100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 16, 1966 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-01-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I

SUNDAY, JANUARY 16,196e?

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

rAGE T EN

STJND4Y, JANUARY 16, 196~ TIlE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE THREE

I

+ Nigerian

Army

Rebels

New Indian Leader,
Kashmir Discussed

1Hold
LONDON (P4)-Rebellious Niger-
ian Army troops seized Prime
t Minister Sir Abubakar Tafewa
Balewa yesterday and announced
they had taken control of the
country. A broadcast last night,
however, said the Army chief re-
mained loyal to the government
and had regained control of the
Nigerian capital, Lagos.
A Radio Lagos broadcast, heard
in Cotonou,, Dahpmey, said Gen.
Aguiyu Ironsi, the Army com-
mander, still had control of part
of the Army and was "taking nec-
essary measures to put down the
mutiny."
The broadcast said that in addi-
tion to the prime minister, the
Army rebels also had seized the

IOfficials,

Rio

PRESBYTERIAN CAMPUS CENTER
1432 Woshtenow Avenue
presents the 1965 film
"DECISION TO DROP THE BOMB"
(based on an NBC White Paper)
STUDENT PANEL FOLLOWING
-ALL STUDENTS WELCOME

finance minister, Chief Festus
Okotie Eboh. It said the where-
abouts of both were unknown.
Previous broadcasts said they had
been under house arrest..
Assassination
Two political leaders were re-
ported assassinated.
Earlier, Radio Lagos carried a
broadcast by an unidentified but
apparently high-ranking Army of-
ficer saying the Army had taken
power "to bring an end to gangs-
terism and disorder."
The later broadcast said a
"mutinous general," not named,
had taken brief control of the
radio station but that "Gen. Ir-
onsi now has control of the situ-
ation."

The situation outside the capital
was not known. Refugees fleeing
to Dahomey firom adjacent Ni-
geria reported bloody incidents
near the frontier.
The distance between Cotonou
and Lagos is about 60 miles.
A broadcast monitored in the
Ivory Coast identified the muti-
nous unit as the 16th Regiment.
It was not immediately known
whether this was the only Army
unit in rebellion.
Loyalists in Control
Troops loyal to the government
were said to be in control of pub-
lic buildings in the capital.
Normal channels of communi-
cation with Lagos were shut down.
But reports reaching London

said the premier of the Northern
Region of Nigeria, Surdar Ahmado
Bello, and his wife had been as-
sassinated. Chief Samuel I. Akin-
tola, premier of the Western Re-
gion, also was killed, the reports
said.
Makarios Safe
President Makarios of Syprus
is visiting in Lagos but "there is
no fear for his safety," authori-
tative sources in London reported.
Earlier, Cypriot High Commission
sources in London expressed fears
that Makarios, who is a Greek
Orthodox archbishop, had been
placed under house arrest.
Murder, arson and general law-
lessness have been spreading
across Nigeria for several months
arid reached Lagos area last week-
end.
The rioting and violence packed
hospitals with victims mutilated
by spears, axes, arrows and acid.
It was politically inspired.
Power Struggle
Since last October, Sir Abuba-
kar has been under considerable
attack by opponents who claimed
he rigged elections in Western
Nigeria in order to keep power in
the federation as a whole.
His political allies had believed
that by playing host at the first
top-level conference of the Com-
monwealth to be held outside Lon-
don, Sir Abubakar had strength-
ened his internal position.
But it appears .that the depar-
ture of the Commonwealth lead-
ers was a signal for upheaval.

NEW DELHI (k')-The govern-
ment radio yesterday quoted
President Kumaraswami Kamar-
aj as saying "almost all" state
chief ministers favor Indira Gan-
dhi as the next prime minister of
India.
Mrs. Gandhi, daughter of the
late Prime Minister Jawaharlal
Nehru, thus appeared to gain a
strong boost in the race to be-
come this country's next leader.
Such a declaration from Kam-
araj, head of the governing Con-
gress party, carries immense
weight in Indian politics.
Elections
The Congress party next Wed-
nesday elects a new parliamentary
leader, who is asked to form a gov.
ernment.
The race began Tuesday with
the death of Prime Minister Lal
Bahadur Shastri, who succeeded
Nehru in June, 1964.
Home Minister Gulzari Lal Nan-
da, sworn in to replace Shastri,
opened a campaign to keep the
job permanently.
Private Talks
Kamaraj spent the day confer-
ring privately with politicians
from throughout India. He re-
ported that of 14 state chief min-
isters he met, 11 had announced
support of Mrs. Gandhi. One of
Kamaraj's aides reported a twelfth
chief minister later declared for
Mrs. Gandhi.
The surge of support for Mrs.
Gandhi followed a strong bid by
Morarji Desai, leader of the par-
ty's right wing.
Many of the party's proffes-
sional politicians fear that De-
sai ,a controversial figure, would
harm party unity and thus cre-
ate trouble at the polls next year.

LONDON (P)-British authori-
ties are convinced Soviet Premier
Alexei N. Kosygin promoted the
India-Pakistan accord of Tashkent
with backing from President Lyn-
don B. Johnson.
On the surface the encourage-
ment appears implicit rather than
explicit. But officials in London
believe there was behind-the-
scenes coordination b e t w e e n
Washington and Moscow to get
India and Pakistan to Tashkent.
'India's late Premier Lal Baha-
dur Shastri and President Mo-
hammed Ayub Khan of Pakistan
both knew that resumption of
American financial and other aid
depended on their coming to
terms. This aid was stopped when
heavy fighting began over Kash-
mir late last summer.
In addition India, facing the
threat of famine this year, was
made acutely aware that pros-
pects of emergency food shipments
could be jeopardized by any re-
newal of war.
And Ayub, at his December
meeting with the President in
Washington, was left in no doubt
about Johnson's dislike for Paki-
stan's flirtation with Red China.
In Washington, officials said
that the calling of the Tashkent
meeting was done entirely on So-
viet initiative without prior con-
sultation with the United States.
But once that step was taken it is
understood that the United States
made clear to Russia through di-
plomatic dhannels that it welcom-
ed the Soviet move and hoped the
meeting would be successful in
producing an accord.
This attitude was also express-
ed publicly, and following the
Ayub-Johnson conference, U.S. of-
ficials said they welcomed- the
Tashkent session.
If you've never flown an
airplane.
just $5 puts you
at the controls of a
Cessna 150
For only $5 you can sit in the pilot's
seat alongside a government-li-
censed instructor and fly a Cessna
150 while he explains and demon-
strates how easy a Cessna handles.
Later you'll be presentedha flight
log with your first flight lesson
entered...a permanent record that
is yours to keep and add to!
You can fly every day or once a
week or whatever your time will
allow.
Call Today, FLY NOW
MICHIGAN'S LEADING
CESSNA DEALER
TWINING AVIATION, Inc.
Ann Arbor Municipal Airport
ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN
NOrmandy 3-9321

Sunday, January 16

French Room

7 P.M.

-i

the

11

CANTERBURY HOUSE
presents
a
BLACK WALL

IIll

Ii

who will

present

CORY MULLEN
doing folk things
and others

8:30 p.m.

218 N. Division

one dollar per person

world News Roundup

PRIME MINISTER Sir Abubakar Tafewa Balewa of Nigeria, who was reportedly ousted by re-
bellious army troops, and Cyprus President Archbishop Makarios, who is visiting in the Nigerian capi-
tol but is said to safe.
DENIED SEAT-
GOP Senator's BackPacifist

By The Associated Press I
OAKLAND, Calif. - Four men
accused of dropping anti-Viet
Nam war leaflets from an unlight-
ed plane over the San Francisco
Bay area were in jail yesterday.
Their' flight Friday night was
tracked by two radar stations and
a plane piloted by the sheriff's
air patrol, said Sgt. Carl Dahl of
the Oakland police intelligence
unit.
RIO DE JANEIRO-Thousands
of evacuees returned to the hill-
side slums of Rio de Janeiro yes-
terday after being washed out by
four days of floods and landslides
which took a toll of more than
400 lives.

WASHINGTON

battle in the historic conflict be-
tween federal authority and states'
rights reaches a showdown in the
U.S. Supreme Court this week.
Immediately at issue is the
constitutionality of the 1965 Vot-
ing Rights Act, which abolished
literacy and other voter qualifi-
cation tests in seven states of the
Deep South.
TOKYO-Communist China has
lodged another strong protest with
the Indonesian government,
charging "murder" of Chinese
nationals in Indonesia by anti-
Chinese demonstrators, the New
China News Agency reported yes-
terday.

- A major

program schedule
THE
NEW YORK
PHILHARMONIC
ORCHESTRA
Tune in the Philharmonic each Sunday at 2:00 p.m.,
(WUOM-FM, 91.7 on your dial), brought to you through
special arrangements between the University of Mich-
igan, Ann Arbor Federal and the Liberty Music Shop.
The current program schedule is:
Sunday, January 16
STEINBERG, Conducting; DE LARROCHA, Pianist
Schubert: Symphony No. 5; Mozart: Piano Concerto, K488;
Busoni: Tanzwalzer; Rachmaninoff: Symphonic Dances.
Sunday, January 23
STEINBERG, Conducting; CORIGLIANO, Violinist
Brahms: Haydn Variations; Lalo: Symphonie Espagnole;
ANN ARBOR FEDERAL SAVINGS
and LIBERTY MUSIC SHOP
JOIN THE DAILY, BUSINESS STAFF

WASHINGTON (P) - Eight
Republican members of Congress
last night called the refusal of
the Georgia Legislature to seat
H. Julian Bond "a dangerous
attack on representative govern-
ment."
Bond, 26, a Negro, was denied
his seat because of his support
of a statement calling U.S. in-
*volvement in Viet Nam "aggres-
sion and his saying he admired
the courage of draft card burners.
Three GOP senators and five
representatives issued a statement
declaring the legislature's action
threatens American political free-
dom.
"The Georgia Legislature has
repudiated an honest and open
election on the sole ground that
the elected representative endors-
ed unpopular 'views," they said.
"None of us agree with Mr.
Bond's views on the Viet Nam
war; in fact, we strongly repudiate
* these views. But unless otherwise
determined by a court of law,
which the Georgia Legislature is
not, he is entitled to express
them."
The statement was signed by
Sens. Clifford P. Case of New Jer-;
sey, Hugh Scott of Pennsylvania
and Jacob K. Javits of New York.
Along with Reps. Silvih 0. Gon-
tee, Massachusetts; Frank J.
Horton, New York; Joseph M
McDade, Pennsylvania; F. Brad-
ford Morse, Massachusetts, and
Stanley R. Tupper, Maine.
They said as members of a po-
litical minority 'themselves they
are "actively conscious of the
dangers involved in suppressing
minority rights of any kind."
They said the views of an elect-
ed representative on an important,

ground for refusing him his seat.
"The whole purpose of repre-
sentative government," they said,
"is to reflect the views of all the
people in the composition of their
legislative bodies and to permit
the free determination of policy as

the result of open debate.
"If unpopular views are to be
arbitrarily excluded, as they have
been in the Georgia Legislature,
then the legislative process, free
elections and free speech can have
no meaning."

Riots Overshadow
Arrest, Memorial

BOAC will
leave you alone
in Europe.

TUSKEGEE, Ala. (P) - Sheriff
Harvey Sadler said a group of
young Negroes threw rocks and
bottles in Tuskegee yesterday after
one of them was arrested. He said
he has called on the governor to
send state troopers to aid local
officers.
Sadler said about 30 pickets,
most of them Tuskegee Institute
students, "went wild" after one
of their number was arrested on
a warrant sworn out by the op-
erator of a drug store.
According to the Macon County
sheriff, the demonstrators, their
numbers growing quickly, hurled
rocks and bricks through about
14 windows, including those of
the Tuskegee News and an auto
supply store, and "climbed all
over the Confederate monument"
in the center of town.
Negro College
Sadler said, "We couldn't con-
trol them with the number of of-
ficers we had." He added that a
group of instructors from Tuske-
gee Institute, a predominantly
Negro college, broke up the melee
and the demonstrators went back

In Hattiesburg, Miss., a memo-
rial march for a civil rights leader
slain by a fire-bomb attack on his
home swirled into an uproar yes-
terday when police arrested a
marcher.
The tense situation - teetering
on the brink of violence-was fin-
ally eased by civil rights leader
Charles Evers' bellowed pleas and
commands.
The uproar came when two city
officers forced their way into the
ranks of the some 500 marchers
to seize a Negro they said was
drunk.
Precedes Funeral
The march was staged in down-
town Hattiesburg shortly before
the funeral for Vernon Dahmer,
58, former president of the For-
rest County branch of the Na-
tional Association for the Ad-
vancement of Colored People.
In contrast to the march, the
funeral was a scene of quiet
weeping at a little church about
five miles outside Hattiesburg.
There was a scattering of whites
among the 1,000 who attended.

On a swinging BOAC Grand
Orbit student tour you can ex-
plore the coast of Portugal,
gaze at the Rif Mountains of
Morocco, take an Adriatic
cruise, visit the Islands of Greece,
absorb culture in Spain, France,
Italy and England, find yourself
a Scandinavian viking, lift your
stein in Germany, Switzerland
and Austria, play roulette in
Monaco, and have plenty of
time to roam around on your
own. The whole package will
cost you $1921.30* round trip
from New York. And that in-
cludes most meals, hotels and
everything else. (You can also
jet BOAC direct from Miami,
Boston, Chicago, Detroit, San
Francisco, or Honolulu. And
join the group in London.)
To be sure you get what you
pay for we hired some young
tour leaders from Oxford and
Cambridge and told them not to
bug you.
They were all for it.
They said that's the only kind
of tour they'd be interested in

leading anyway. And that they
weren't above a little freedom
themselves while working their
way through college.
So that's the kind of deal
you'll get on a BOAC student
tour of Europe this summer.
Clip the coupon for more
facts. And cut out for Europe.
*Based on economy jet fare and double
or triple occupancy in hotels.
2~BOAC
AND BOAC CUNARD
Serrie operated for BOAC CUNARD by BOAC
---------------
British Overseas Airways
Corporation Dept. BE-178. I
Box No. W~ 10, New York,
SN.Y. 10011. MU 7-1600.
SPlease send me details on the
S1966 Student Tour Program.,
Name
Address
City
State Zip Code -I
I S....-.-.. .... e.... .-......
L------------

public issue do

not constitute to the college.

... ..... .. .... ..}: :.::.v :. . ...... .......... ... .. ..... ... ..........x:. .. : ::r:::Y}}: <>r..,:..v.vv.. . . ..'>:r.......:.....' r}:.; v:::...:.,...... : .--:-- .... . .:.. Y. . .
h,.v:: :;:::": .-:.:.... :.. :v.:w . . ..<.:..::..v..W. 4::}" x...f ..:.: ..:.;.... .. .. . . . . . .
...r-.. . ..!..:< v::,:: .:: v::.v..,:.,.,"v ,: v r:::'. {:.. v .: ?.v: ::. :. ....v... ..":.} ............. . / :.i.. . .r";:.;:v,{.. . . . . ..x'A
z - ;
s.
4 t 4
i .9
THE EARLY BIRD SUBLEASES u
Save yourself time, aggravation and $$$
SUBLEASE NOW!
The quickest and easiest way to sublet your apartment is through
The Daily's special apartment supplement to be published Sunday, Janu-
ary 30th (and distributed free on campus January 31st).
For only five dollars you can place a one-column by four-inch

i

...

CANADIAN CAMP DAYS
JAN. 18 and 19
0 DISCOVER JOB OPPORTUNITIES in Canadian Camps
r MEET CANADIAN CAMP DIRECTORS
" INFORMAL GET-TOGETHER 8:30 P.M. Tuesday evening, Jan. 18,
Room 3G, Michigan Union for color slides, camp talk and refresh-
ments.
INDIVIDUAL PERSONAL INTERVIEWS Tuesday and Wednesday,
Jan. 18 and 19 . . . for appointment see Mr. Ward Peterson, Sum-
mer Placement Office, Student Activities Building.
" MANY CAMPS REPRESENTED including general land and water
sports programs, co-ed= all boys, junior program, music and fine arts.
* GRADUATE AND UNDERGRADUATE students (at least sopho-
mores) needed to fill the following positions:

I

WOULD YOU LIKE TO READ
1000 to 2000 WORDS A MINUTE
WITH FULL COMPREHENSION & RETENTION
EASE PRESSURE - SAVE TIME - IMPROVE CONCENTRATION
You can read 150-200 pages an hour using the ACCELERATED READING method.
You'll learn to comprehend at speeds of 1,000 to 2,000 words a minute. And retention is
excellent.
This is NOT a skimming method; you definitely read every word.
You can apply the ACCELERATED READING method to textbooks and factual mate-
rial as well as to literature and fiction. The author's style is not lost when you read at these
speeds. In fact, your accuracy and enjoyment in reading will be increased.
Consider what this new reading ability will enable you to accomplish-in your required
reading and in the additional reading you want to do.
No machines, projectors, or apparatus are used in learning the ACCELERATED READ-
ING method. Thus the reader avoids developingrany dependence upon external equipment in
reading.
An afternoon class and an evening class in ACCELERATED READING will be taught
each TUESDAY adiacent to the U. of M. campus, beginning on February 15.

11

I

UI

Back to Top

© 2017 Regents of the University of Michigan