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February 02, 1967 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-02-02

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 2: 1967

THE MICHIGAN DAILY TTTTIRSDAY. FERRTTARV ~ 1~SE~7

t V.iVi..Ai/AAi y.;'.. il..ALP&WVA141 (eI iJV4

STUDENT PARTICIPATION:
Role Undetermined as Student Boards Take Shape

(Continued from Page 1)
The problem with the advisory
boards as they are now, he said,
is that they are composed of in-.
dividual students with no constitu-
ency to report to and so are not
strictly speaking "representative."
What he would like to see, Leed
said, is "a more radical approach;

something substantial in terms of
student participation, not just in
certain? areas like student rules
and regulations, but student voice
in policy-making areas not .xclus-
ively their own."
Neill Hollenshead, '67, SGC
council member, envisions the
working relation between ,the two
systems as one in which the ad-

Academic Freedom Report
Causes Discontent at MSU

(Continued from Page 1)
Reinoehl said that though in
the original report the committee
had not considered representation
on ASMSU, the final edition of
the report was not due for ap-
proximatel two weeks. He said
that such critics of the report had
already attacked it without seeing
it in its entirety. He would not
commit himself to saying, how-
ever, that any major revisions had
been made before the report was
to be submitted to the Academic
Senate.
A consultant to the committee
has noted that the report could

be seen as "intentially vague" in
dealing with certain issues on cam-
pus. This ambiguity,,he said, leaves
open a. wide variety of interpreta-
tions by the Student-Faculty Jud-
iciary or allowing old policies to
be scrapped and new ones to be
formulated.
Reinoehl and other committee
members appeared optimistic over
the final passage of the report
and its final implementation. He
said, "This report represents a
significant step forward in student
academic rights and brings to bear
the entire judicial process in de-
termining and defending them."

visory boards will pass on com-
ments and ideas on the workings
of the boards to the presidential
commission for their use in analyz-
ing the advisory board concept.
Contact With Organizations
The presidential commission is
taking particular care to keep in
close contact with the student
body. The student members of the
commission have sent letters to
various student organizations, in-
cluding SGC, asking for, ideas on
the student role and suggestions
for the agenda.
The advisory boards are tied
formally to SGC in a series of
communication links which would
bring all information back to
SOC's Executive Council and all
but very privileged information to
all of SGC and then, presumably,
to the rest of the student body.
The advisory boards have been
designed as an extension of SGC
and if they operate successfully
could substantially increase con-
tact between students and admin-
Across
Camputs
THURSDAY, FEB. 2
7 and 9:05 p.m. - Cinema Guild
will present Georges Franju's "La
Tete Contre Les Murs" (Head
Against the Walls) in the Archi-
tecture Aud.
FRIDAY, FEB. 3
7 and 9:05 p.m.-Cinema Guild
will present George Franju's "La
Tete Contre Les Murs" (Head
Against the Walls) in the Archi-
tecture Aud.
7 and 9:05 p.m.-Cinema II will
present Richard Lester's "A Hard
Day's Night" in Aud. A.
SATURDAY, FEB. 4
7 and 9:05 p.m.--Cinema Guild
will present Akira Kurosawa's
"The Lower Depths"'in the Archi-
tecture Aud.
7 and 9:05 p.m.--Cinema II will
present Richard Lester's "A Hard
Day's Night" in Aud. A.
8:30 p.m.-The University Mus-
ical Society Choral Union Series
will present a dance concert by
the Royal Winnipeg Ballet in Hill
Aud.
SUNDAY, FEB. 5
7 and 9:05 p.m.-Cinema Guild
will present Akira Kurosawa's
"The Lower Depths" in the Archi-
tecture Aud.

istrators and the
available to students.

informationI

Any discussions on the part of
the decision-making commission
on the structure of student parti-
cipation will involve discussion of
SGC as it is presently constituted
and possible suggestion for change.
Such discussions might take into
account the ideas mentioned in
the Knauss Report on Student
Participation of restructuring a
student government which would
include graduate students..

Hollenshead said he sees SGC
now as in an "interim stage,"
awaiting modifications or perhaps
a whole new student government
structure.
For the moment however, every-
one seems to be watching and
waiting-the vice-president are
waiting for their advisory boards,
the student members of the Deci-
sion-Making Commission for in-
formation on the first official
meeting and SGC to see what hap-
pens to both of them, and to itself
once they start operating.

Have You
ACCELERATED
Lately .. .?
Sp~eed up your educa-
tional process by studying
this summer at the school
of your choice. We'd like
you to choose Marquette.
Write today for your
bulletin.
Office of Admissions
MARQUETTE
UNIVERSITY
Dept. DU 3
1131 W. Wisconsin Ave.
Milwaukee,__wis. 53233

TODAY, PROMPTLY

Two Original One-Acts
THE FOUNTAIN by Richard Reichman
THE APPLE JOKE by Fritz Lyon
(Students of Playwriting Class, English Department)
DEPARTMENT OF SPEECH
STUDENT LABORATORY THEATRE PROGRAM
ADMISSION FREE

Increased College Fees
$N. -6 - - - U

Grosse Pointe.High
Students Demonstrate
GROSSE POINTE W)-An angry pelled two years ago was arrested
Grosse Pointe High School student and charged with disorderly con-
leader labeled protesting fellow duct, malicious destruction of
students "a bunch of long-haired property and using profanity on
crums," as demonstrations con- a public street.
tinued there Tuesday. "There will be further suspen-
Rocky Withrow, 17, a senior sions if this kind of interference
three-letterman and student coun- continues," said Jerry Gerich, the
cil member, lashed out at the lead- school's principal. "We will not
ers of the demonstrations after tolerate this kind of behavior."
about half of a crowd of 300 pro- Michael James Morgan, 18, of
testors invaded a school, council Grosse Pointe Park, was released
nleeting after school Tuesday. under $120 bond, $40 for each of
Protest demonstrations started the three offenses charged against
last Thursday. The issue origin- him, after being arraigned Tues-
ally centered on the school's fail- day in Municipal Court.
ure to give a one-day semester
break, but demonstrators Tuesday
said they now represented a gen-
eral dissatisfaction with the ad-
ministration.
Besides invading the student OW
council meeting, demonstrators
hurled chunks of ice at school
buses and hung a figure in effigy
outside the school.
The Grosse Pointe High School
principal today threatened more
student suspensions in an effort
to curb the demonstrations.
Two students were suspended TON IGHT
for a week Tuesday and an 18- and
year-old youth who had been ex-
TOMO)R RCOW

UAC MUSKET '67
ut
@ur
the new musical

'Would you pass up
something you couldn't
help but enjoy?"
--Michigan Daily
about MUSKET '67
The Original Cast
Recording of
OUT OF OUR MINDS
is on sale at
Lydia Mendelssohn
Theatre during all
performances.
This exciting record
NOW ON SALE AT
DISCOUNT RECORDS
STORES.
State St.--S. University
Tickets available
for Thur. & Fri. only

4:10 PA

4

44

Iay .Lower I
(Continued from Page 1)
-Georgia's state-s u p p o r t e d
schools held fees' at the 1962 level.
until this academic year, when
there was an increase averaging
33 per cent. At Georgia Tech, res-
idents students now pay $315 a;
year, nonresidents $1,005.
"The increases were made be-
cause. it was necessary to get
operating funds," explained Dr.
Harry Downs, assistant vice chan-
cellor of the University System
of Georgia,
In Illinois, the proposed budget
for higher education. in 1967-'68
is $600 million, up 40 per cent
from the preceding biennium, and
some college administrations re-
gard tuition increases as inevitable.
The University of Illinois charges
resident students $270 a year,
nonresidents $870, compared with
$230 and $580 in 1961.
Nonresident students in Califor-
nia now- pay $980 a year plus a
$219 incidentals fee, compared
with $500 and $120 five years ago.
New York System
New York, where 24 undergrad-
uate schools had been tuition-free
to resident students, adopted a
uniform tuition schedule in 1963

1nrollments
which requires payment from al-
most all who attend state institu-
tions of higher learning.
Resident undergraduates pay
$400, nonresidents $600. Students
at graduate schools, both resident
and nonresident, pay $500. At
medical, dental, law and other
professional schools the charge is
$800 for residents, $1,000 for non-
residents.
However, New York also has
what it calls a "scholar incentive
program," applying only to resi-
dent students, which is based on
family net income. An undergrad-
uate student from a family with
taxable income of less than $1,800
pays nothing. If income is $1,800
to $7,500 the student pays $200
and the state reimburses the col-
lege for the other $200. If net in-
come is more than $7,500 the stu-
dent pays $300 and the state $100.
Increasing costs have hit pri-
vate schools just as hard as those
suported by the states, and tui-
tion charges have risen accord-
ingly.
In 1961-62 the tuition at Har-
vard was $1,520. It is $1,760 this
year and in September it goes up
to $2,000.

LYDIA MENDELSSOHN

FEB. 1-4

I

y1'I

Cinemase1
presents

1

"SUPERIOR OFF-BEAT, AND
ORIGINALIt-N.. TIMES
COURIA PICTURES
Na3S4m rm ve
JMeK M&SON 3L0N BPfS LyNR2IDve
SUGGESTED FOR MATURE AUDlENCES
Thursday 7 and 9
Ann Arbor, Michigan
210 S. Fifth Avenue
761-9700

I ~tRRVY
George Franju's
LA TETE
CONTRE
LES MURS
(HEAD AGAINST
THE WALLS)
1958. French,
subtitles.
One of the
greatest
achievements
of anarchist
cinema.
ARCH. AUDITORIUM
7 & 9:05 P.M.
STILL ONLY 50c=

14

II

11

1

I

Dial 8-6416

4 :f.1

Holding Again!
4th Week!
FILM/"-The New Yorker

GRAND PRIZE WINNER
1966 CANNES FILM
FESTIVAL

'A

r PRESENTS
MAN
-. F ANd A WOIAN

(C and NATIONALITY CLUBS
UNION-LEAGUE r
of the University of Michigan
Fri., Feb. 3 7:00 P.M.-12:30 A.M.
* Sat., Feb. 4 1:00P.M.-12:30 A.M.
* Michigan Union
General Admission 50c
* variety Show75c
U
Friday 8and 10
Saturday 7, 9, and11
[ Union Ballroom \

4

NOW !

a Program Information 2-6264 -
.7:15-9:25

802 MONROE
Friday, Feb. 3-Noon Lunch 25c
LUNCHEON-DISCUSSION
(Speaker to be announced)

r SORRY, "FALSTAFF,"
Your American Premiere
Will Simply Have To Wait
Holding Over!
"A SPL SY,SOAKED SLEEPER
BREATHTAKING! IMAGINATIVE!
The nicest surprise to happen in along time.
Unless you just enjoy turning your back
entirely on life, you should not miss the
breathtaking shots!"

I

,

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