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January 15, 1966 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1966-01-15

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY. JANUARY 15.1966

PAGE TWO THE MICHIGAN DAILY SATTIRnAY. .TANTTARV 15.. i~al~

vas.. IUAI.&/L:3..ia of - 1L -a a .0, ailuv

Art Museum Exhibit Contrasts.
Works of Different Centuries

DISCUSSES STUDY-TOUR:
English Sociologist Informs
Audience of British Attitudes

Court Rules for Protestors

By FRANCIS HEYNS,
To contrast and compare the
art of one age with that of an-'
other is one of the most fascinat-
ing aspects of the history of art.
It is precisely this which thet
latest exhibit of the University.
Art Museum does,
The eight graduate students of
Charles Sawyer's seminar class in
museum study last semester have
put together a show which imag-
inatively ancd thoughtfully con-
trasts works of art of other cen-
turies with works of the twentieth
century. Each object is paired
with a modern work which re-
sembles it in several ways.
The unifying theme of the ex-
hibit is the image of man, that is,
the representation of the human

figure, as it occurs in art of
various periods and in the hands
of various artists. A standing
wooden Egyptian sculpture and a
statue by Giacometti, the well-
known Swiss sculptor, are placed
side by side. Both figures are
alert and rigid; both manifest
extreme simplification of natural
form. But there are drastic dif-
ferences in material and technique
between the two.,
Twentieth-century art is com- !
pared with Greek, Egyptian, Ro-
man and Japanese art of the
eighteenth and nineteenth cen-
turies. A drawing titled "Ma-
donna" by Edvard Munch is hung
next to a fifteenth-century stone
head of the Madonna. The sim-
ilarities between the two are ex-
traordinary, both in conception

and in execution. Both faces im-
part a haunting, disturbed quality;
Munch's Madonna is perhaps
more ideally womanly, the French
fifteenth-century head perhaps1
more poignantly capable of human
failure.
Paul Grigaut, who is the acting
director of the museum while
Sawyer is on his sabbatical, point-1
ed out that there had been an
effort to simulate "real museumt
conditions" in the creation of thet
exhibition, and that the students
had been forced to rely almost
solely on their own resources and
inventiveness. They were allowed
to choose the objects exhibited
from all of the works of art own-l
ed by the University Museum, theJ
Kelsey Museum, and the Museum1
of Anthropology.

John Vazey, distiguished Eng-
lish sociologist, addressed appli-
cants for the Interdisciplinary
Program for Study Thursday night
on the English educational track
system. Vazey, a member of the
advisory council of the new de-
partment of education in England
and a university professor, sought
to inform his audience of attitudes
they might expect to find during
their study tour of England.
Vazey asserted that the track
system, which is comparable to the
cirriculum system in American
high schools, helps serve to rein-
force England's rigid class struc-
ture. He explained that at the age
of eleven, children are separated

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DAILY, OFFICIAL BULLETIN,
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into academic or nonacademict
tracks. He emphasized the factl
that the percentage of children in
an academic track is comprised
primarily of children from pro-
fessional, white collar families.
The reason for this is primarily
the correlation of academic ability
with socio-economic class and
parental background. "The net
result," he said, "is a small uni-
versity sector which is highly
selective and broadly middle class."
Vazey compared the educational
systems problem -to that of minor-
ity group integration in the pub-
lic schools in the U.S. He argued,
"An attempt is being made in
England to increase the numbers
of working class children in the
academic stream. However, if this
is effected academic teachers of
middle-class backgrounds will be
faced withueducating pupils of
different cultural mores."
Initial plans are underway to
remedy the dichotomy in the
educational system. These include
comprehensive high schools, as
founl in America; and a compre-
hensive system at the university
level.
The lecture was part of the pro-
gram sponsored by the School of
Education, and the political
science and speech departments
for study in London of aspects of
British life. The courses offered
are Contemporary British Edu-

cation, Origins and Operations of
British Government and Rhetori-
cal Theory in Great Britain.
The program will begin in May
and last from four to six weeks. A
series of informational meetings
and discussions will be held
throughout February and March
to provide the students with an
introduction to British institutions
and thought, in preparation for
the actual visit.,

Continued from Page 1)
filing a similar suit in Washing-
ton, D.C., on behalf of Sklar be-
cause of the outcome of Miller's
suit. That suit was to be filed next
week.
Future Action
The ACLU also explained that
a key reason for the suit was to
gain admittance to the appeal
hearings which might form the
basis for future federal court ac-
tion against the Selective Service
System.
In other developments, the re-
lease of a letter from Asst. Attor-
ney General Fred M. Vinson, Jr. to
Philip Hart on the reclassifica-
tions of the Viet Nam protestors

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan, for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editor-
ial responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3519 Administration Bldg. be-
fore 2 p.m. of the day preceding
publication, and by 2 p.m. Friday
for Saturday and Sunday. General
Notices may be published a maxi-
mum of two times on request; Day
Calendar items appear once only.
Student organization notices are not"
accepted for publication.
SATURDAY, JANUARY 15
Day Calendar
Midwestern Conference on School
Vocal and Instrumental Music-Regis-
tration, Rackham Bldg., 8 a.m.
Cinema Guild-De Sica's "The Bicycle
Thief": Architecture Aud., 7 and 9
p.m.
Professional Theatre Prtgram .Per-
formance-American Conservatory The-
atre Company in Edward Albee's "Tiny
Alice": Lydia Mendelssohn ThItatre, 8
p.m.
Hockey-U-M vs. Colorado College:
Coliseum, 8 p.m.'
General Notices
Winter Term Fees: At least 50% is
due and payable on or before Jan. 31,
1966.
Non-payment of at least 50% by
Jan. 31 will result in the assessment of
a delinquent penalty of 5.
Payments may be made in person or
mailed to the Cashier's Office, 1015$
Administration Bldg., before 4:30 p.m.,
Mon., Jan. 31, 1966.
Mail Early.
Mail payments postmarked after due
date, Jan. 31, 1966, are late and sub-
ject to penalty.'
Identify mail payments as tuition
and show student number and name.
Singers Needed: (Sopranos, Altos, and
Bass) for Roselinde (Flerdermaus) 1 hr.
credit. See Josef Blatt, music director,
or come to rehearsal Mon., 7:30 p.m.,
306 Burton Tower.
The Martha Cook Bldg. is receiving
applications for fall, 1966. Present Fresh-
men and Sophomore women may apply.
Please telephone 662-3225 for an ap-
pointment.
Dante Lecture: The Dante Centen-
ary Committee presents a University
lecture, "The Significance of Dante's
'De Monadchia' in the Secularization of
Ideals," by Prof. Palmer A. Throop,
of the Dept. of History, on Mon., Jan.
17, at 4:10 p.m. in the Rackham Am-
phitheatre.
Summary of Action Taken by Student
Government Council at Its Meeting
January 13, 1966
Approved: That $60 be granted to
the Soccer Clum from the Sponsorship
Fund.
Approved: That $100 be granted the
LaCrosse Club from the Sponsorship
Fund.
Approved: That SOC contribute $250
to the Student Legal Defense Com-;
mittee.

has apparently had negligible re-
sults.
Cot. Arthur Holmes still main-
tains that the Justice Depart-
ment's opinion, which is shared by
President Johnson, according to
Press Secretary Bill Moyers, has
no impact on the reclassifications.
And an ACLU official maintained
yesterday that the statement was
carefully worded so as not to af-
fect the reclassifications.
-

Approved: That SGC send to Letters
to the Editor column of The Daily the
text of a letter distributed to the fac-
ulty by the Student Legal Defense
Committee including a statement of
SGC supports and backing of $250.
Approved: That the Student Gov-
ernment, Council Spring Elections be
held on Wed., March 28, 1966. (This is
the 12th week of classes, if the week be-
ginning January 3rd is counted as the
first, as in the Fall Election this
date falls 17 days prior to the last day
of classes.)
I Placement
PIACEMENT INTERVIEWS: Bureau
of Appointments--Seniors & grad stu-
dents, please call 764-7160 for appoint-
ments with the following:
U.S. Information Agency, Wash., D.C.
-Bi-National Center-1. Cultural Af-
fairs Officers. Extensive exper. in edu-
cation or cultural institution, possibly
ass't. prof., prof!, or chairman of dept.
Pluent knowl. of foreign lang. 2. Ass't.
Cultural Affairs Office 6. Linguists or
specialists in teaching English as for-
eign language. MA or PhD pref. 3 yrs.
Secondary or college teaching exper. 3.
Education Specialist. BS plus lang.
teaching exper. Trng. in linguistics or
teaching English as foreign lang. De-,
tails at Bureau. Note: This program
not open to BA or MA grads with no
6xper.
ANNOUNCEMENTS:
Federal Service Entrance Exam -
FSEE application deadline for exam
given on Feb. 19 is Jan. 19. This is
the last mgmt. intern exam this semes-
ter. Applications available at Bureau of
Appointments, 3200 SAB.
Univ. of South Dakota, Grad School,
Vermillion, S.D.-Fellowships & assist-
antships available for 1965-66. Grad,
study offered in 35 areas of concen-
tration. Application deadline Feb. 15.
General Services Admin., Chicago -
Announces careers in Bldg. Mgmt., Des.1
& Construction, Space Mgmt, through
Public Bldgs. Service trng. program
for grads in architect., engrg., bus.
ad., acctg., personnel mgmt. & rel. FSEE
required, except Engineers .
POSITION OPENINGS:
D. W. Zimmerman Mfg., Inc., Toledo,
Ohio-1. Sales Engr. Plant layout plus
process or methods engrg. exper. Sales
exper. helpful. Leads to District Sales
Mgr. 2. Account Specialist. Plant lay-
out plus process or methods engrg.
bkgd. Sales exper, helpful. Promote ma-
terial handling .systems package into
major account.
Centrex Corp., Findlay, Ohio-Mktg.
position for man with minimum 2 yrs.
exper. in mktg. or sales mgmt. Handle
field survey, analyze hes. rata, fore-
cast, supv. mail program ,etc.
Linde Div., Union Carbide, E. Chicago,
Ind.-Indust. Relations Supv. Immedi-
ate opening for grad in Bus. Ad. Pref.
MBA, courses in labor rel. Exper. in
trng. program desirable.
Naval Scientific & Tech. Intelligence
Center, Wash., D.C.-Various openings
in Naval Engrg. Div., responsible for
analysis, eval., & prod. of intelligence
rel. to foreign capabilities & dev. in
naval engrg. Urgent need for Naval
Architect. Also vacancies for marine
engrs. & intell. res. specialists.
City of Columbus, Ohio-Criminalist.
Degree in chem., biol., physiol., bac-
teriol., criminalistics or equiv. comb, of
trng. & exper. No exper. req. Applica-

tion deadline Jan, 21. April & June ; English, Physics, Gen. Lib. Arts. MS-
grads may apply. PhD: Info. & Controls, EM. Prof.: Ap-
* * * plied Mech., ChE; Met. BS-MS: Met.,
For further information, please call IE. BS: Sal. Engrg., E Physics. MS:
764-7460, General Div., Bureau of Ap- ChE. R. & D., Des., Engrg. Mgmt.
pointments, 3200 SAB. Carpenter Steel Co., Reading, Pa.-
BS-MS: Met. Men only. R. & D.
SUMMER PLACEMENT SERVICE: Institute for Defense Analyses, Ar-
212 SAB- lington, Va.-PhD: Aero., Comm. Sci.,
Camp Sea-Gull, Charlevois, Mich. -: EE, EM, IE, Info. & Controls, ME,
Counselors-men, waterfront director- Chem., Econ., Math, Computing. Res.
man or woman, ski instructor, truck International Nickel Co., Inc., N.Y.C.,
driver, instructor in arts & crafts, reg- Sterling Forest, N.Y.-BS: ChE, EM, E
istered nurse. Details at Summer Place- Physics, IE, Mat'is., ME, Met., Sci.
ment. Engrg. Men only. Can consider non-
citizens-for temp. practical trng.-If
ENGINEERING PLACEMENT INTER- becoming U.S. citizen-and for even-
VIEWS-Seniors & grad students, please tual placement overseas. R. & D., Sales,
sign schedule posted at 128-H West Orientation Program.
Engrg. City of Milwaukee, Wis.-BS-MS: ME.
THURS., JAN. 20- BS: CE. MS: Constr., Public Works Ad-
Chesapeake & Ohio Railway Co., Bal- min., Sanitary, Various Municipal.
timore & Ohio Railroad Co., Baltimore; Ohio Edison Co., Ohio locations -
Md. & Huntington, W. Va.-BS: CE, BS: EE, ME. Men only. Trng. Program.
EE, E Math, EM, E Physics, IE, ME. Raytheon Co., Mass., R.I. & Conn.-
Men only. Des., Trng. Any Degree: EE. BS: E Physics. BS-MS:
Bendix Products Aerospace Div., South ME. R. & D., Des.
Bend, Ind.-BS-MS: CE, IE, ME, BS: THURS.,-FRI., JAN. 20-21--
Mat'Is. Des., Des., Analysis. Bendix Radio Div., Towson, Md. -
Bendix Mishawaka Div., Mishawaka, BS-MS: EE, ME. BS: E Physics. Can
Ind.-Any Degree: EE, ME. R. & D., consider non-citizens becoming U.S.
Des. citizen. R. & D., Des., Prod.
Bendix Products Automotive Div., Bendix Research Labs., Southfield,
South Bend, Ind.-BS-MS: EE, EM, Ma- Mich.-Aiy Degree: EE, EM, ME. MS-!
terials. MS: Applied Mechanics. Any PhD: Info. & Controls, Physics, Math,
Degree: ME. BS: E Physics. Men only. Physical Chem. BS: E Physics. Can
Dev., Des. consider non-citizens if permanent resi-
Borg-Warner Corp., Marvel-Schebler dents of U.S. R. & D.
Products Div., Decatur, Ill.-BS-MS: .Bendix Systems Div., Ann Arbor -
EE, EM, ME. BS: E Math. R. & D., Des., Any Degree: EE, ME. MS-PhD: Aero.,
Prod. Comm. Sci., EM, Info. & Controls, Nu-
Cadillac Gage Co., Detroit, Warren, clear, Math, Physics. Prof.: Applied
Mich.-Any Degree: ME, Phys., Chem., Mech. R. & D., Des.
m m mm i~mm m mmmr m mmy mmmm ma mm m mmm
N ,
N 1
I I
N' TONIGHIT at 7 and 9 P.M.
1 ,
Vittorio de Sica's
N
Ii
I
I
The Bicycle Thief
N N
Winner of 12 International Awards
I f
I I
I N
I N
Rosselini's "The Chicken"
with Ing rid Bergman
I I
I N
NI1
. 1
N 1
i g
I I
N N
IN THE ARCHITECTURE AUDITORIUM
N
f ADMISSION:FIFTY CENTS
N NN
Irrrrrrrrrrr* rrrrrrrrrr rI

Across Campus
SATURDAY, JAN. 15 Company in Edward Albee's "Tiny
8 a.m.-The Midwestern Con- Alice" at the Lydia Mendelssohn
ference on School Vocal and In- Theatre.
strumenta Music will be held in 8:30 pm-Stan Getzwill pre-
the Rackham Bldg. sent a concert at Hill Aud.
10:30 a.m.-The National Coun-
cil of The Arts Seminar, with SUNDAY, JAN. 16
Gregory Peck, Elizabeth Ashley, 7 and 9 p.m.-The Cinema Guild
and Roger Stevens, will be held in will present De Sica's "The Bi-
the Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre. cycle Thief" in the Architecture
7 and 9 p.m.-The Cinema Guild Aud.
will present De Sica's "The Bi- 8 p.n.-The Professional Thea-
cycle Theif" in the Architecture tre Program will present the
Aud. American Conservatory Theatre
8 p.m.-The Professional Thea- Company in Edward Albee's "Tiny
tre Program will present the Alice" at the Lydia Mendelssohn
American Conservatory Theatre Theatre.
Ph. 483-4680 The area's Newest Drive-In is
easy to reach-2 -miles South
of Washtenow Rd. on Carpenter,
6 ' BOX OFFICE OPEN AT 6:30
Entanxce oCARPENTER ROAD
FREE ELECTRIC IN-CAR HEATERS
NOW SHOWING - ALL COLOR
WINTER BARGAIN PRICE-ADULTS $1.00
A *
AMERICAN iNERNAIOAVS COLORSCOPEPL NE F
PLANVETHE
.OVALMPIRE
~~%A1~F gtiARMB . - COLORSCOPE

1

"

DIAL 8-6416
3rd Week
(Ending Wednesday)
"WILDLY IMAGINATIVE PLOTI
FAST AND VIOLENT ACTION!
BRILLIANT GADGETRY!"
--Bosley Crowther, N.Y. Times

:.

I

It's
Murderously
Funny
F-I> ,!

I

i

DIAL 662-6264

SHOWN TODAY AT
12:15, 2:25, 4:30, 6:50 and 9:15
Shown Sunday thru Thursday at
1:30, 4:00, 6:30 and 9:05

LOOKUP! M DILOOT

p

r N_

HOOP,
ITU P
TONIGHT
U. ofM.
vs.
NORTHWESTERN
9:00 P. M.

'

HERE COMES THE BIGGEST BOND OF ALL!

J

JOSEPH E. LEVINE Production I
presents
MARCELLO MASTROIANNI
URSULA ANDRESS
M EMBASSY PICTURES Release COLOR

uDlANt UP KEVI TERENCE YOUNG RICARD MAAUM JOHN OPWS
KNM7icLdO1JACK WHITTINGHAM Ro IAN FlEN o PAA
F AB Y.U I E0VLT 0*OrN to ARTiSS ECOROL i UN
Weekday Matinees till 5 P.M.-$1 .25
Evenings & Sunday-$1.50

JOIN THE,
HEARING
SECTIQN
ON
Wnyour dia

4

O-RGANIZATION NOTICES
J :. .; 6rr," f'{ r } rrrr+R"A".. . . :.. .....:;; '"'i~"}:r"a.. %."r.
:. ......e .r .......... . ...... k.. ..... . .r .:nTr^"":::4"}:r,'"'r :". . . .v.J.,.:;. ".r

USE OF THIS COLUMN FOR AN-
NOUNCEMENTS is available to officially
recognized and registered student or
ganizations only. Organizations who are
planning to be active for the Spring
Term must be registered in the Office
of Student Organizations by Jan. 27
1966. Forms are available in Room 1011
SAB.
* * *
Lutheran Student Chapel, Worship
services, Sun., 9:30-11 a.m., Rev. Ken-
neth Ferguson, guest preacher, Hill at
Forest Ave. 7 p.m., "The Ministry of
the Church in the Inner City Situa.
tion," Rev. Ferguson, Detroit.
Gamma Delta, Sunday meeting, Jan.
16, 6 p.m., 1511 Washtenaw. Gamma
Delta, Lutheran student organiaztion,
1511 Washtenaw, program at 6:45: "Form
and Function of Modern Church Archi-
tecture," Asst. Prof. Martin Gehner of
A & D, speaker. All welcome.

Guild House, Monday noon luncheon,
Dr. Lawrence McDonald, "On Being a
Member of the John Birch Society and
a Democrat," Jan. 17, 12-1 p.m., 802
Monroe.
* *, *
U. of M. Student Religious Liberals,
Meeting (discussion), Sun., Jan. 16, 7
p.m., Unitarian Church: Dr. John
Kempf, psychiatrist, U. of M. Medical
School, "Psychological Aspects of Love."
Rides at Union and Mary Markley
Dorm, 6:45 p.m.
Inter-Quadrangle Council, Meeting
Jan. 17, Room 3529 SAB. Speaker: Dr.
Theodore M. Newcomb on Residential
College.
* * *
Newman Student Association, Ice
skating and tobogganing, Sat., Jan. 15,
8 p.m., meet at 331 Thompson.

THE ENGINEERING COUNCIL AND VULCANS
HONORARY PROUDLY PRESENT
THE BRILLIANT SOUND OF

Direct From Its Roadshow Engagement
SPECIAL POPULAR PRICES
SPECIAL SCHEDULED PERFORMANCES
Matinees: 1:15 and 3:50
Evenings: 6:30 and 9:00
Prices:
Matinees: $1.25
Nights & Sunday: $1.50
Prices This Attraction Only

li

IN CONCERT AT HILL AUDITORIUM

/1.s
y

y.
?::Mrl l

SAT., JAN. 15, 1966

8:30 P.M.

20th Century-Fox
presents

TICKETS:

$2.75, 2.25, 1.75

7"-

m

.,

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