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January 07, 1967 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1967-01-07

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY, JANUARY 7, 1967

PAETOTEMCIGNDIYSTRAY AUR ,16

Nurses Diversify

A Raisin in the Sun'

- Vivid Portrayal

In Flexible Program Of Frustration in Negro Family Affairs

By CATHY PERMUT
Try catching one of those blue-
striped coeds if you can, as she
hurries acros the Fishbowl pursu-
ing a few electives in her tight
four-year-three-summer schedule
toward a nursing career.
She's part of a distinguished
program with a different type of
emphasis. Graduates leave the
School of Nursing with a BS which
says they know the theory behind
the duties they perform and are
qualified to do administrative
work. In this, the School's policy
is quite, in keping with the Uni-
versity tradition, although it dif-
fers considerably in length and
depth from a program for Prac-
tical Nurses.
But these blue-swathed Florence
Nightingales may also leave Ann
Arbor as Registered Nurses whose
Job includes observation, care and
counel' of the ill and prevention
of illness: Second-, third-, and
fourth-year student nurses spend
three to four months in each of
six medical divisions, actually
practicing their profession at var-
ious city hospitals in obstetrics,
pediatrics, psychiatry, junior and
senior surgery,. and public health.
Few undergraduates besides stu-
dent teachers have any outside ex-
perience in the world they are Pre-
paring to enter.
As the nurses go through the:;
rotational periods they attend lec-'
tures ranging from microbiology
to pharmacology, and practice ses-
sions in. nursing fundamentals.
And their first-year requirements
round out this education with
courses in the humanities and so-
cial sciences. In addition to its
750 undergraduates, the School
offers graduate nursing degrees in
Medical-Surgical and Psychiatric
Nursing.
The end of Nursing's Diamond

Jubilee Celebration last summer
saw the beginning in the Nursing
School of steering committees.
Student nurses, feeling that'
they are just like other students,
formed a 12-woman committee to
advise the Nursing Student Coun-
cil. They are attempting to help'
nurses understand their roles and
to consider their complaints and
concerns.'
The Steering Committee has
arranged informal coffee-hour and
discussions with Dean Rhoda
Russell. Their main plans involve
evaluation of the rotational period
and an LSA academic card file to
keep nurses up-to-date on var-
ious elective courses and instruc-
tors.
In keeping with their distin-
guished program at the University
and their distinctive service to the.
community, one local project of
the Washtenaw Student Nurses
Association is regular baby-sitting
for retarded children in the
county. One volunteer feels their
contribution is the help and con-
fidence nursing sitters gave to
parents with such problems. Which
is just one more reason to follow
that girl in blue.

tI

By ANNE RICHMOND
Editor of Generation
Many of us are familiar with
Lorraine Hansberry's "A Raisin
In the Sun." Set on Chicago's
south side, the story concerns a
Negro family that has, as one of
its members says, "acute ghetto-
itis." The play is about the frus-
trations of the American Negro,
but it is not a polemic. It is about
the tenderness and the bitterness
that exists between people who
love each other, but it is not senti-
mental. In the hands of the Ann
Arbor Civic Theatre, presented in
Lydia Mendelssohn this weekend,
it is simple and warm and quite
wonderful.
The key to the success of this
production is realism.. From the
moment the curtain rises on the
set, we are given a direct and un-
clouded view into the life of the
Younger family. The director,
Priscilla Travis, inserts little real-
istic details; a window is opened,
light floods the room; a character
munches on toast. Often these
touches slow the pace; the pauses
they create are long and the tem-
po seems to lag.

The acting itself is sincere and
honest, and, aside from a great
deal of opening night jitters, quite
competent. Singer Buchanan un-
doubtedly heads the cast as ;the
explosive and restless brother. His
voice and his physical character-
ization are strong and assured and
his moments of humor are as ef-
fective as his moments of fury.
Melinda Willis, though not as
competent technically, plays a
gentle and warm wife. Unfortu-
nately, her chronic tiredness some-
times, in Miss Willis's interpreta-
tion, turns into neuroticism and
excessive emphasis on despair
blurs for us her unflagging devo-
tion to the family.
Lois Owens, as the headstrong
sister, Beneatha, has created a

humorous and relaxed character
that pleases the audience greatly.
Julia Moore, as the dignified and
grand Mama, is strong though
technically imperfect. Her mo-
ments of intensity, when over-
acting could have been dangerous,
are quiet and underplayed, and we
see ' strong sorrow when she in-
vokes her husband, "Oh, Big
Walter, is this the harvest of our
days?"
Among the minor characters,
Joseph Medrano as the white man
designated to keep the Younger
family out of his neighborhood,
deserves special mention. He re-
mains at a sufficient distance
from his character to be able to
comment satirically on it, and the
audience responds to his humor.

In truth, the racial issue is not
the theme of "A Raisin In the
Sun." The play derives its pop-
ularity from its presentation of a
family that has it problems as well
as its joys and whose members
love and respect each other
throughout. This is what is fine
about the Civic Theatre's produc-
tion, that it is simple and funda-
mental, emphasizing people, not
issues. No, it is not professional.
But it is an evening of sincere and
honest community theatre.

Tonight is SOLD OUT, but
TOMORROW NIGHT
you and your date can see
Ann Arbor Civic Theatre's
A RAISIN IN THE SUN
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre, 7:00 p.m.
$1.50 and $1.75
Box office (668-6300) open today 10 a.m to 8 p.m.,

4'

tomorrow noon to 7 p.m.

r

-I

U

THIS ONE IS
TRULY DIFFERENT!

presents a FREE
JAZZ CONCERT
Sunday, Jan. 8 ... 8 P. M.
North Campus Commons
Featuring U of M Jazz Quartet

There isoa wide selection of films today, playing in theatres for
the pleasure of the selective movie-goer. They cover the spectrum
from' suspense to drama to comedy. But there is a unique motion
picture that is different from all of these. It may be said that it
is the only film of its kind. It is called "Mademoiselle." Certainly
many films, have probed the mysterious psyche of woman, but
this courageous picture reveals a shockingly different aspect of
the female. Jean Genet's story shows what can happen to a"
woman who is loveless. As the film plunges into the roots of her
evil, it is unflinching and unspairing, with a realism no other
motion picture has ever attempted. Jeanne Moreau magnifi-
cently portrays this helpless woman who unleashes her frustra-
tions in a turbulent night of live with an itinerant worker. Tony
Richardson's direction is hailed as better than his widely ac-
claimed "Tom Jones." See "Mademoiselle." You will never
forget it.

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4

Use.

l:

Daily

Classified
Ads,

TONY MCADSONS
rMAiJEMOISELE
JEANNE 44
MOREAU
" ADDED
SPORTS A GO GO
BUNGLED BUNGALOW

PRESENTATIONS

REMAINING PERFORMANCES

TONIGHT
and
TOMORROW
CHARLIE
CHAPLIN'S
THE
GOLD
RUSH
S:00 &9:05
Architecture Aud.
STILL ONLY 50c

SECOND SEMESTER

In Hitt Adtot-riu
Note: All programs begin at 8:30 P.M. unless otherwise indicated.
DETROIT SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA.........2:30, Sunday, January 8
ROYAL WINNIPEG BALLET . .......... . .....Saturday, February 4
MINNEAPOLIS SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA ... 2:30, Sunday, February 26
Stanislaw Skrowaczewski, Conductor
JOSE GRECO DANCE COMPANY .............. Wednesday, March .8
SHIRLEY VERRETT, Mezzo-soprano...............Monday, March 13
STOCKHOLM UNIVERSITY CHORUS . .. . Thursday, April 6
BOSTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA...... . Saturday, April 8
Erich Leinsdorf, Conductor
Tickets: $5.00--$4.50=' $4.00-$350-$2.50-$1.50

4

TODAY

DIAL
8-6416

i

Next!
Claude Giroux Presents . .

Grand Prize Winner '66
CANNES FILM FESTIVAL

STARTS FRIDAY !
DEAN MARTIN in
"MURDERERS ROW"

A MAN AND A WOMAN

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1'

Ill

She'S PIJBU.uNIT
That's Penelope-the slick stick-up chick
...and she's leading the merriest men on
the hottest chase from safe to sofa.

l.-

A special U of MASesquicentennial event
ARTUR RUBINSTEIN ........2:30, SUNDAY, MARCH 5
Tickets: $5.00-$4.50-$3.00--$2.50-$1.50
On sale beginning Monday, January 9

I

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CHAMBER MUSIC FESTIVAL
in Rackham Auditorium
BORODIN QUARTET (from Moscow).........8:30, Friday, February;
STOCKHOLM KYNDEL STRING QUARTET .. 8:30, Saturday, February
TRIO ITA LIANO d'ARCH I. .. .. ... .. .. .. . .2:30, Sunday, February
Series Tickets: $8.00-$6.00-$5.00. Single Concerts: $4.00-$3.00-$2.00
ANN ARBOR MAY FESTIVAL
APRIL 22,23,24,25,1967-5 Concerts
in Hill Auditorium
PHILADELPHIA ORCHESTRA AT ALL CONCERTS
SATURDAY, APRIL 22,8:30
EUGENE ORMANDY, Conductor. GALINA VISHNEVSKAYA,
Russian soprano. Arias to be announced. "London"
Symphony (Haydn) ; and Concerto for Orchestra (Bartok).
SUNDAY, APRIL 23, 2:30
THOR JOHNSON, Conductor. MSTISLAV ROSTROPOVICH,
Cellist, in Dvorak Concerto. Vivaldi "Magnificat"
with University Choral Union; VERONICA TYLER, Soprano,.and
MILDRED MILLER, Contralto. Also, Choral Union in world premiere
of "The Martyr's Elegy" (Finney), with WALDIE ANDERSON, Tenor,
SUNDAY, APRIL 23, 8:30

17
18
19

11

Phone 482-2056
EntAm, Oa CARPENTER ROACD
NOW SHOWING. OPEN 6:30 P.M.
-FREE HEATERS--
Shown at 7:05 & 11:50
on No GNE.
CAS.R 4
ALSO . .. ~

9

*
*
4

EUGENE ORMANDY, Conductor. VAN CLIBURN, Pianist.
in Brahms Concerto No. 2; "Haffner" Symphony (Mozart);
New England Triptych (Schumann) ; Suite No. 2 from
"Daphnis and Chloe" (Ravel).
MONDAY, APRIL 24,8:30
THOR JOHNSON, Conductor. Verdi "Monzoni" Requiem with
University Choral Union; GALINA VISHNEVSKAYA; MILDRED
MILLER; GIUSEPPI CAMPORA, Tenor; and EZIO FLAGELLO, Bass.
I +rtic~cn vaW.7 u3rT '2K O.±)d

peneope....the world's most
beautiful bank-robber

to-starring
q _. ....., .§ , 1 ...re.

in Ph namkidn'E9%;

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