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January 07, 1967 - Image 3

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The Michigan Daily, 1967-01-07

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SATURDAY, JANUARY 7: 1567

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE

SATURDAY, JANUARY 7,1967 THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE THREE

Vague

Hints

From

Hanoi
Talks

Mao Confesses Errors Made

In Promotions of Party Aides

Bolster

Hopes

for

TOKYO ()-A North Vietnam-
ese government statement yester-
day described Hanoi's hardline
demands as a "basis of ways to
settle Vietnam problems." The
Communists' attitude to w a r d
peace talks without conditions
was left in doubt.
Vague hints from the Commu-
nist capital have quickened in-
terest around the world in the
possibility of a Hanoi, contact
with Washington. The United
States waited for clarification
of North Vietnamese statements,
expressing hope for something
positive.
Thus far, from the U.S. admin-

istration's viewpoint, nothing con-
crete has been forthcoming from'
Hanoi to indicate whether an
American decision to halt the
bombing of North Vietnam would
lead to a reciprocal gesture from
that country's Communist regime.
The latest development in what
appeared to be a guarded sound-
ing by Hanoi was the broadcast
by the Communists' official news
agency, the Vietnam News Agency
of an "authorized" statement de-
scribing Hanoi's four-point stand
on Vietnam as a basis for settle-
ment.
The statement was preceded by
complaints that some newspapers

and broadcasts in "capitalist na-
tions" had distorted remarks
made Wednesday by Premier
Pham Van Dong .in an interview
with a New York Times cor-
respondent in Hanoi.
The broadcast gave no instance
of distortion but said: "On this
matter, the VNA has been author-
ized to make the following state-
ment: The original text of what
Premier Pham Van Dong told
Mr. Harrison Salisbury was: 'The
position of the four points of the
Democratic Republic of Vietnam
is a basis of ways to settle Viet-
nam problems'."
Salisbury, an assistant man-

aging editor of the Times, had'
quoted the premier as saying the
four points were no conditions for
talks but rather a basis for settle-
ment. This had aroused specula-
tion abroad that North Vietnam
had retreated in some degree
from the all-or-nothing stand of
the four points, which have been
an obstacle to negotiations.
The four points are:
! Recognition of the independ-
ence, sovereignty and unity of
Vietnam and withdrawal of all
U.S. forces and installations pend-
ing reunification of the country;
" Respect for the 1954 Geneva
agreements under which the

country was divided;
* Settlement of Vietnam's fu-
ture by the Vietnamese without
foreign interference and "in ac-
cordance with the program" of
the National Liberation Front, the
Communist Viet Cong's political
arm, and
*Peaceful reunification with-
out foreign interference.
After Dong's statement was
published, Washington restated its
position: it was prepared to talk
without preconditions and to or-
der cessation of bombing the mo-
ment Hanoi gave assurances pub-
licly or secretly that there would;
be a corresponding North Viet-
namese move to scale down
hostilities.
In Vatican City, Pope Paul VI
contributed to the wave of new
speculation about possible peace
moves by appealing to Red China
to a "talk peace." He was speak-
ing of religious peace, but some
Vatican sources interpreted this
as meaning virtually an offer of
papal mediation in Vietnam,
since if Peking would open the!
door to discussion on religious!
matters the way would be clear
to talk about Vietnam, too,

TOKYO ()-Mao Tse-tung has
admitted he was partly to blame
for elevating his current anta-
gonists to high party positions,
according to wall posters appear-
ing in Peking yesterday.
If true, this is a remarkable
admission from a man once con-
sidered infallible and all-power-I
ful in Red China. It comes on
the heels of reports this week
that he lost two fights in the
Central Committee.
The newspaper Yomiuris Peking
correspondent . said the party
chairman made his statement at
a recent party meeting to ex-
plain the reason why he had to
launch the "great proletarian cul-
tural revolution," as the current
purge is called..
The development caine amid in-:
dications that the purge will be
intensified.
Japanese correspondents in Pe-
king said bloody fighting between
Mao's teen-age militants, the Red
Guards, and workers has in-
creased since the new year and,
violence may grow in the power:l
struggle between Mao and his
foes. They saw this as inevitable
because most ranking party of-
ficials and workers support Mao's
chief enemies, President Liu
Shao-chi and Teng Hsiao-ping,
Central Committee secretary gen
eral.
Yomiuri's report said Mao ad-
mited erring when he devided the
standing committee of the Polit-
buro into a front-line group and

second-line group. Liu and Teng'
were in the first group.
Mao was quoted as saying he
hao done this "in order to retire
to the second group and entrust
the future of the party and the
nation to the front-liners." When
this took place was not explained.
Many front-liners "diverted to
decentralism and formed many
independent kingdoms," Mao con-
tinued. He criticized Liu and Teng
as following the "reactionary
bourgeois line."
"However," he added, "it was
not right to shift all the blame
to only front-line group members.
I and other party executives were
responsible for this situation.,
"Realizing the error," the wall
posters said, "Mao tried to rectify
the situation by taking up the
problem at the Central Commit-
tee meeting of the party in Sep-
tember and October 1965."
But Mao was reported helpless

because "the capital had already
been so firmly fortified- by Peng
Chen and his followers that there
was no room to drive a pin into
it," the chairman said. Peng
Chen, Peking's former mayor and
Politburo member, has been
purged.
"Therefore," *Mao said, "I had
no choice but to leave Peking and
go to Shanghai in order to launch
an attack against the antiparty
group in the capital."
This conforms to Red Guard
wall posters appearing Thursday
saying Mao was balked by the
Central Committee from putting
the purge into operation and went
to Shanghai in November of 1965.
He remained there until last July.
On Tuesday, posters said Mao
against his will relinquished the
presidency of China to Liu at a
Central Committee meeting in
1958.

Prospects of Chinese Domination
Influence North Vietnamese Policy

THIS is musket
"High Spirits and Energy Can Be
Expected By Any University Production,
But As Well You Gave Us Sincerity,
Dedication, and Joy... And All Coupled
With That Very Difficult Thing:
Discipline and an Extremely High Level
Of Accomplishment."
-Ellis Raab
Director of the
A.P.A. About Musket!

AP News Analysis
By WILLIAM L. RYAN
North Vietnam has good reason
to weigh seriously the advisability
of negotiation with the United
States on the Vietnam war.
There is a hint that it is prob-
ing and jockeying for position.
Its latest announcement was so
brief as to suggest the Commu-
nist regime in Hanoi was involved
in debate on the question.
Hanoi has one outstanding rea-
son to be interested now in talk-
ing.
Peking has violently opposed
even the idea of talks without
total U.S. surrender as a precon-
dition. Hanoi sees-and undoubt-
edly dislikes-the prospect' of
being overhelped by China. China,
a traditional enemy, could one
day smother the Vietnamese with
"volunteers," and military tech-
nicians.
But Peking's leaders, preoccu-
pied with a politcal convulsion at
home, seem in a poor position to
intervene now.
A key to the door to negotia-
tions may lie in the proposal by
U.N. Secretary-General U Thant
for an end to U.S. bombing. In-
formed observers in Moscow, for
example, say they are convinced

that if the United States accepted
the U.N. official's proposal, Hanoi
would be willing to talk about a
cease-fire. This also would permit
Moscow to bring its influence to
bear in seeking an end to the
conflict.
There is a credibility gap in
this, however, since Moscow of-
fically professes to .doubt that
the Unted States really wants to
negotiate.
A word from Hanoi could break
the ice jam.
North Vietnam appeared yester-
day to hedge a bit from the state-
ment of its premier, Pham Van
Dong, as reported two days ear-
lier. A New York Times interview
published Wednesday quoted the
premier as saying the north's
four-point demands were not to
be considered conditions for talks,
but rather a "basis for settle-
r^- nt of the Vietnamese prob-
le a:"
Now comes an "authorized
statement" of the official Hanoi
news agency, transmitting a gov-
ernment announcement. This says
only that the points were a "basis
of ways to settle Vietnam pro-
blems."
On the surface this seems to
contradict what Dong said and

reasert the four points as the only
route to talks. It suggests the
Hanoi party and government felt
impelled to qualify Dong's re-
marks, but the fact that the state-
ment was issued at all hints at
some disagreement and a glimmer
of interest in negotiations.
The Communists insist on two
points: That the National Libera-
tion Front, the Viet Cong's polit-
ical wing, be regarded as the only
legitimate voice of the south; and
that any settlement be "in ac-

cordance with the progam"' of the
Front.'
This could mean long, tortuous
and acrimonious negotiation. But
it would give the north time to
sooth painful economic jolts from
U.S. boming and its own costly
involvement. Before long, the
north may desperately need out-
side help to continue active parti-
cipation in the war-and it does
not appear to welcome the notion
of help from China.

U.S. F4C
one North
destruction
cy-veiled

Phantom jets tumbled
Vietnamese MIG21 to
yesterday by a secre-
maneuver 30 -miles

E,, _.------_ _.__._.__-----_ _.. ___________..._

northwest of Hanoi and shot
down another .with a missile, Air
Force spokesmen announced.
That ran the record for the
week to nine MIG's against no
American losses, and for the war
to 36 to 10.

GEORGIA RACE:
Court Decision Clears Way
For Probable Maddox Victory

UAC MUSKET '67
t9ut
Our,
the new musical

" Block Sales
January 13
! Individual Sales
start
January 16
Lydia Mendelssohn
Box Office
All Seats $2.50
Performances:
Date:
Fri.-Sun., Jan. 27-29
Wed.-Sat., Feb. 1-4
Time:
Fri. & Sat. Nights
7:00 & 9:30
All Other Nights
8:30

TICKETS:

I I
IWorld News Roundup
By The Associated Press Powell that would be well short of
WASHINGTON-Efforts to dis- the punishment his severest critics
WASINGON-ffots o ds-want imposed on the Harlem
cipline Rep. Adam Clayton Powell Negro because of his troubles with
apparently were weakened Friday the law and his conduct of cam-
by the House speaker's opposition mittee business.
to drastic action and by a major * bis
House Democratic group's adop- LONDON - Prime Minister
tion of a neutral stand. Harold Wilson Friday night an-
Authoritative sources confirmed nounded a number of changes in
that in a two-hour session Thurs- his government, mainly designed
day with some of Powell's critics to strengthen the Foreign Office
Speaker John W. McCormack op- and streamline the military estab-
posed depriving the New York lishment. Douglas Houghton, min-
Democrat of either 'his House seat ister without portfolio in charge of
or his chairmanship of the Edu- long-term social welfare planning,
cation and Labor Committee. and seven other ministers resigned
The venerable Massachusetts to make room for younger men
leader is understood to be seeking from the Labor party's ranks in
gome compromise action against Parliament.

ATLANTA, Ga. (P)-Georgia's
Supreme Court ruled 5 to 2 yes-
terday that the legislature has
the power and right 'to choose the
next governor. This cleared the
way for the probable election of
Democrat Lester G. Maddox who
ran second in unofficial returns.
Maddox, 51, widely known for
his segregationist views, is favored
over Republican Howard "Bo"
Callaway in the heavily Dem-
ocratic General Assembly which
convenes Monday.
The legislature will take up the
governor's election Tuesday.
"The decision is in good hands
and I am confident of victory,"
said Maddox, who carried 130 of
the 159 counties in the Nov. 8 gen-

eral election but trailed in pop-
ular votes.,
The contest, which was Geor-I
gia's first two-party election for
governor in a century, was thrown
into a confusing deadlock when1
neither nominee got a majority
becaus of write?ins for Ellis G.
Arnall, a former governor, and a
moderate on civil rights.
Upholds Constitution
The state tribunal upheld a
143-year-old provision of the
Georgia constitution which says
the legislature shall elect. a gov-
ernor from the two top candidates
if no person receives a popular
majority.

Affirming a lower court, the
majority decision also backed up
a Dec. 12 ruling by the U.S. Su-
preme Court which said the legis-
lature should elect the governor.
Presiding Justice Bond Almand
wrote for the Georgia tribunal
majority: "In our opinion, it is
plain and certain that where the
canvassed returns show no person
received a majority of the votes
cast in the general election on the
date appointed by the constitu-
tion, Article V reserves to the
General Assembly the power and
right by the vote of a majority
of the members present . . . to.
elect a governor from the two
persons having the highest num-
ber of votes."

LYDIA MENDELSSOHN
JAN. 27-29, FEB. 1-4

NOW SHOWING

I

CINEMA I
Presents
MUTINY
ON THE
BOUNTY
('Scope and Color)
MARLON BRANDO

"SUPERIOR!WONDERFUL PELL-MELL
ENJOYMENT, IMMENSELY ORIGINAL!
THE WAY IT IS WITH THIS NEW BREED
OF YOUNG PEOPLE RACING CRAZILY
THROUGH A CHANGING WORLD:'
Bosley Crowther. NX Times

TREVOR HOWARD

HUGH GRIFFITH

COLUMBIA PICTURES e e
JAMES MASON- ALAN BATES-LYNN REDGRAVEE
dWm son CHARLOTTE RAMPLING satAWEFnmmAsEadt"MM u erlae4WRAFORSsI
.R., OBERT A.GOLOSTONaiOTTO PLASCHKES rucisd SILVIO NARIZZANO A'twwCA ESn*c
7, 9, 11-Friday
5, 7, 9, 11-Saturday
5, 7, 9-Sunday

Brando at his best (or worst,
depending on your point of view). Probably
the most beautiful sea spectacle ever

11

I

I

'* I

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