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February 05, 1967 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-02-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 1967

IrUE MICHIGAN DAILY

pAnp. C

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 5,1967 "TIlE MiChIGAN DAILY 1~ A f ~' ~'t~e~'~i

VAUL ZJLVLIN

i

Late
By HOWARD KOHN
Willy Edwards, a cool head with
a hot hand for rebounds, added
fuel to the fire in Michigan's 86-74
scorching of Purdue yesterday.
Streamlined Edwards snaked
into position for, eight jumping-
jack rebounds and spit in six
points in the last 10 minutes as
the Wolverines struck for a come-
from-behind victory.
Shut down in the first half by
Purdue's assembly-line jump shots,
37-30, Michigan opened shop in
the second half with 13 points in
three and a half minutes. Dennis
Bankey's three consecutive hard-
rimmed jumpers bounced the
Maize and Blue into the lead,
X42.

Cager

Spurt

Blisters

Purdue,

86-74

For six and a half minutes, the
Wolverines held the lead in limbo.
Then forward Dave McClellan,
playing on a tightly-taped tender
ankle, limped off with a charley
horse. Enter Willy.
"McClellan's injury wasn't ser-
ious. He could have gone back in
but Willy was doing really well,"
explained Michigan coach Dave
Strack.
Edwards usually presents the
picture of a high school great be-
ing torn up inside because he's
sitting on the bench in college.
But-to the surprise of a med-
iocre crowd of 3200 who came ex-
pecting a mediocre game - Ed-
wards tore up Purdue instead. Go-

ing into the contest he had only1
seven rebounds on the season. But:
he shocked Bill Fleming and BigI
Ten television, George King and
h i s short - shift Boilermakers,
Strack and his hit-and-run Wol- 1
verines-and himself.l
Amen!!
He was all handshakes and hal-<
lalejahs afterwards. There was
only one drawback. Willy found1
out that excitement riles the in-
sides more than frustration as he1
picked at the usual post-game1
meal in the Union.4
In a near paradox, the same
reason that gave Edwards his
chance to play almost cost the
Wolverines the game.
Starters Jim Pitts and Bob Sul-
livan sat out the game because of
"disciplinary" suspensions imposed{
by Strack. Without them, the1
Wolverines lacked the coordina-
tion needed to control the pace in
the first half.
"We looked tired and leadfoot-
ed," admitted Strack.
Vice Versa1
"Our pre-game plan was to play
a deliberate game and wait for
their, mistakes. It worked-but in
reverse. So in the second half, we
threw out that idea and picked up
the tempo.
"There's a strange mental-phy-
sical combination to basketball.
When you run fast and shoot
more, you don't think about being
tired," he explicated.
After rolling in the Big Ten
cellar for most of the season, the
Wolverines (2-4) are now a full
game in front of last-place Min-
nesota (1-5) and only a half-
game behind Purdue (2-3).
"We did a complete turnaround.
Everyone played a good second
half after playing a collectively
bad first half. Fortunately, they
don't count first half scores,"
toasted Strack.
High-Low
Michigan's second half total of
56 points was its highest for a
half this year. Its 30 points in the
first half equalled the lowest first
half in years.
Craig Dill, who was four inches

taller than anyone else on thea
floor, flipped in 15 of his team- t
leading 24 points in the final 20
minutes.t
With 8:55 left in the game andt
Michigan clinging to a 56-55 lead,s
Dill broke loose underneath for
the first "stuff" of his collegec
career.r
To set up the play, Edwardse
tipped a rebound to Dennis Ste-r
wart who dribbled the length oft
the court before handing it to Dillr
underneath. Herman Gilliam foul-
ed Dill on the play and the 6'10"
center converted the three-pointer.e
Impromptu Pattern
A minute later, in one of the:
m o s t remarkable combination
shots of the afternoon, Ken'
Maxey grabbed the ball in a back-'
court scuffle, lost it to Dill who
leaned over backwards to roll it
to Bankey. Caught unaware,
Bankey recovered in time to push
in a lay-up and give Michigan a
62-55 edge.
Bankey, hitting for one of his
top scoring performances of the
season with 15. was also fouledI

and also dropped in the free
throw.
Edwards and Maxey's high-
kicking jumpers in the next min-
ute put the Wolverines out of
sight.
Even Gilliam's popping from the
outside couldn't keep the Boiler-
makers within range. Gilliam,
eventually surrendered, a f t e r
notching 29 points and 14 re-
bounds, and the Wolverine posse
rounded up the stragglers.
King, head coach at Purdue, em-
phasized that the Boilermakers
couldn't outrun the Wolverines.

like Michigan, with its height ad-
vantage, we must run more effec-
tively than the other team. We
didn't."
King specifically lamented Pur-
due's penchant at intercepting the
ball for a breakaway and then
neglecting to dunk in the lay-up.'
"It was awful," he moaned.
"With those mistakes added to
Michigan's board control, we not,
only couldn't dictate the pace ...
we couldn't even keep up with it."
In the second half, Michigan
outrebounded Purdue, 35-19.

tired in the first half, we'd be
dead in the second," laughed
Strack. "But we started picking
the balls right out of the air."
Stewart and Dill were nigh for
the Blue with 12 each, followed
by McClellan and Maxey with 10.
During both the vaudeville acts
of the first half and the acrobatics
of the second, however, Bankey
was the master juggler. "He han-
dled the ball very well. He's usual-
ly one of our best outside shots,
but today he was driving the base-
line and putting in the inside
shots," praised Strack.
Bankery ripped through seven
out of 11 attempts from the floor I
for an eye-catching 63.6 per cent,
compared to Michigan's lukewarm

percentage of 42.0 The Wolverines,
after hitting a freezing 32.8 before
halftime, turned on for a cool 50.0
after.
Downhill
Purdue dipped from 45.8 to 35.1
in the second.
Strack indicated that Pitts, Sul-
livcan and substitute Scott Mont-
ross will probably be reinstated
this week. "I expect them to get
back into the good graces of their
teammates," he said.
"However, if they had played
today, Willy would never have
gotten his chance . . . I keep com-
ing back to Willy, and the guys
will probably kid the hell out of
him, but he was good out there,"
he smiled.

"For us to stay even with a club "They figured that if we were
Cazzie Would Be Proud

Stewart
McClellan
Dill
Bankey
Maxey
Maundrell
Edwards
Deaser
Totals

MICHIGAN
G F R
9-20 3-6 12
4-9 4-4 10
10-23 4-5 12

7-11
1-10
0-3
3-5
0-0

1-2
4-5
0-0
0-0
2-2

4
10
0
0

P T
3 21
3 12
1 24
3 15
5 6
0 0
0 6
0 2
15 86

PURDUE
G F R P'T
Blalock 3-15 1-3 6 3 7
Gilliam 8-16 4-5 14 4 20
Suerth 0-3 0-0 1 1 0
Ebershoff 3-11 4-5 2 3 10
Keller 5-13 1-1 6 0 11
Reasoner 5-6 1-2 4 2 11
Brady 5-8 0-0 2 1 10
Reynolds 2-4 1-1 3 3 5
Totals 36-71 12-17 51 17 74
MICHIGAN 30 56-86
PURDUE 37 37-74

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-Daily-Thomas R. Copi
MICHIGAN SOPHOMORE DAVE McCLELLAN pulls down a
rebound In yesterday's 86-74 victory over Purdue. McClellan,
starting his second game this year, ended up with 12 points and!
10 rebounds. Purdue's Herman Gilliam (30) looks on. ffi

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BIG TEN ROUNDUP:
Illini Snap Cats' Win Streak

By The Associated Press
CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - Northwest-
ern's perfect Big Ten basketball
record was snapped at four
straight by scrappy Illinois, 93-83,
despite serious injury to Illini vet-
eran Dean Flessner yesterday af-
temnoon.
Northwestern, falling well be-
hind its 96.4-point average, led
only oxrze in the entire game, at
30-29 and lagged by as many as
11 points in the second half al-
though the Wildcats spurted to
trail only 81-79 with 3:10 left.
It was the third Big Ten win
against two setbacks for Illinois
which avenged a 104-96 loss at
Northwestern on Jan. '10.
Sophomore Dave Scholtz, who
did not commit a foul in the
rough game, and Captain Jim
Dawson paced the Illini with 26
points each.
Jim Burns was the game's top
scorer with 29.

MADISON, Wis.-Ron Sepic re-
covered from a dazing head injury
to lead Ohio State to a 90-84 Big
Ten basketball victory over Wis-
consin in overtime yesterday after
the Buckeyes had wasted a 17-
point lead.
Sepic cracked a 78-78 tie with
two long jump shots early in the
extra session, triggering a decisive
seven-point spurt. He finished with
26 points, sinking 12 of 16 shots
from the floor.
* * *
MINNEAPOLIS - Indiana
weathered a 35-point outburst by
Minnesota's Tom Kondla and a
furious Gopher rally in the clos-
ing minutes to 'claim an 82-81 Big
Ten basketball victory last night.
Kondla fouled out with a little
over three minutes to play and
Indiana leading 76-71.
Bill DeHeer had 17 points while
Butch Joyner, Jack Johnson and

Erv Inninger each added 16 in In-
diana's balanced attack. Behind
Kondla, whose 19 points sparked
Minnesota to a 42-38 halftime
lead, Paul Presthus got 12 and
Ray Stephens 11.

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11

Big Ten Standings

1

Northwestern
Michigan State
Indiana
Illinois
Ohio State
Iowa
Wisconsin
Purdue
MICHIGAN
Minnesota

W L Pct.
4 1 .800
3 1 .750
3 1 .750
3 2 .600
3 3 .500
2 2 .500
2 3 .400
2 3 .400
2 4 .333,
1 5 .16'7

Tomorrow's Games
No. Michigan at Ohio State
Illinois at Iowa
Michigan State at Indiana
Tuesday's Game
Hawaii at Purdue

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