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February 01, 1967 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-02-01

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-1

PAGE TWO,

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE TWO TIlE MICHIGAN DAIlY WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 1,1967

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 1967

MUSIC

PROTESTERS OUTSIDE:

A FAREWELL BENEFIT

Chamber Arts Concert Premiere Students Meet with Rusk;
Shows High Level Musicianship Leave with Stronger Doubts

I

By TONI PRATT
Monday night brought to Rack-
ham Auditorium a premiere per-'
formance of Music from Marlboro,
sponsored by the Chamber Arts
Series. This group is but one out-
standing example eminating from
the truly unique institution of the
Marlboro Music Festival in Ver-
mont. Founded in 1950 and under
the directorship of Rudolf Serkin,
Marlboro has become the summer
habitation for some ofrthe finest
musicians in the world. There
they gather for two months to ex-
change musical ideas and explore
chamber music repetoire in a com-
pletely informal atmosphere. And
the results of their efforts became,
through Monday's 'performance,
an audience's delight.
From the opening bars of Mo-
zart's Divertimento in D Major,
K. 251 the common denominator
of their musicianship became evi-
dent: precision. Under the super-
for leadership of Alexander Sch-

neider,
violist
Robert
Levine,

violinist Oswald Lehnert,
Walter Trampler, cellist
Sylvester, bassist Julius
oboist Leonard Arner, and

French horn players John Bar-
roweand Earl Chapin combined
their talents to present an invigo-
rating, yet tasteful interpretation
of Mozart. The divertimento, be-
ing a light symphonic work which
allows individuals to exhihit his
prowess, proved a perfect show-
case for the talents of the group,
particularly Schneider and Amner.
The singing tone of Schneider's
violin permeated the entire work,
while the round and mellow sound
of the oboe proved a perfect com-
plement to it.
Schubert's "Five Dances with
Coda and Seven Trios" is more an
experimentation with sounds and
contrasts than with individual in-
strumentation. Bravura, romance,
scherzo and march tempo all
found their way into Schubert's
work. Although these moods were

for the most part sustained, there (Continued from Page 1)
seemed to be a tightness in the did not stop. Our meeting today
group's sound which kept the further indicated we are willing
music from flowing freely. to concede almost nothing."
The Mozart Horn Quintet in E-, The conference came as a result
flat Major is a difficult piece, of a letter sent to President John-
testing French horn virtuosity, son in December, by 100 student
and Barrows' performance evi- presidents. Since then over 100
denced some of these problems. An additional signers were added, and
almost inhuman breath-control is editors. Secretary Rusk replied in
needed, and lack of such control a letter early this year.
caused many ragged edges in the The group announced yesterday
uper registers. Although Barrows it winl soon send another letter
possessed fully-adequate technical concerning the war to President
control, his approach to the work Johnson. The letter will be drafted
bordered on timidity which re-
flected in the spirit. Despite this by a number of student leaders re-
the fine accompaniment of the maining in Washington the rest
other members and Schneider's in- of this week, and will be sent to
fallable tone brought off the work the remainder of those involved
with satisfaction. as soon as possible for signing any
Undeniably, the climax of the subsequent release to the Presi-
Unenin ably, th climax po f dent. It is now expected that the
walzes; came whby anner und onetter will involve strong calls for
tz Th delightfulnner n onesnegotiations and American conces-
by isStrauss.Thsdeitflmn
iatures becamethrough a spirited sons toward those negotions.
interpretation obviously led by Student Government Council
Schneider, a species of practical President Ed Robinson expressed
jokes which inspired the audience surprise "that Rusk handled him-
to sudden outbursts of laughter. self to so poorly." He said he had
Music from Marlboro returned expected some of the student
to the enthusiastically-applauding
audience with the novelty encore leaders to be won over by Rusk.
of "Le Galoppe" by Strauss, bet- But, in fact, the opposite
ter known to the layman as the had happened. "The meeting was
main theme of the William Tell off the record. Rusk knew he
Overture (or of the Lone Ranger). couldn't be quoted directly, but
Both technically and musically, he was completely unwilling to
the high level of mature musician- put forth new facts and he offered
ship combined to bring Ann Arbor no workable alternative to the
audiences one of the finest con- present escalation, and gave no in-
certs of the season. dication that he was seriously in-

terested in negotiations," Robin-
son added.
Essentially the hour and a half
discussion centered around thej
possible outcome of present U.S.
policy and the conditions the ad-
ministration wants for peace nego-
tiations.
The leaders questioned Rusk on
what his conditions for a halt of
the bombing would be. Steve Cohen
President of the Colgate Student
body asked Rusk, "Do we have to
say 'you pull out before we nego-
tiate?' The situation is different!
now than it was during the first
two bombing pauses. We have al-
ready demonstrated our ability to
keep the country from being over-
run."
Greg Craig of Harvard referred
to three points for peace put forth
by U.N. Secretary General U
Thant and asked, "What incentive
have we given Hanoi to deesca-
late?" He also questioned the as-
sertion that the National Libera-
tion Front would not accept free
elections.
Rusk asked throughoutsthe con-
ference that the students answer
what concessions they wished from
Hanoi. He indicated that aggres-
sion fromNorth Vietnam into the
South was a challenge to U.S.
security arrangements.

Cohen said afterwards. "I think
the Secretary of State adroitly and:
purposefully avoided answering all
of our meaningful questions. His
avoidance of clarifying discrepan-
cies in administration statements
about willingness to negotiate, in-
dicates that we are not willing to
go as far as our public statements
imply."
The peace marchers at the
White House sent three of their
leaders to the White House and
to Capitol Hill to present a posi-
tion paper.
There was only one incident. A
man carrying a sign proclaiming
himself a "Polish freedom fighter,"
a supporter of President Johnson,
and a foe of communism, chained
himself to the White House fence.
He was cut free by guards and
hustled across Pennsylvania Ave-
nue by police to join the ranks of
the pro-government demonstra-
tors.

POETRY READING
BY
JEROME BADANES
(LEAVING FOR N.Y.
AND
MARTHA MAC NEAL ZWEIG
TONIGHT at 8:30
UNION BALLROOM
$1.50 per person
Tickets at: Fishbowl Table,
Voice Office, Centicore, and at the Door.
Sponsored by:
Voice-Students For a Democratic Society

I

Revelli Proposes Concert
Band for Non-Music Majors

I

By RON HIGGINS
A new concert band designed
specifically for' non-music majors
has been started by Director of
Bands William D. Revelli. The
new group, the Wolverine Band,
will be directed by Dr. Revelli and
will emphasize concert music. Re-
hearsals will be limited to one
night a week, Tuesday, and will
last only an hour and a half.
Membership is open primarily to
IAcross
Campus
THURSDAY, FEB. 2
7 and 9:05 p.m. - Cinema Guild
will present Georges Franju's "La
Tete Contre Les Murs" (Head
Against the Walls) in the Archi-
tecture Aud.
FRIDAY, FEB. 3
7 and 9:05 p.m.-Cinema Guild
will present George Franju's "La
Tete Contre Les Murs". (Head
Against the Walls) in the Archi-
tecture Aud.
7 and 9:05 p.m.-Cinema II will
present Richard Lester's "A Hard
Day's Night" in Aud. A.
SATURDAY, FEB. 4
7 and 9:05 p.m.-Cinema Guild
will present Akira Kurosawa's
"The Lower Depths" in the Archi-
tecture Aud.
7 and 9:05 p.m.-Cinema II will
present Richard Lester's "A Hard
Day's Night" in Aud. A.
8:30 p.m.-The University Mus-
ical Society Choral Union Series
will present a dance concert by
the Royal Winnipeg Ballet in Hill
Aud.
SUNDAY, FEB. 5
7 and 9:05 p.m.-Cinema Guild
will .'present Akira Kurosawa's
"The Lower Depths" in the Archi-
tecture Aud.a
TRAVEL BUY OF
1967
EUROPE-3 TOURS
$36900 include
AIRFARE - HOTELS
SIGHTSEEING
OPEN TO ANYONE .

non - music ma j o r s; however,r
music majors are also welcome.
Instruments will be available
to those who do not have them,
With 11 rehearsals scheduled, a
concert is planned near the end
of the semester.c
Although non-music majors are
eligible for all of the University
bands, many do not participate
because rehearsals are extremely
time consuming. Most of the pre-
viously established bands practice
three to five days a week.
It is also anticipated that more
students will audition for this
band since they will not have to
face the fierce competition of
music majors. The Wolverine
Band will offer a more relaxed at-
mosphere since the members real-
ize they are playing chiefly for
fun and enjoyment.
It is Dr. Revelli's hope that the
new band will prevent students
who enjoyed playing in their high
school bands and orchestras from
abandoning their instruments al-
together. The Wolverine Band will
enable students to participate in
a performing group at no expense
to their academic studies.

REFUNDS on TICKETS for
SIMON and GARFUNKEL
WILL BE GIVEN
TUESDAY, WEDNESDAY, THURSDAY
10:30 A.M.-5:00 P.M.
SAB Ticket Windows

i

Wi

I

AT THE ARK
ARNOLD KAUFMAN
on
"The Neutral University"
Fact, Ideal, or Myth?
9:00 P.M. Thurs., Feb. 1
1421 Hill St.

THIS WEEK
FEB. 2, 3
THURSDAY, FRIDAY
George Franju
LA TETE
CONTRE
SATURDAY, SUNDAY
AKIRA KUROSAWA'S
THE
LOWER
DEPTHS
ARCH. AUDITORIUM
7 &9:05 P.M.
-nSTILL ONLY 5Oc--

7-

-

"A SPLASH, SURF aSOAkED SLEEPER!
BREATHTAKING!IIMAGINATIVE!1
The nicest surprise to happen in a long time.
Unless you just enjoy turning your back
entirely on life, you should not miss the
breathtaking shots!"

P

f

Dial 8-6416

:J

Holding Again!
4th Week!

FILMi"- The New Yorker

"SUPERIOR OFF-BEAT, AND
ORIGINAL!-N.Y. TIMES
CRtUMBA P UR{S
aMCS MBON adN 8WS LN RUJRave
SUGGESTED FOR MATURE AUDIENCES
Wednesday 7 and 9
th
Ann Arbor, Michigan
x10 S. Fifth Avenue
761-9700

GRAND PRIZE WINNER
1966 CANNES FILM
FESTIVAL
CtAUOE G ROUX
PRESENTS
ANd AWOMAN

- -N
ABRUCE BROWN FILM IN COLOP

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SORRY, "FALSTAFF,"
Your American Premiere
Will Simply Have To Wait

I

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5-6290

HELD
OVER!

_.__

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I

ZERO MOSTL
PHILSILVERS -.
BUM b M1 N
In A MELVIN FRANK Production
HAPPENED ON TiE
KWAYTOT4E FORUM"
COLORbyDeLux* ''"ast'm UNITED ARTISTS -.-
SUGGTEOr ProgramInformation 2-6264
OW 1:00-3:00-5:05
7:15-9:25

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Contact
MR. M. VERGANO
CONLIN TRAVEL BUREAU
NO 2-5587-NO 2-5588

and NATIONALITY CLUBS
UNION-LEAGUE
of the University of Michigan
* Fri., Feb. 3 7:00OP.M.-12:30 A.M.
Sat., Feb. 4 1:00 P.M.-12:30 A.M.
Michig an Union
~ General Admission 50c
~ Variety Show 75c
Friday 8and 10
Saturday 7, 9,and 11
U nion R nmnn

I

4q

I1

L

it

Cinema 1
presents

I

UAC MUSKET '67
ut
@ur
the new musical

"Would you pss up
somethi.g you couldn't
help but enjoy?"
-Michigan Daily
about MUSKET '67
The Original Cast
Recording of
OUT OF OUR MINDS
is on sale at
Lydia Mendelssohn
Theatre during all
performances.
- . .I

THE BEATLES
in
A HARD
DAY'S NIGHT
rDr1 nAv .? '7 - D A A

I

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111 .f t WP: lfAin 'N iii 11

ill

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:I

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