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January 24, 1967 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-01-24

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY JANUARY 24, 1967

i

McKendall Films: Experience

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DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
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-11,

In Movement, Tones,

By ANDREW LUGG
The Creative Arts Festival last
night recognized film as art. David
McKendall, Chicago film maker,
presented three of his films at
the Architecture Aud.
In an imaginative preamble with
a first reluctant audience, Mr.
McKendall asked the audience to
closely examine and move their
thumbs. With his guidance, the.
audience came to a realization of
movement, texture and light. This
preamble serves well as an intro-
duction to the film maker as well
as his films.
The first film is best described.
as an investigation of the tones
and qualities of objects. Starting

from simple shots of a lake the
film develops into one of the most
beautiful abstracts I have seen in
a long time.
The major motifs of reeds and
water are -approached with im-
mense control, achieving great
freedom in terms of movement,
light and form. Uninterested in
ideas, Mr. McKendall captures the
intense changing quietness of the
reeds and water. He first concen-
trates in making us see, by swal-
lowing us in his images, and then
allows us to think about what we
are seeing.
Soon the viewer. looks at the
flowing water on the screen with
the same concentration he had

and Light
used on his thumb. Well prepared
by Mr-. McKendall, the viewer be-
comes aware of the rather hyp-
notical powers of movement. As
the reeds lean in a breeze, or the
speed of the flowing water quick-
ens, the meaning of the object
becomes insignificant. They be-
come not reeds, but movement.
The water loses its identity, which
is replaced by a rolling series of
light and dark images.
In the second film "Bike Day"
(1965), McKendall again captures
movement, light and tones, but,
with people rather than water.1
This time it is a series of bicycle
rituals at a high school. The mood
highly active and amusing. Any
dissatisfaction with his film is ab-
solved by the director's skill with
light, movement and images.
Mr. McKendall's films can be
enjoyable and critically praise-
worthy only if the individual view-
er is willing to cooperate with his
requirements. The director asks
only the basic requirement of any,
film maker-an active and atten-
tive eye.
The performance, co-sponsored
by Cinema Guild, will be given
again tomorrow night. Without
doubt, it is well worth seeing.
Rent, Buy, Sell ,Trad
Daily Classifieds

NASA To Precede Moon
Landing with Apoll Orbit
WASHINGTON (AP) - National Most of these checks can be
Aeronautics and Space Adminis- completed if necessary during the

The Daily Offilcal Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editor-
ial responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form, to
Room 3519 Administration Bldg. be-
fore 2 p.m. of the day preceding
publication and by 2 p.m. Friday
for Saturday and Sunday. General
Notices may be published a maxi-
mum of two times on request; Day
Calendar items appear once only.
Student organization notices are not
accepted for publication. For more
information call 764-8429.
TUESDAY, JANUARY 24
DayCalendar
Bureau of Industrial Relations Sem-
inar-"The Management of Managers":
146 Business Administration, 8 a.m.
Cinema Guild Experimental Series
Program-Architecture Aud., 7 and 9:05
p.m.
SCollege of Engineering Computer Lee-
ture-Brice Carnahan, Departments of
Chemical Engineering and Biostatistics.
"An Introduction to Digital Computers
and the MAD Language": Natural Sci-
ence Aud., 7:30 p.m.
Center for Russian and East European
Studies-Is holding an informational
meeting for all students interested in
a BA in Russian Studies in the Com-
mons Room of Lane Hall at 4:10 p.m.
today.
Special Lecture-Bill Eppick, field en-
gineer of Tektronix, Inc~, will speak on
"Theory and Applications of Oscillo-
scope to Electronic Measurement and
Research," today at 7:30 p.m. in Room
1300 of the Chemistry Bldg.

The 026 Keypunch: A 20 minute vi-
deo tape presentation on the operation
Df the 026 Keypunch will be shown
continuously on Mon., Jan. 23, Tues.,
Jan. 24, and wed., Jan. 25, in the
Blagdon Room in the Michigan League
from 8 a.m. until 5 p.m.
General Notices
Regents' Meeting: Feb. 17. Communi-
cations for consideration at this meet-
ing must be in the President's hands
not later than Feb. 2.
The Michigan Memorial-Phoenix Proj-
ect invites requests for faculty research
grants to support research within the
scope of the term "peaceful uses of
nuclear energy." The Project is par-
ticularly interested in studies concerned
with : Biological Effects 'of Radiation.
Radiation Disonetry, New Uses of Iso-
topes, New Tracer Techniques, Direct
Conversion of Nuclear Energy to Elec-

trical Energy, The Fusion Process, Plas-
mas as Related to Controlled Fusion,
Radiation Chemistry, Nuclear Weapons
Proliferation and Disarmament, Psy-
chological Attitudes Toward Nuclear
(Continued on Page 8)

tration officially scheduled yes-
terday its first manned Apollo
orbital mission for a launching no
earlier than Feb. 21.'
This will be a preliminary to1
the planned landing on the moon,
projected within the next threea
years.
The three-man crew will be'
launched between 10 a.m. and 3:30
p.m. EST into an orbit 101 to 153'
miles above the earth.
The. flight is "open ended" -
that is, of an indeterminate length..
If all goes satisfactorily it may
equal in length the 14-day Gem-
i 7 mission of Astronauts Frank
Borman and James A. Lovell, Jr.,
in December, 1965, the longest
manned space flight yet achieved.
The crew for the first American
three-man space journey will be
commanded by Virgil I. Grissom,
40, who made a suborbital flight
in a Mercury spacecraft July 21,
1961, and commanded the first
Gemini mission, a three-orbit
flight with Astronaut John Young
March 23, 1965.
Grissom's crew will consist of
Edward H. White II, 37, first
American to walk in space - he
flew with James A. McDivitt in
Gemini 4 in June, 1965-and Rog-
er B. Chaffee, 31, a newcomer to
space flight.
NASA said the purpose of the
first Apollo astronaut mission is
to check out the manned opera-
tion and performance of the
spacecraft, ground tracking and
control facilities.
Camputs
TUESDAY, JAN. 24,
8:00 a.m.-The Bureau of In-
dustrial Relations will hold a
seminar on "The Management of
Managers" in Room 146, Business
Administration.
8:30 a.m.-The Bureau of In-
dustrial Relations will hold a
seminar on "Managing for Im-
proved Morale and Productivity"
in the Michigan Union.
WEDNESDAY, JAN. 25
8:00 a.m.-The Bureau of In-
dustrial Relations will hold a
seminar on "The Management of
Managers" in Room 146, Business
Administration.
7:00 and 9:05 p.m. - Cinema
Guild will present an experimental
series program in the Architecture
Aud.
7:30 p.m.--College of Engineer-
ing Computer Lecture: Brice Car-
nahan of the departments of
chemical engineering and biosta-
tics will speak on "An Introduc-
tion to Digital Computers and the
Mad Language" in the Natural
Science Aud.

first five hours of the flight, NASA
said.
The crew is to accomplish eight
"burns" or in-space ignitions of
the 21,500 - pound - thrust engine
that represents the space propul-
sion system. This engine will pro-
vide thrust for mid-course guid-
ance correction on future flights
to and. from the.moon, and for
attainment of a lunar orbit and
for later departure from the lunar
orbit.
ORGANI ZATI ON
NOTICES
USE OF THIS' COLUMN FOR AN-
NOUNCEMENTS is available to officially
recognized and registered student or-
ganizations only. Forms are available
in Room 1011 sAB.'
w* w
Deutscher Verein, Kaffeestunde, Wed.,
Jan. 25, 3-5 p.m.,.3050 Frieze Bldg.
* * *
Scottish Country Dance Society, Danc-
ing, Wed., Jan. 25,.8-10 p.m., Women's
Athletic Bldg.
* **
Lutheran Student Chapel, Hill St. at
Forest Ave., class at 7 p.m., Jan. 24,
Prof. Paul Kauper, Law faculty: "Luth-
er, the Reformation and the Church."
* * *
India Students' Association, Repub-
lic Day celebration, Jan. 26, 8 p.m.,
Room 3,, Michigan Union. Speakers Dr.'
Richard Parks and Dr. L. J. Bhatt,
Indian refreshments served.

CINEMA I1
presents
Francois Truffaut's
JULES
AND JIM
CinemaScope
Starring JEANNE MOREAU
"An unforgettable film
not to be missed !"
-N.Y, POST
"Refreshing . . . dazzling
hilarious!"
-TIME

I

4'
.t

I

IL

1 1

N

Dial 8-6416

4m

HOLDING
OVER!
FIL.M"-The New Yorker
GRAND PRIZE WINNER
1966 CANNES FILM
FESTIVAL
CLAUDE G"OUX
PRESENTS
A MAN,
Argd A WOMAN

FRIDAY
and
SATURDAY
AUD. A.
ANGELL HALL

7 and
9:05 P.M.
50C

ft

I

L.III
I

ID required

I

DIAL
5-6290

DEAN
I MATT HELM
KARL MALDEN

TODAY
Shows at 1:00-2:55
4:55-6:55-9:05
ANN-
MARGRET
TECHNICOLORei

"SUPERIOR OFF-BEAT, AND
ORIGINAL I"!-N.Y. TIMES
MeS M 3SON ai LYs NNR 8ve
SUGGESTED FOR MATURE AUDIENCES
Tuesday 7 & 9
Michigan
210 S. Fifth Avenue
761-9704

A !OLUMBA oPICTURES RELEASE

n

p.'

I

STARTS FRIDAY
"The ENDLESS
"SUMMER"

NEXT
ATTRACTIONS
* *' .A

"AL IE"
IS COMING SOON

I

Program Information 2-6264

THIS WEEK:
WEDNESDAY
EXPERIMENTAL
SERIES, No. 2
"SCORPIO RISING"
"FIREWORKS"
by Kenneth Anger
"HALLUCINATION"
"RELIEF"
'STUDIO OF DR. FAUST"
by Peter Weiss
(director of Marat/Sade)
THURSDAY, FRIDAY
JAN. 26, 27
LOUISIANA STORY
A classic documentary.
SATURDAY, SUNDAY
ZERO DE CONDUITE
(ZERO FOR CONDUCT)
by Jean Vigo
7:00 & 9:05
ARCHITECTURE AUD.
STILL ONLY 50c

ENDS FRIDAY!

YES ! OH YES !

S[V[N IRIS.-RAY STARKA im ~tPARAMtOUNT PlC1WS Aw
TONY CURTIS
ROSANNA SCHIAFFIMO.
SARRIVEDERCI,
.
TEC IMC8LOR*PANAVISION A PARAMOUNT PICTURE
Feature times:
1:00-3:00-5:05-7:15-9:25

EIGHTEEN~ TIMES YES !
this Saturday-
THE DURANGO KID
in
"TWO FISTED STRANGER"
(plus Bugs Bunny AND Mighty Mouse)

Starts
SAT. 1

COMPLETE!

UNCUT!

CLEAN!

GIRLS! GIR'LS! 0
Q Don't miss the tryouts for
SESQUI-KETTES
Chorus Line
January 29 Union
8:00 3R=S
Music by the BRASS RAIL
om nC GomtY CoO{) O

30TERBUMy
330 Maynard

I

2:00 p.m.

25 cents

It

UAC MUSKET '67

O~ut

Of

TICKETS:
I Individual Sales
start
January 16
Lydia Mendelssohn
Box Office
10 A.M.-5 P.M.
All Seats $2.50

'4

@ur

TIT!- ~ 7

the new musical

CA N THE
WRITER-IN-RESIDENCE

( tilts t mN't

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