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January 22, 1967 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-01-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, JANUARY 22, 1967

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Explore Jazz Left and Right
In Arts Festival Symposium

Board Members Say Role
Won't Threaten Autonomy

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By PAUL HIRSCH
The University's annual jazzt
h; appening took place yesterday int
the form of an afternoon sympos-
ium and a concert by the Andrew,
Hill Quartet later in the evening.
Jazz has come to be defined as
whatever jazz musicians play,
often to the consternaton of their
audience, whose definitions of jazz
may differ markedly from the mu-
sicians.' The participants in yes-
terday's symposium divided into
shifting coalitions which seldom
seemed to communicate, much less
agree with each other.
All participants in the discus-

sion agreed that the jazz musician
has little access to money, and I

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that nightclub audiences can be
disconcerting to serious musicians.
Underlying their concensus, how-
ever, was a difference in their out-
looks which turned out to be ir-
reconcilable.
Members of the panel included
Prof. Robert Sklar of the history
department, Hill and Sam Rivers,
a member of the Hill Quartet,
John Sinclair and Charles Moore,
of the Detroit Artists' Workshop,
Jack Brokenshaw, a current night-
club owner, Bill McLarney, a cor-
respondent for Downbeat, a jazz
magazine, and Joseph Jarmon, the

L (continued from Page 1) and the proper staff to provide
of the prove that they can fulfill that information on this "extremely
most vocal spokesmanh need, Novak explained, complex area," Brennan explained.
avant-garde contingent. Leroy Augenstein, elected to the "I'm not sure at this point what
Controversy erupted over ques- board last November, pointed out form our involvement will take,
tions of politics, race, and art vs. that the board is nonetheless part since we don't want to duplicate
entertainment. In a haphazard of the executive branch of gov- the work of the governor's office.
sort of way, the topic of the sym-, ernment: the Legislature can We want to be meaningful and
posium-"The Relation of Jazz overrule its decisions. The board helpful," Brennan added.
to Society"-was farily well cov- advises first, and when the Legis- "The aim of the board is to
ered. latuie acts, the board executes. achieve maximum utilization of
Jamon and Rivers dealt imost Brennan said that involving existing facilities," Novak said.
directly with art and its relation members of the two other groups "The board has a constitutional
to olitics Explaining why he ..u .- f,. l i th,, , it" hac t

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UNION-LEAGUE
CREATIVE ARTS FESTIVAL
AND
CINEMA GUILD
PRESENT
DIRECTOR-IN-RESIDENCE

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Cutler: The Role
Becomes D ifficult

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refuses to play in a club, Jarmon
stated that the very nature of a
nightclub is a denial of the reality
which an artist is trying to ex-
press. Rivers suggested that there
is right-wing music (Lawrence
Welk), liberal music (conventional
jazz, bop), and left-wing music
(the "new thing").
Dizzy Gillespie was called an
entertainer as opposed to an ar-
tist by Hill and the other "left-
wing" musicians, which incensed
the critic from Downbeat who
sees no such separation of enter-
tainment from art.

vying for planning aunor iy -
namely the Legislature and the
individual governing boards--leads
to prestige for the board's deci-
sions. As Novak explains, "The
large degree of involvement will be
the springboard for implementa-
tion of the master plan and the
role of the board in coordination."
Predicts Greater Involvement
While the board has not yet
actively entered the area of
budgeting, Brennan predicts great-
er involvement in the future. The
feeling of the board has been that
it shouldn't go into budgeting un-
til the board has an understanding

responsibility to shepherd educa-
tion in the state."

11

(Continued from Page 1) I
But for many the student has
not come far enough. SGC's with-
drawal from the OSA last semes-
ter is testimony to this. And much
of the blame is heaped on Cutler
for building up student expecta-
tion and then riot delivering.
'The trouble with Cutler," says
one of his critics, "is that he is
a good guy. You talk to him and
he sounds like he's for you. Then
he turns around and makes a de-
cision which knifes you in the
back. His personal veto of the stu-
dent book store is an example.
"If he were an outwardly bad
guy you would know What to ex-
pect and it wouldn't hurt so much,

but this way you feel as if you
have been betrayed."
Heading the OSA is a rough
jo. The man isresponsible to the
Regents and yet his natural con-
stituency-or those who should be
his natural constituency-are the
students. He is subject to simul-
taneous pulls in opposite direc-
tions and is called upon to har-
monize two often conflicting in-
terests.
But Cutler does not seem out-
wardly bitter or resentful. On the
whole he says that he is satisfied
with the job and has enjoyed his
two years at it.
He appears proud that his 'cool'
Is undaunted.

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Psycholinguistic Degree:
Innovation in the Nation

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East Coast Students, Faulty
Form Pltea Aetion Group

(Continued from Page 1)
program. Students with graduate
work or a Master's degree in psy-
chology or linguistics can be ad-
mitted with advanced standing.
Any student interested in ap-
plying for the program is en-
couraged to write to the Rackham
School of Graduate Studies, and to
Tikofsky at 182 Frieze Building.
All students admitted to the pro-
gram will be given financial sup-
port, available through a variety
of sources including fellowships,
research assistantships or trainee-
ships.
Research and Training
Students will also be required to
participate in research and teach-
ing as part of their doctoral work.
Tikofsky pointed out that the Uni-
versity provides a wealth of op-
portunities for students to engage
in research related to psycholin-

guistics. The Center for Research
on Language and Language Be-
havior, the Center for Human
Growth and Development, the
Speech Clinic, the phonetics lab-
oratory, the English Language In-
stitute and the Mental Health Re-
search Institute were all cited as
active centers of research in this
field.
Representing its integrated na-
ture, the program's administrative
committee is composed of faculty
from the departments of psychol-
ogy and linguistics. Members of
the committee are: Profs. J. C.
Catford and Peter Fodale of the
linguistics department, and Profs.
David Birch, Frank Koen and Tif-
ofsky of the psychology depart-
ment. Fc dale is taking the place
:f Prof. Alan Keiler of the lin-
guistics department, on leave this
year.

SUGGESTED FOR MATURE AUDIENCES
Sunday 5, 7, 9
Ih
Ann Arbor, Michigan
210 S. Fifth Avenue
761-9700

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January 16

the new musical

Lydia Mendelssohn
Box Office
10 A.M.-5 P.M.
All Seats $2.50
Performances:
Date:
Fri.-Sun., Jan. 27-29
Wed.-Sat., Feb. 1-4
Time:
Fri. & Sat. Nights
7:00 & 9:30

By GREG ZIEREN
A group of Eastern college stu-
dents and teachers recently form-
ed an organization in New York,
the Student-Teacher Political Ac-,
tion Committee (STPAC). The
group will train both students and
teachers to run as candidates for
political office.
STPAC was founded last month
after several students and teachers
from Eastern schools met with
Senator Robert Kennedy (D-NY)
to ask for his public endorsement
of United Nations Secretary-Gen-
eral U Thant's proposal for a
Vietnamese peace. When Kennedy
refused, the students, who had
travelled by bus from many East
coast schools to Washington,
created STPAC and opened an
office in New York.
Aims for Viet Peace
According to members of ST-
PAC's temporary national commit-
tee, one of the main aims of the
group is to promote peace in Viet-
nam. The group proposes the ces-
sation of the bombing of North
Vietnam, the holding of U.N.-
supervised elections including can-
didates from the National Liber-
ation Front and a phased with-
drawal of all outside forces from
South Vietnam, both the United
States troops and her allies and
the North Vietnamese.

Another of its aims is support
of Martin Luther King and A.
Phillip Randolph's "Freedom
Budget." The budget, which has1
met with approval from certain
key union leaders, liberals, and
civil rights activists calls for
spending $10 billion during ten
years to eliminate poverty, dis-
crimination, and urban problems.
The group was further disturbed
by a reported National Security
Council vote of 5-2 to invade
North Vietnam late last year and
Chief Press Officer McClosky's
subsequent "no comment" reply
to a Harvard Crimson reporter
concerning the vote.
$3 Thousand Banked
Members of the National Com-
mittee indicate that they have al-
ready collected over $3,000 to ad-
vance their cause.
Future plans for STPAC include
the founding of a school to train
perspective student or teacher
candidates for political office. The
group has thus far rejected ran-
dom endorsements of candidates
not connected with STPAC and
sees "grass roots democratic polit-
ical action" as the only means of
adopting their program.
In addition, STPAC has plans
for placing full-page advertise-
ments on the back page of college
newspapers fiom thirty-five large
colleges across the country.

A4

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GUILD HOUSE.
-802 Monroe---
MONDAY, Jan. 23
NOON LUNCHEON 25c
Professor William Livant:
Student Power-"What It Means"
Students, register to vote-STICK WITH IT!

I

4TECHNICOLO'

11

You've got to be out of your iund
to get up at 6:30 a.m. to see
the Television' premiere of
MUSKET 67
OUT OF OUR MINDS

COMING: "THE ENDLESS SUMMER"
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GRAND PRIZE WINNER
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