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January 19, 1966 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-01-19

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIG-..' AN AA TT IRFU N .

- ... as ... .. flvaaavta l iiAIT'

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 19, 1966

5.

,... . ,, . .... t . .. :. . _ LL i

Heat, Water
Problems Hit'
U' Towers c
(Continued from Page 1)
caused by a minority fringe of the
student residents, Meyers said.
"Considering all the damage be-
ing done, the residents aren't pay-
ing enough rent. But most of the
trouble is being caused by a fringe
minority that has no respect for
the rights of others and want
rights only for themselves," he
said.
Because of the high costs of
building maintenance, interest on
loans, taxes on real estate and
personnel wages, amortization of
the building is not expected for at
least 30 or 35 years, the manager
noted.
"We employ nine security men
just to stop unauthorized outsiders
from entering the building,"
Meyers noted. But there seems to
be no foolproof way of keeping
nonresidents from coming in to
watch television or play pool.
Meyers noted that a mixer held
last Friday night on the premises
had been a "big mistake which we
won't make again." The crowd
in the lobby and lounge grew so
big at times that residents had
difficulty reaching elevators to
get to their apartments. Most of
those attending the mixer were
nonresidents and even non-
students, contrary to its original
purpose, which was to provide a
social opportunity for building
residents.
A $25 refund on the monthly
rental was offered to the residents
in November because of incon-
veniences suffered when the build-
ing first opened in late August.
2ND WEEK
Direct from its
Roadshow Engagement

Across Campus

WEDNESDAY, JAN. 19 atre Program will present the'
Noon-Toby Hendon, director of American Conservatory Theatrea
Children's Community School, will Company in Edward Albee's "Tiny
discuss A. S. Neill's "Summerhill" Alice" at the Lydia Mendelssohn
in 2 Michigan League. Theatre.

7 and 9 p.m. - The Cinema
Guild will present Felix Green's
"China" in the Architecture Aud.
7:30 p.m.-Brice Carnaham of
the Depts. of Chemical Engineer-
ing and Biostatistics, will speak
on "An Introduction to Digital
Computers and the MAD Lan-
guage" in Angell Hall, Aud. A. '
8 p.m.-The Professional The-

THURSDAY, JAN. 20
2:15 p.m.-Monica Blumenthal
of the Dept. of Psychology will
speak on "Mental Health in Per-
sons Heterozygous for Phenylke-
tonuria" in 1057 MHRI.j
7 and 9 p.m. - The Cinema
Guild will present William Well-
man's "Public Enemy" in the Ar-
chitecture Aud.

7:30 p.m.-Robin Banlow, as-
sistant professor of economics, will
speak on "Economic Policy in
Egypt," at an open meeting of
Drlta Phi Epsilon, the foreign
service fraternity, in the Inter-
national Center.
8 p.m.-The Profesional Theatre
Program vill present the Ameri-
can Conservatory Theatre Com-
pany in Edward Albee's "Tiny
Alice" at the Lydia Mendelssohn
Theatre.
8:30 p.m.-Phyllis Curtin, so-
prano, will present a concert in
Hill Aud.

The University Musical Society
presents
PHYLLIS CURTIN1
RENOWNED SOPRANO OF THE METROPOLITAN OPERA

United Nations Starts Fight on Illiteracy

By The Associated Press
UNITED NATIONS, N.Y.-UN
experts are making a small be-
ginning toward a large campaign
aimed at ridding the world of
illiteracy within a generation. ,
The campaign has the blessing
of the UN general assembly. It
is getting UN technical assistance.
But it was planned and is being
supervised by the UN Educational,
Scientific and Cultural Organiza-
tion (UNESCO).
UNESCO, a UN specialized
agency with headquarters in Paris,
estimates that .in the middle of
this century around 700 million
people over 15 years old, or more
than two-fifth of the world's
adult population, were illiterate-
that is. unable to read and write.
It figures that around 500 mil-
lion of these were in Africa, Asia

and Latin America. Three years
ago it worked out a program to
make 330 million of the 500 mil-
lion-all of them under 50-
literate in 10 years at a cost of'
$1.9 billion.
Program Too Costly
But that program was found to
be too costly and complicated to
tackle right off the bat. So two
years later UNESCO proposed that
the campaign start as an experi-
ment in only eight countries to be
spread over five years at an es-
timated cost of $33 million.
The experiment is meant to
show how to get people interested
in learning to read and write, how
much it costs to teach them, how
their new learning can benefit
them and how it can help develop
their countries.
Rene Maheu, U'NESCO's direc-
tor-general, told the general as-

sembly's economic committee the
other day that 40 countries had
asked to be allowed to take part
in the experimental program.
The eight chosen to do so were
Algeria, Guinea, Mali, Tanzania,
Iran, Pakistan, Ecuadorrand Ven-
zuela. They have illiteracy rates
ranging from 32.7 per cent of the
population over 15 years old in
Ecuador, up to an estimated 95-
99 per cent in Guinea and Mali,
compared with 2.5 per cent in
the United States.
From one to three UNESCO ex-
perts-economists and educators
paid by the UN Expanded Program
of Technical Assistance-are now
in each of the eight countries on
short-term assignments costing no
more than $100,000 all told.
Joint Financing
They are helping the govern-
ments prepare requests for more
costly literacy training projects to
be financed jointly by those gov-
ernments and by a larger THIN
technical aid agency, the Special
Fund.'
Those projects are to wind up by
1970. They are intended to prove
that literacy training is of such
value to national economic de-

velopment that plenty of money
to pay for it will be forthcoming
both from national and inter-
national sources.
Maheu summed the situation up
like this: . "
"We are ready for action ---
"For the first time, the world
appears to be materially, techni-
cally and psychologically able to
eradicate illiteracy in a relatively
shortatime, perhaps within one
generation."

i n recital
THURS., JAN. 20
8:30 P.M
IN HILL AUDITORIUM
Program of music by Rossini, Schubert, Richard
Strauss, Berlioz, Debussy and Surinach.
Tickets:
$5.00-$4.50--$4.00-$3.50-$2.50$ .50

1

9Ot~ C.ntvry.Foe

UNIVERSITY MUSICAL SOCIETY, BURTON TOWER
(Phone: 665-3717, 9:00 A.M. to 4:30 P.M. also,
Box Office, Hill Aud., Thurs. Eve., 7:00 P.M.)

_--

y

Panhel Votes on New Unit,
Expected To Be Very Close

L -
Y.

r.

NO SEATS RESERVED
Shows at 1:15-3:50-6:30-9:00
Mats. $1.25; Eves. & Sun. $1.50

I

present..
20th Cettry-Fo
-J

TODAY AT 8:00 P.M.

(Continued from Page 1)
only action taken by the SGC
committee in the past year has
been their request for all houses
to submit their membership rec-
ommendation forms for review by
the SGC committee. These forms
are used by alumnae to recom-
mend rushees to sorority actives,
and many houses cannot pledge a
girl unless she has at least one
"recommend."
Originally, the vote on the Pan-
hellenic committee was supposed
to take place at the end of last
semester, but, according to Miss
Fitch, the presidents' council felt
that they needed more time to
discuss the matter and to get rem
actions from their national orga-
nizations.
Postponement
Early this semester, Panhel
planned to vote on 'the matter
today, but postponed it once!
again, this time because of rush.
Miss Fitch said that the time re-
quired for rushing made it diffi-
cult for the presidents to find time
for a meeting, and added that,
whether or not the committee is
formed, "the publicity would be
confusing to rushees. Most of
them don't understand the issue
of discrimination, and we didn'ti
want to' spend all of final des-
serts explaining it."
As far as the actual situation
concerning sorority membership
selection goes, this spring is the
first time that the two Negro
sororities on 'campus, Alpha Kap-
pa -Alpha and Delta Sigma Theta.
have participated in regular Pan-
hellenic -rush.
Until now, they have had an
associate rush, which was held at
the same time as ordinary rush,
but participation was . optional
for rushees. This semester, using
the houses of Lambda Chi Alpha
and Trigon fraternities, the two

sororities met 'all 1,125 rushees
during first set.-'
Final Desserts
Brendon Hudson, '68, rush
chairinan of Delta Sigma Theta,
said 'yesterday that two white girls
.have participated in third set and
have been invited to final des-
serts with her sorority.
Brenda Jones, '68, rush chair-
man of Alpha Kappa Alpha, re-
ported that some white girls will
be returning to her sorority, but
declined to say how many.
Miss Fitch said that the two
fraternities who lent their houses
"have been really wonderful."

PROFLSSIONAL THEATRE
PROGRAM

,u'e4eh t4

A.C.T.-
AMERICAN CONSERVATORY
1 THEATRE

_

COLR BY DE LUXE
CINEMASCOPE

"Tantalizing !"
"Stunning !

-N.Y. Times
-N.Y Post

DIAL 8-6416
ENDING TONIGHT
"WAY-OUT...FUNNY!
IF YOU'RE LOOKING
FOR A FILM THAT'S
DIFFERENT, THIS
IS CERTAINLY IT!"
-William Wolf, Cue Magazine
It's
Murderously
JOSEPH E. LEVINE Funny
presents
MARCELLO MASTROIANNI'
URSULA ANDRESS
Mn EMBASSY PICTURES Release COLOR
Thursday
"The Knack & How To Get It"

"Wildly imaginative!"
-Saturday Review
"Electric excitement!"
-Pittsburgh Press

EDWARD ALBEE'S CONTROVERSIAL
NEW DRAMATIC HIT
Under the direction of William Ball

MENDELSSOHN THEATRE

JAN. 11---JAN. ,

3 NON-SUBSCRIPTION PERFORMANCES
FRI., JAN. 21 GOOD SEATS AT BOX OFFICE

SUN., JAN. 23

PHONE 668-6300

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PTP ,W'enet4 A.C.oT.

U

BALLROOM DANCE LESSONS

LATE, LATE
SHOW
11 P.M.
Fri. and Sat. Nights
JAN. 21-22

Tuesdays
7-9 P.M.

Feb. 1-March 8
$6.00

I

POPULAR DANCE LESSONS

Wednesdays'
7-9 P.M.

Feb. 1-Feb. 23
$4.00

s
Cip Fp1,

BRIDGE I LESSONS

Tuesdays
7-8:30 P.M.

Feb. 1-March
$6.00

15

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