT TIlE MIChIGAN DAILY SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 5,1967

BERKELEY ACTIVIST PROFILE:
Predict Savio Rem

UAW Fissure With

- '-,~---~-----~ ~ -~

EDITOR'S NOTE: He isn't a stu-
dent at Berkeley now, but he's still
a big man on campus. To many a
young firebrand at the huge univer-
sity, Mario Savio remains a per-
suasive and fearless spokesman for
students' rights. Others view him
as a troublemaker. Here's a closeup
of an activist who has specialized
in keeping things stirred up.
By HAROLD V. STREETER
BERKELEY, Calif. (A')-A big
man on the University of Califor-
nia's Berkeley campus is a, part
time bartender at the Steppen-
wolf. Tavern. Gov. Ronald Reagan
may never have heard of the
Steppenwolf, but he has heard of
the bartender.
The bartender may soon be
heard again.
As a philosophy major, in 1964,
he lashed out at rules barring
campus fund collections for civil
rights, helped topple a chancellor
and sparked nearly 800 mass ar-
rests.
As a non-student, barred from
school for deliberately violating
campus rules, Savio helped whip
up a furor over Navy recruiting at
the student union last November.
For that demonstration, Savio and
four other non-students were con-
victed last Saturday of creating
a public nuisance, but immediately
filed notice of appeal.
Tending bar is only an inter-
lude in bushy-haired slender, 24-
year-old Mario Savio's career, just
a means of supporting his wife,
the former Suzanne Goldberg, and
their 1-year-old son.
Those who know his potential
asks, "What's next?"
Savio isn't saying publicly.

The reporter introduced him-
self.
Cocking his head to one side-
his plentiful hair in unusual dis-
array-Savio said::
"You are from the Associated
Press, right?
"And you wish an interview
right?
"The answer is no."
And he quietly shut the door.
Just who is Mario Savio? What
makes him tick?
He is a brain; he found college
physics so easy he gave it up.
He is very articulate; what he
says, and the way he says it, have
galvanized hearers into action.
He is an "activist." He has gone
to jail and been beaten up for
doing what he believes in.
When Savio followed his par-
ents west in 1963, he brought to
the University of California an
overage college grade of 3.9 out
of a possible 4.
On an October day in 1964, Savio'
climbed atop a campus police car
at Berkeley and made a speech.
Inside was a nonstudent, arrested
for violating campus rules against
political activity.
Then under suspension with
seven others for breaking campus
rules, Savio said:
"Chancellor Edward S t r o n g
must say no to the suspensions.
"And I'm publicly serving notice
that we're going to-continue direct
action until they accede."
The suspensions stuck, but the
crisis forced Strong's retirement,
brought President Kerr into con-
ference with leaders of a student
Free Speech Movement, and re-

amns uampus V 01ce AFL-CIO
Overnight, students s t a r t e d In the summer of 1964, he went
wearing punched cards on coats to McComb, Miss, to.persuade Ne- By A. F. MAHAN
and dresses by way of saying an groes to register to vote and was Associated Press News Analyst
'individual's personality can be beaten u by angrv townsmen.

Possible

swalowed up by a computerized '

I

existence.
After the new Berkeley chan-
cellor, Roger Heyns, broke up a
class boycott over the November
recruiting uproar and refused to
consult Savio, the campus in-
fluence of the non-student pro-
testor was made evident.
Savio told 500 demonstrators
there should be a fusion of polit-
ical radicals and the "hippies"-
groups known for unorthodox ways
and gaudy attire.
Quickly students appeared on
campus wearing eye masks and
singing the Beatles's Yellow Sub-
marine song.
ISavio is an activist.

G

Prior to the Berkeley crises. he DETROIT - The hyphen in
was arrested as a participant in "AFL-CIO" has served since its
a sit-in at the Sheraton-Palace founding as a reminder that the
Hotel in San Francisco, staged to two major houses of labor never
promote the hiring of Negroes. have completely resolved their
What's in his future? differences.
Now the AFL-CIO's largest
Says an authoritative spokes- union, the Union Auto Workers, is
man on the Berkeley campus: threatening to erase the hyphen,
"Savio is a forceful speaker. which also has welded two one-
With his voice, the Free Speech time bitter enemies into the most
Movement drew a lot of support, powerful labor force in history.
both student and faculty. Without Te e-rin Extive
it, the FSM died. Without it, the Board of the UAW Friday directed
free student union never got off its four top officers to resign their
the floor. Without it, the Vietnam itons th the AFL-CIO Ehe-
day committee managed a few cutive Counci btheutsted short
protest parades and then faded. outi nlreak.
"You just don't encounter a of a final break.
'' Review Relationship
*in. S.L tui ~SK~~.' voice like A afl.. &UAv.l io's X.J. 4 ften _"S.

:
,
.
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While some within the UAW
insisted Reuther would do almost f
anything to preserve the amalga-
mation, AFL-CIO sources said in
Washington they now think there
is a "distinct possibility" the UAW
will pull out.
They said they were caught
by surprise, but Meany reportedly
made no imediate overtures to
dissuade Reuther and the UAW
from their course.
He moved, instead, they said,
toward deciding who to recom-
mend for election in Reuther's
place as an AFL-CIO vice presi-
dent and executive council mem-
ber.
Still Wields Power
While Reuther and the other
officers of the UAW were told to
get out of all executive council
activities, Reuther continues as
head of the AFL-CIO's Industrial
Union department, the largest
within the parent organization
and containing most of the formerj
CIO unions.
These include the 1.2-million
United Steelworkers, the Interna-
tional Association of Machinists
and the International Union of
Electrical Workers, among others.
There is no question Reuther
is the dominant figure in this de-
partment and would want its sup-
port in any withdrawal action.
His continuance as its head also
would prevent the possible at-
tempted takeover by Meany or a

Yes, you. If you're a senior who has
decided to pursue a career in the
business world, you'll want to check
the opportunities in AEtna's
Home office and
field programs.
These are salaried positions offering
excellent potential for advancement
to management levels. Ask your
Placement Office for a copy of
the brochure, "Who, Me?"
Whileyou're there, sign
up to meet the AEtna Casualty
man who'll be on campus on
FEB. 7 and 8
AETNA LIFE
AND CASUALTY
Hartford 15, Connecticut
An Equal Opportunity Employer

/1

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17YVlc~li6~~~a. LC1K 0VVbvy uul.
However, it amended the agenda
for an April 20-22 prebargaining
convention to include discussion
Sand action on a review of its re-
lationship with the AFL-CIO, with
+ the UAW's International Execu-
A ennedy P ic evice tive Board being authorized to take
"whatever action in this regard
will best serve the interests of the
IContinued from Page 1) Further, Price says that Yar- UAW, its members and their fai-
Fairlie's charges were answered molinsky was brought to Harvard ilies, the entire labor movement
by Price in a letter to the editor by the law faculty and Moynihan and the nation as a whole."
of the Sunday Telegraph, Jan. 17. by the education faculty. "The These UAW actions climaxed
Price said that the initiative for institute," he says, "managed to months of stormy debate on policy
renaming the school for Kennedy persuade both to give it some of within the AFL-CIO's governing
and the establishment of the in- their time and interest."- Executive Council between George
stitute came from President Nath- In addition, Price explains that Meany, 73, president of the AFL-
an Pusey of Harvard. members of the institute continue CIO, and Walter P. Reuther, 60,
He explains that the "endow- to serve the Johnson administra- president of the UAW.
ment of the institute is and will tion and "are happy to do so." The threat of Reuther's 1.4-
continue to be a part of the en- According to Price, the Grad- milion member union to disaffi-{
dowment funds of the university, uate School of Public Adminis- 'iate, however, was held by several
under control of the university tration was not a "chaste" insfit in the top councils of the UAW

battle among others
job.

for the top

|

A reporter drove to Savio's sulted in rule changes.
apartment, a first floor affair with The way Savio's words get
a motorscooter parked out front, translated into action was exem-
and rang the doorbell. plified on Dec. 2, 1964, during a
"Wait a minute," a voice called massive sit-in at Sproud Hall, the
out over the crying of a baby. administration building, over the
The Savio opened the door. He campus rules fuss.
was wearing, at 1 a.m., a long, "The administration wants you
flowing bathrobe and was bare- to walk by like a machine," Savio
footed. .Isaid.

corporation."
The advisory committee, Price tion before its name was changed.'
writes, is hardly the unique fea- "Fairlie's ideal of academicj
ture that Fairlie makes it out to purity," writes Price, "seems to be
be. He explains that "each of 41 that a scholar must never dirty
of the faculties and departments his hands with the data of prac-;
of Harvard has a visiting commit- tical experience-a notion that is
tee and none of them is given'as dangerous in the social as in
authority or power." the natural sciences."

as a move which the UAW hopesI
will "turn the AFL-CIO around in!
its thinkinf."+
Of course, the latest action
leaves the way clear for Reuther1
to lead his membership out of the
AFL-CIO in April. There is no1
doubt the UAW convention will:
give him whatever he wants.

In a burst of criticism of the
AFL-CIO Executive Council last
month, the UAW said the federa-
tion "lacks the social vision, the
dynamic thrust, and the crusading
spirit that should characterize
the modern labor movement,
which can and must be, if it is to
be equal to the new challenges and
new opportunities of our 20th cen-
tury technological society."

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DAILY

OFFICI

.:: .".

The Daily Offilcal Bulletin is an 6
official puolication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editor- 1
ial responsibility. Notices should bei
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3519 Administration Bldg. be-
fore 2 p.m. of the day preceding 1
publication and by 2 p.m. Friday 1
for Saturday and Sunday. General
Notices may be published a maxi-
mum of two times on request; Day
Calendar items appear once only.
Student organization notices are not
accepted for publication. For more
information call 764-8429.
SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 5
'Day Calendar
School of Music Recital-Students of
the Wind Instrument Department: Re-
cital Hall, School of Music, 2 p.m.
School of Music Recital-Karen Keys,
CORGANI I TION
NOTICDES
USE OF THIS COLUMN FOR AN-
NOUNCEMENTS is available to officially
recognized and registered student or-
ganizations only. Forms are available
in Room 1011 SAB.
Lutheran Student Chapel, Hill St. at
Forest Ave., Sun., Feb. 5, worship
services at 9:30 and 11 a.m.; supper at
6 p.m. with ,film at 7 p.m.: "The Holy
Swindle"-dialogue between Dr. Joseph
Sittler, Chicago Divinity Schooi, and
Rev. Robert Karsten, campus pastor at
Wittenberg University.
* * *
Young Friends, "Macbird" play read-
ing, Sun., Feb. 5, 5:30 p~m., Friends
Center. 1416 Hill,
** *
Folk Dance (WAB), Folk dance, Mon.,
Feb. 6, 8:30-10:30, Women's Athletic
Bldg.
* * *
Engineering Council, Student Advis-
ory Board committee meeting, Feb. 7,
7 p.m., 206 West Engineering.
Gamma Delta, Feb. 5, supper at 6
p.m. followed by a talk by William
Steude on: "The University Student and
is Relationship to the University," 1511
Washtenaw Ave., University Lutheran
Chapel.
* * *
Newman Student Association, Mar-
riage instruction series, Feb. 5, 8 p.m.,
Newman Center, 331 Thompson.
*' * *
Hillel Foundation, Deli House, Feb. 5,
5:30 p.m., 1429 Hill. Eliezer Goldman,
instructor of philosophy at Bar-Ilan
University, Israel, will speak on "Jew-
ish Identity in Israel and in the Dia-
spora." Call 663-4129 for reservations.
* * *
Hillel Foundation, Dell House, Feb. 19,
5:30 p.m., 1429 Hill, closing date today
for reservations for Theodore Bikel.
Call 663-4129.
University Lutheran Chapel, 1511
Washtenaw, Feb. 5, 9:45 and 11:15 a~m.
services will be conducted by the Rev.
A. Scheips. Holy Communion will be
offered. Bible class at 11:15 a.m.

pianist: Rackham Lecture Hall, 4:30 p.m. La Grange Park, ill. (No. 102)-Elem.
K-6, Art, Vocal, PE, Grades 6-8-Art.{
Cinema Guild-Akira Kurasawa's "The Span./Fr., Span., Home Ec., Ind. Arts,
Lower Depts": Architecture Aud., 7 Lang. Arts/SS, Social Work, Guid., Lib.,
and 9:05 p.m. Math, Vocal, Boys PE, Girls PE, Science,
Speech.
School of Music Recital - Ralph Grand Rapids, Mich.-All fields.
Herbert, baritone, Eugene Bossart, Seattle, Wash.-All fields.
piano: Rackham Lecture Hall, 8:30 p.m. Honolulu, Hawaii-See Mon., Feb. 13.
TV Center Programs: On Sun., Feb. 5, WED., FEB. 15-
the following programs produced by the Warren, Mich. (Fitzgerald Schs.) -
TV Center will have their initial tele- Elem., Sp. Corr., Type A, Visit. Tch:,
cast on Detroit stations: Tch. Couns.,for Phys. Hdcp., Lib.. J.H.
8:30 a.m., WXYZ-TV, Channel 7 . - -Read., Sel., H.S.-Math, Bus./Bkkp.,
'Understanding Our World: Four Fam- Engl.
ilies Abroad." Four faculty men dis- Santa Clara, Calif.-Elem. K-6, J.H.-j
,uss the pros and cons of taking their Lang. Arts, Math, Science, Ind. Arts,
families abroad. H.S.-Engl., Ind. Arts, Math, Girls PE,
12 Noon, WWJ-TV, Channel 4 - SS, Spec. Ed.-Hard of Hearing.
'Campaign in the City." American pol- Sec. Wd.-ro Hes.
tics at the local level is examined in a Seattle Wash.-See Tues., Feb. 14.
documentary about Detroit City Coun- Medinah, Ill. (Lake Park H.S.)-All
cilman Mel Ravitz's bid for reelection. fields.
THURS., FEB. 16-
f* 1North Ridgeville, Ohio-Elem., Art,
General N ofises J.H.-French, Span., Art, Gen. Sci.,
H.S.-Math, German, Ind. Arts, Comm.,
Physical Education-Women Students: Sp. Ther., Guid., Sch. Psych.
Women students taking required phys- Redwood City, Calif.-Elem. only.
Ical education who were medically de-
ferred for the first half of this term Elgin, Ill.-Elem., K-6, Rem. Read.,
;hould report to Office 15, Barbour Gym- Art, Band, Vocal Supv., J.H.-Art, Gen.
nasium, to sign for the second half Bus., Engl., Engl./SS, Engl./Read., Home
of the term. Registration will be held Ec., SS, French, Ger., Span., Gen. Sci.,
from 8 a.m. to noon and 1 to 5 p.m., phys. Sci., Lib., Math, Strings, Vocal,
Monday through Thurs., Feb. 6 through Boys FE, Girls PE, H.S.-Art, Bus.,
6 Engl., French, Ger., Span., Guid., Ind.
Uppercass students who wish to elect Arts, Lib., Math, Hist., Girls PE, Biol.,
physical education classes may do so Physics., Econ., Speech, Spec. Ed. -
Th and Fria mornings only,

{
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kF
I
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w

IAL BULLETIN
EMH, Emot. Dist., Sp. Corr., Br. Dam- of Appointments, Education Division, Parks and Recreation, Skokie, Ill. -
aged, Social Work. 3200 SAB, 764-7459. Male & female for swimming inst., play-
Racine, Wis.-Elem., Lib., J.H. - ss, round leaders, bathhouse attendants,
Engl./SS, Math, Engl., Girls PE, Boys SUMMER PLACEMENT SERVICE: day camp counselors and pool life-
PE, French, Ger., Latin, Ind. Arts, Gen. 212 SAB- guards, must lixe in Skokie Park Dist.
Sci., Home Ec., Art, Vocal, Guid., H.S. INTERVIEWS: Children's Aid Society, New York -
-SS, Engl., French, Ger., Latin, Ind. FEB. 6- - Social work coed camp. Counselors and
Arts, Home Ec., Bus. Ed., Math, Girls Camp Birchtrail, Wis.-Private girl's unit leaders, program specialist in arts
PE, Guid., Art, :amp, interviewing for crafts, gymnas- and crafts, forestry-conservation, music
FRI., FEB. 17- tics, photography, nature, drama, dance n ae r wg.-
rand tripping. Also need female kitchen p.m.
Riverciew, Mich,(Riverview Comm. ! manager. ACA member camp.
Schs., Wyandotte, Mich.)-Elem., K-6, Green Lane, Pa.-Coed. Cabin coun- Further information and details at
H.S.-Bus., Eng., Home Ec., French, seenrs andi.-ed maidcoulsSummer Placement Service, 212 SAB,
SChoir/Glee Club, Dist. Ed., J.H. -- cepted Lower Level.
Math, Spec. Ed.-Type A. FEB. 7-
Pontiac, Mich. - Elem., Guid., Inst. Green Lane, Pa.-See Feb. 6 listing.
Music, PE, Read., J.H.-Engl., Math, Clarkston, Mich.-Coed. Riding, swim-
Vocal, Ind. Arts, Gen. Sol., Art. French, ming, nature, camp craft and counsel-
Read., Bus., Guid., H.S.-Engl., Math, ors, male & female.
Bus., Guid., Visit. Tch., Psych, FEB. 9-
Bellevue, Wash.-All fields. Camp Arbutus, Mich.-Girls. Water-
Torrance, Calif.--Elem., K-6, Sec.- 'front, landsports and crafts.
Ind. Arts, Spec. Ed.-Ment. Retard., Ed. National Y.W.C.A. Recruiter - Here
Hdcp. Feb. 10 in the afternoon.
Summer Post Office Jobs-Deadline
Make appointments now, for applications for test is this Thurs.,
For additional information and ap- Feb. 9. Get Form 5000AB at Summer
pointments contact Miss Collins, Bureau Placement Service.
AM M -EEM M=A-

A

SUNDAY, February 5

10:30 A.M.
7:00 P.M.

STRONG AND WEAK RESPONSES
Calvin Malefyt, Ph D
FACT AND FAITH
Prfe-Snr (,Prn e Menc n

on *nurs. au r.1- 1o- ,,
Feb. 23 and 24.
Science Research Club Meeting: 'Min-
lcry in Insects," Henry K. Townes, re-
search associate. School of Natural Re-
sources. Refreshments. "Recent Devel-
opments in Holography," Emmet Neith
Institute of Science and Technology.
Annual dues accepted after 7:15 p.m.
($2), Tues., Feb. 7, 7:30 p.m., Rack-
ham Amphitheatre.
Placement j
EDUCATION DIVISION:
The following schools will interview
at the Bureau during the week of Feb.
13:
MON., FEB. 13-
Honolulu, Hawai-Elem. K-6, Sec.-
Lang. Arts, SS, Math, Phys. Sci., Biol.,
Bus., Girls PE, French, Ger./Russian,
Span,, Ind. Arts, Art, Home Ec., Choral,
Band, Lib., Couns., Psych., Exam., Spec.
Ed.-EMR, TMR, Emot. Dist., Sp./Hear.,
Ortho., Rem. Read.
Ecorse, Mich.-Elem., Sec.-Engl/Jour-
nalism, Home Ec., Span./Latin, Elec.,
Sci./Photo., Bus. Ed.-Dept. Head.
Bellflower, Calif.-Elem. K-6, J.H.-
Engl., SS, Sci,, Math, For. Lang., Girls
PE, Ind. Arts, Home Ec., Fine Arts,
H.S.-Engl., Journ., Math, Sci., Bus.,
Fine Arts, Ind. Arts, For. Lang., Home
Ec., Girls PE, Sp. Ther., Ment. Retard.,
Lib.
Fremont, Calif.-All fields except Boys
PE, SS, Music & Art (will interview
at the Michigan Union on Sat. and
Sun., Feb. 11 & 12. Call the Bureau
for an appointment).
San Dimas, Calif. (Bonita Sch. Dist.)
-All fields except Boys PE & SS.
TUES., FEB. 14-
Bloomfield Hills, Mich.-Elem., Sec.-
Engl., Sci., Hist., French, Span., Latin,
German, Inst. Music, Vocal, PE, Ind.
Arts, Art, Bus., Couns., Lib., Social
Work, Psych., Spec. Ed., Deaf.
Westport, Conn.-All fields.

Near East Studies, U-M
UNIVERSITY REFORMED CHURCH
WHO PRINTS E. Huron across from Rackham
THE G RGOY E. Achurch providing counseling and
THE GA RGOYLEd? irection for families and students.
ORGET IT! We're not going to wwm'"" m " -" ""in mm ""mm mmi"""""""" mw""""""""
tell you. I mean we'd like to and u
everything, but we just can't. Yes- u
erday morning we received this / UPIZZAuI
frantic call from our printer.t * T IH O M PSr N ' PIZZA
seems that they were rathe, well
(their exact word for it was dis- 761 -0001
turbed) "grossed out" by our up- *
coming women's magazine parody, ,
KOZMOPOLITAN. This COUPON Good Toward
"You see Mr. Bohn," he said,
"oh1 we do*a lot of printing for5 c F
church groups, and well, oh w , 50c O F
hought it was rather funny and I1
everything, and we'll print it for 1 ON A LARGE ONE-ITEM PIZZA
you this time, but well, PLEASE
DON'T TELL ANYONE WE DID y (one coupon per customer)
IT I
IT.' s
OK, We know how to keep a GOOD ONLY Monday thru Thursday, u
secret.
FEB. 8th-KOZMOPOLITAN- ' Feb. 6, 7, 8 & 9
THE LADIES' MAGAZINE THAT *
GROSSED OUT OUR PRINTER (for pickup and delivery only) I
- I
_____________________=== === == === = I= I

t
w.

AGRALDUATE5
The
UNIVERSITY
OF
ROCHESTER
ROCHESTER, NEW YORK
We will be interviewing at
the University of Michigan
on February 16 for a varie-
ty of non-teaching posi
Lions. Among the fine ben-
efits is a liberal tuition re-
duction plan which enables
full-tue employees to con-
tinue their education. For
further details contact..
PLACEMENT OFFICE
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
STUDENT PUBLICATIONS BLDG.

CHRISTIAN MARRIAGE SERIES
at the
GABRIEL RICHARD CENTER
February 5, 1967 through February 26, 1967
Sunday, February 5, 8:00 P.M.
"THE CHRISTIAN ENCOUNTER IN MARRIAGE"
Rev. John Kirvan,C.S.P.
Chaplain, Wayne State University Newman Apostolate
Wednesday, February 8, 8:00 P.M.
"CHRISTIAN COURTSHIP AND PREPARATION
FOR MARRIAGE"
Msgr. John F. Bradley
Sunday, February 12, 8:00 P.M.
"THE PHYSICAL AND MEDICAL ASPECTS OF MARRIAGE"
Dr. Gena Rose Pahucki
Dr. Mikio Hiraga
Wednesday, February 15, 8:00 P.M.
"RESPONSIBLE PARENTHOOD AND BIRTH CONTROL"
Rev. Lawrence Bender,'S.S.
Prof. of Moral Theology, St. John's Seminary
Sunday, February 19, 8:00 P.M.
"THE PSYCHOLOGICAL ADJUSTMENTS IN MARRIAGE"
Prof. Robert 0. Blood
Chairman, Sociology Department, University of Michigan
Wednesday, February 22, 8:00 P.M.
"25 YEARS OF MARRIAGE"
Prof. and Mrs. Maurice Sinnott
Sunday, February 26, 8:60 P.M.
"THE SUCCESSFUL ECUMENICAL MARRIAGE"
Msgr. John F. Bradley
All Classes are held in the Gabriel Richard Center,
331 Thompson
READ AND USE DAILY (LASSIFIED ADS

4

I

1

F1

I

Tuesday ... 4:15 P.M.-Aud "A" Angell Hall
"The Religious Question in the Israeli Community"

IcH1GA

k I

an anecdotal,
pictorial history
of the University
the hitorv with

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 5-7:00 P.M.
concludes a series on
MEDICINE AND ETHICS

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®,

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