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January 19, 1967 - Image 7

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-01-19

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THURSDAY, JANUARY 19,,1967

THlE MICHIGAN DILY

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Big

Ten

Ticket Prices: From 0 to $40

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/111/el

MChigan Admission Fees
Top Conference; NU Lowest

By BOB McFARLAND igan Sta
Student ticket policies in the the conf
Big Ten form a strange patch- enthusia
work of rules and regulations, with for a se
each institution developing its own Iowa, w
particular philosophy on the mat- not bee
ter. recent
About the only facet of the for cou
ticket programs which is common that th
to the entire Big Ten is money, supply
4 and even there, Northwestern pre- their pl
vents such a sweeping general-
ization to be made, by permitting Minn
its student admission at all ath- other s
letic events for free. students
Other student bodies are not so card wh
fortunate. Big time athletics re- all spor
quire enormous budgets, and most must ra
' athletic departments have adopted this div
the theory that student or no stu- t $15I
dent, everyone pays his fair share served s1
to go out and cheer on Saturday area ads
afternoons.
My Fair Share hockey,
But what is the fair share? all othe
There lies the nature' of the prob- card in
lem. Western Conference mem- tammen
bers, with the exception of al- sports.
r e a d y-mentioned Northwestern, Footb
charge for attendance at any- are rela
where from two to four sports, pared t
with Michigan leading the way. sports a
Football is the main course of roundba
the athletic fare in the Big Ten, Wiscons
' and this is amply reflected in while f
ticket prices. To see the Wolver- admissi
Ines, Wisconsin, Ohio State, Mich- Illinoi
SFreshm-_-an
By JOEL BLOCK I
At 8:00 tomorrow night in Yost
Field House Rudy Tomjanqvich
will play in his first intercolleg-
iate basketball game for the Uni-
versity of Michigan.
Those who have seen him in
action against the Law Club will
not be surprised when he pops in
his first 25-footer and then go on
to demoralize the Michigan State
freshmen.
Rudy is so good that MSU fresh-
man coach Bob Nordmann stated
flatly, "Tomjanovich? I scouted
hima lot last year. He's way ahead
of anybody we've got over here."
A high school All-America,
Toinjanovich scored more than 27
points per game in the first four'
freshman exhibition games. And
he's been pulled in all four of
those games for a replacement.
Resembles Lafayette
"Tomianovich is somebody very
special-like our Lee Lafayette,"
Nordmann went on. "He's a sure
bet for the next three years."
State coach Nordmann throws
plaudits freely on the freshman
out of Hamtramck High but
Michigan freshman coach Dick
Honig has some reservations. FROSE
"Rudy is a great offensive ma- the ho
chine, but he doesn't play as close averag
a defensive game as I'd like him expect
'to. The problem is that in high advent
# school, his coach probably didn't

;ate, and Illinois battle for
ference championship, grid
asts must pluck down $12
eason coupon. Indiana and
'hose football squads have
n favored with success in
years, set the price level
pons at $10, illustrating
e sacred economic laws of
and demand even have
ace in the athletic realm.
Minnesota Bargain
esota and Purdue have an-
ystem of admittance for
,s, as both sell an activity
hich admits the holder to
rting events. The Gophers
nk as the best bargain in
ision. For the paltry sum
the bearer receives a re-
eat for football, a reserved
mission for basketball and
and general admission to
r contests. At Purdue, the
eludes several other enter-
t functions in addition to
all admission procedures
atively simple when com-
o the current holder of
attention in the Big Ten,
ll. Michigan State and
in admit students free,
ive other schools charge
on.
s and Indiana prefer the
Cage j

The Culprit .. .

the student body free of charge.
The Illini seem to have taken a
hint from the Ohio State football
coupon plan, however, and the
athletic department at Champaign
sets an admission of $.60 for all
sports for those students not pur-
chasing a grid ticket.
Not exactly consistent? Well,
neither is the quality of each in-
stitution's athletic p r o g r a m s.
When a team does win with reg-
ularity, the trend often fore-
shadows a rise in student prices.
Commenting on the non-existent
ticket prices for basketball at
Michigan State, the Spartan man-
ager stated, "Yes, we let students!
in for free, but then again, we
haven't had an outstanding team
in a long time. If one comes along,
the policy will certainly be re-
examined."
Charity at Indiana
The price isn't necessarily al-
ways as high as the quality how-
ever. For instance, Indiana's pow-
erhouse tanker squads have rated
with the nation's top teams for
the past decade. Hoosier students
are still admitted free of charge
to swimming meets, though, and
on the same basis as paying pa-
trons. Conceivably, attendance at
a meet could be entirely students,
if they were first in line for
tickets.
The Wolverines and Spartans'
traditionally compete for the all-
sports crown in the Big Ten, and
are the only two institutions which
maintain high quality in every
sport.

season ticket system for basket-c
ball, the former charging $6 for
nine home games and the latter
asking $7 for eleven backyard en-
counters.c
Pay-As-You-Go
Here in Ann Arbor and also inJ
Iowa City, pay-as-you-go, $1 for
each contest, is the dictating prin-
ciple. And Ohio State manages to
fill its mammath field house reg-
ularly, although ranking at the
top of the list in cage prices. The
Buckeyes also use the football1
coupon as a convenient coercive
device, requiring that each studentl
present his football coupon and+
a crisp dollar bill before watching i
OSU play. But, as all seats in the1
St. John's Arena are reserved, an-
other quarter is added to the 1
ro ,Clash

charge for each basketball fan.
Hockey cops the third place
spot in sports interest, and cor-
respondingly, rates number three
on the ticket- scale. The Spartans
and Ohio State allow admittance
for 25c a game. At $1 a contest,
Michigan's fee is high enough to
warrant a first place tie with Wis-
consin. The Badger ticket man-
ager, Oscar Damman, maintains,
"The only reason we charge for
hockey is because we don't own
the arena."
Michigan's other admission price
holds the distinction of being the
only such charge. For each swim-
ming meet, the Wolverines na-
tator fans pay $1.
The remainder of athletic con-
tests in the Big Ten are open to

The avid Wolverine fan would
be $40 poorer if he attended every
home event during the fall and
winter trimesters. On the other,
hand, his Spartan counterpart
would have to pay only about $15
for the same privilege.
An additional factor which must
be considered in the setting of
student prices by the athletic de-
partments is the amount of each
student's tuition allotted to the
athletic budget, a figure which
varies sharply among conference
members, and partially explains
the difference in prices.
The only way to view your
favorite team and avoid paying in
the Big Ten is to move to Evan-
ston, become a member of the
press corps, or doff a uniform.
The choice is yours.
Globetrotter
Ta turn.Dies
,Suddenly
EL PASO, Tex. (R) - Reece
(Goose) Tatum, 45, who as a
member of the Harlem Globetrot-
ters thrilled audiences throughout
the world with his loose-jointed
talents for basketball and clown-
ing, died in El Paso yesterday
after an apparent heart seizure.
Tatum died at 10:17 a.m. at:
Providence Memorial Hospital,
which he had left only last Wed-
nesday after a week of treatment
for what was described as a liver
ailment.
After' taking a bath at his El
Paso home, Tatum complained to
his wife, Naomi, of pains and fell
on a bed, hospital administrator
Bob Byrne said. After being ad-
ministered external cardiac mas-
sage by the fire department, Ta-
tum was rushed to the hospital.
about 15 minutes before he died.
COLLEGE BASKETBALL
Rhode Island 92, Vermont 56
W~est Virginia 102, Pittsburgh 78
Evansville 70, Valparaiso 69
Miami (Ohio) 68, Ohio Univ. 56
Louisville 66, Dayton 50
Villanova 75, Xavier 59
NBA
Bostos 119, Cincinnati 106
Philadelphia 113, Detroit 105
Chicago 111, San Francisco 107
NHL
Montreal 3, All-Stars 0
KEEP AHEAD
OF YOUR HAIR
0 NO WAITING
- 7 BARBERS
r OPEN 6 DAYS
The Dascola Barbers
Near the Michigan Theatre

SABBATH SERVICE
Friday at 7:15 P.M.
DR. MICHAEL INBAR
Assistant Professor of Sociology
NEGRO-JEWISH RELATIONS
John Planer, Cantor and The Hillel Choir
will chant the Sabbath Music

f' '1

Steven Ovitsky, Choir Director
1429 HILL STREET

Joan Spitzer, Organist
ALL WELCOME

With Spartans

ing down the duties of being the
team's playmaker.
Fishman, whose father played
for Michigan in the "deadball"
era of the late thirties-when a
total score of 80 points for both
teams was considered astronom-
ical-is Honig's main replacement.
When Fishman scores, he does it
with style, either driving in for
an ,underhanded scoop shot or
lofting his left-handed jumper as
if he were aiming for the ceiling.
RED
Rick Bloodworth, the other
starting guard, is hard to miss on
the court. Not- only does his red
hair clash with the blue on his
uniform, but his scoring ability
(16.5 ppg) doesn't go unnoticed
for long by opposing guards.
Honig rates him, along with Tom-
janovich and Henry, in his "good
shot" category. Bloodworth will
have the job of shadowing the
other MSU guard, either 6'3"
Steve Kirkpatrick or 6'2" LaMarr
Thomas.
"The Animal" is 6'5", 205-pound
forward Bill Fraumann - and the
name should stick for awhile. Ho-
nig puts it this way: "If you want
aggressiveness, Fraumann will give
you all you need. He's a madman
on the boards. He'll go after the
ball whether it's in the air or on
the ground. He'll also put defen-
sive pressure on the men he's
guarding."
MSU Coach Nordmann has call-
ed 6'4" forward Bob Gale his
best offensive threat, and Honig
has singled out Fraumann to han-
dle the assignment of holding him.
Fraumann's aggressiveness has
not been all beneficial for both
him and the team. In the four
games he's played in, he's been
whistled for 18 fouls while fouling
out two of those games.

At 6'10" and 200 pounds, cen-
ter Mike Lawson doesn't resem-
ble Michigan's "Bloody Nose Lane"
habitants of the past four years.
Lawson injured his ankle and sat
out the freshnian game before the
Northwestern contest. Then when
he began practicing with the squad
again, he suffered additional mi-
nor but bothersome injuries to the
same foot.
He's shaken those off now, and
Honig has hopes for the Holland
High School product. "Don't let
his weight fool you, he has learn-

YOU KNOW WHERE
YOU'RE GOING
(Nowwe'll tell you howtogetthere)
Go McDonnell. Because when you join
McDonnell,you'll work for a world-renowned
name that stands for leadership and excel-
lence in the aerospace industry. You will
grow professionally by working in an envi-
ronment conducive to achievement, along-
side scientists and engineers who have
outstanding technical reputations. And
you'll build your future with a research-
oriented company that's receptive to new
ideas. You will also earn an excellent salary
and enjoy liberal fringe benefits with a com-
pany that is known for stability.
At McDonnell you also get the chance to
put your personal touch on things while
helping the team to make a contribution to
aerospace science. In addition to getting
management recognition for outstanding
accomplishments, you'll have the satisfac-
tion of knowing that you used your head to
get ahead.
The McDonnell recruiter will show you how
your degree in science or engineering can
help you get where you're going. Be sure to
chat with him when he's at your campus
placement office on January 25 and 26.
P.O. Box 516, St. Louis, Missouri 63166
An Equal Opportunity Employer

-Daily-George Junne
H FORWARD Rudy Tomjanovich stuffs the ball through
oop at yesterday's practice session. Standing at 6'7", he has
ged 27.3 points-per-game in four freshman contests, and is
ed to spark the Wolverines ink their first intercollegiate
tore tomorrow night with MSU.

igan State attack Rudy will need
some help. He'll get it from a
couple of pint-size guards, an-
other 6'3" "normal" guard (if you
can be called normal with close-
cropped bright red hair), a for-
ward called "The Animal" by his
teammates, and an underweight
6'10" center with a love for pun-
ishment.
When captain and starting
guard Mark Henry and sixth man
Steve Fishman were asked their
heights for the varsity program,
they probably had illusions of
grandeur when they put down
6'0" and 5'10" respectively. Both

added an inch to their actual
heights for respectability but their
worth can't be measured in inches.
Hoosier Hot-Shot
Henry, who comes from North
Side High in Fort Wayne, Ind.,
missed out on a basketball tender
but could be Michigan's biggest
"walk-on" in several years.
"Henry is our best defensive
guard and I'm going to put him
on Lloyd Ward, State's fastest
player and best driver," said
Honig.
At the other end of the court,
Henry isn't hurting either with an

MIKE LAWSON
ed to take a lot of abuse under
the boards. Playing against Tom-
janovich and Fraumann in prac-
tice has built up his stamina."
Even with a Rudy Tomjano-
vich, Honig doesn't think, of the
frosh squad as a one-man team.
"We're just going to run our plays,
getting the 15-foot jumper or lay-
up for anyone who's able to take
it. I think we're going to hurt them
defensively and that's the way we
are going to win."
But oh, can Rudy shoot!

Pick up eight...
,! , great!

11.0 scoring

Freshman Basketball

average, besides hold-
Statistcs
PCT. P AVG.

Attention Contact Lens
Wearers
Save 35% On Wetting Solution

RICK BLOODWORTH

want him to risk fouling out by
guarding his man tightly."
With that type of education,
TomJanovich's' lack of defensive
aggressiveness is expected.; But
what isn't expected is his affinity
for blocking shots.
'Rudy will just wait in the lane
for some guard to shoot through
and go up for a lay-up," remark-
ed one of his teammates. "Then
he'll snuff the poor guy out just
like a candle."
In order to snuff out the Mich-

Tomjanovich
Lawson
Bloodworth
Henry
Fraumann
Fishman
Canady
Dobson
Weiland
Schade
Christman
Aude

FG
50-93
24-43
29-53
20-50
17-49
9-26
3-9
2-6
2-6
2-5
1-2
1-6

PCT.
53.8
55.8
54.7
40.0
35.0
34.6
33.3
33.3
33.3
40.0
50.0
17.0

FT
9-23
10-15
8-14
4-9
7-13
1-4
0-0
1-2
1-3
1-1
0-2
0-0

39.0
66.7
57.1
44.4
54.0
25.0
0
50.0
33.3
1.000
.00
0

12
7
12
10
18
2
0
0
4
4
1
1

27.3
19.3
16.5
11.0
10.3
4.8
2.0
1.7
1.7
1.7
.7
.7

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