100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 14, 1966 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-01-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY. JANUARY It. HIM

,,. TW.,E 1 H C I A N I A L YF T BVA T A I VI;I a

- ---i.- , 'f .Jn lat~wa 1,*u T ..

TINY ALICE' DISCUSSION,

1~

Panel Differs On: Albie Sybolism

TONIGHT AT8:00 P.M.I

By JOHN CRUMB, JR.
Was there any significance to
Albee's immensely emotive Work,
"Tiny Alice." This was the sub-
ject of a panel discussion held aft-
er Wednesday's ACT performance.
"The play was about God," said
Rev. James Bell of Canterbury
House. "God in the, triune char-
acters of. the Lawyer, the Butler
and Miss Alice. He's the perverse
God who talked from the masks,
who opened the" door at the top
of the stairs leading from the rep-
lica of the mansion. Like the play's
message,, you think you 'see him,
and poof . .. he isn't there. You

reach for him but grasp at only
emptiness .,.. and thiat, is ,God. .
In the end he leaves Julian alone.'
"Julian could also be a symbol
for the sacrificial lamb," ',said Prof.
Richard Burgwin of the Theatre
Arena. "Or he could. be Julian .the
Apostate."
"Symbols are set up," said Prof.
James 'Ginden of, the English ,de-
partment, "but they don't sym-
bolize what we expect thef to sym-
bolize. The symbol and the sub-
stance of the play are not the
same."
"Albee is playing on four lev-
els," said Burgwin, "that .which is
real; those fantasies that he thiniks

are real; those fantasies" that he
inpws ,are fanias sy "'and those
realities that he thinks are fan-:
tasies.
":As such, his message isn't very
profound-, and,; his symbols . lack
clarity, There> is - no surging of
coherence that will work.
"Maybe Julian is the only; real
person in.,the play . . .and what
happens could,:,all be .in. Julian's
head.".
"It is about how, a man traps:
himself by inventing things he
cannot live by," said' Grinden.
"There is always this kind .of co-
herence: . that there is no_ co-
herence. What he did, he did with

U' To Get Flint Appropriation

a brilliant virtuosity."
"It's a musical work," said pro-
ducer; Edward Hastings, "with
notes and: chords on a staff. The
playwright wrote' a treble which
winds through the fabric of the
production. He brought together
all the great issues of existence at
once (birth, death, and copulation
said, T. S. Elliot). Albee has writ-
ten strong chords to create a to-
tal, sonorous cocaphony. Some
things Jar, but they :can't help
but' to excite."
"It's like a 'great banquet at
which I am the guest," said Prof.
Frederick Wyatt, head of the' Psy-
chology Clinic. "The, atmosphere
is wonderful ,the cooking excellent,
but I'm not sure I like the man
who wrote the cookbook .. .
'"What. is missing" is any 'sort
of comprehensive 'experience. Just
feeling is not worth the expense
of production."
"Why must there bean abstract
value?", said .Prof: qrinden. ,Isn't
it~ like,, the c~ickon-egg cycle:,
which comes fiit, ,;rt or rneaftl-
ing?" ''
Discussion of Albee's play will
be continued after the ACT per-
formances on Friday night, Tues-
day 18, and Wednesday 19z. Ill"
addition to those already '.fmen..°
tioned. the panelists' will incdlud 1
Donald 'Hall.,, author of "An Eve-
mann of the philisophy depart-
ment, Prof. William Halstead, the
producer and director, and Prof.
Claribel Baird of the Theater
Area will discuss ACT productions
with the audience.

PTP
PROFESSIONAL THEATRE
PROGRAM L

p/'eeh t4

A.C.T.
AMERICAN CONSERVATORY
THEATRE

DIAL 8-6416
3rd Week
HILARIOUS SEXC
FARCE! MASTROIANNI.
IS PERFECT!"
.---Ann Guarino, N.Y. Daily News
it's
Murderously
Funy

Post-Performance
PANEL
TONIGHT!

4

'*

(Continued from Page 1)
Orlebeke continued that, if the
University and Flint community
do not seem willing to cooperate
in the plan to develop an inde-
pendent . school, the state board I
could advise the Legislature to,
withhold the money for four-year
'operation of Flint College.
No Indication
Brennan. gave no indication of
what action might be taken to
exert pressure for a settlement
along the lines discussed at
Wednesday's board meeting. Board
member Edwin Koaak, however,
has requested an informal opinion
from Attorney 'General Frank.
Kelley on the possibilities for legal
backing for the boar'd's position.
Brennan singled out Flint com-
munity leaders as the major road-
block to an amicable- settlement.
Although .he said ' he is somewhat
unhappy that the University has

not given public support 'to the
position he outlined with Romney
Wednesday, he praised University
officials. for "their good faith and
sincere efforts to .work with the
board in settling the question."
Hurt Themselves
He credited 'Flint leaders with
doing a fine job in developing the
city's present educational system,
but said they are hurting them-
selves by not cooperating" with the
board now.
In the long run, he said, setting
a precedent for acting Independ-
ently in an area that is clearly
within the board's province of
planning and coordination. will
prove as disadvantageous to Flint
as to other areas of the state.'
Flint leaders involved in the
college issue were not available for
comment last night, but Novak,
a Flint :resident as well as a board
member, said he noticed indica-
tions that the Flint community is

becoming more willing to go along
with the board's 'present stand.
Increasing Acceptance
"There appears to 'be increasing
acceptance of the inevitability of
an autonomous school replacing
"the branch in the future," he comn-
menited,, noting that a -local 'com-
mittee' dealing with' the college
problem -plans to meet shortly to
discuss the implication of Rom-
ney's recent proposals.
Novak also cited an editorial in
Wednesday's Flint Journal, which
gave serious consideration to the.
possibility '-of' an' auto nmous
school beig' established. The
paper has heretofore opposed any-
thing but indefinite continuation'
of the University branch.

EDWARD ALBEE'S CONTROVERSIAL
NEW DRAMATIC HIT
Under the direction of William Ball

MENDELSSOHN THEATRE

JAN. 11--JAN. 23

. '3NON-SUBSCRIPTION PERFORMANCES r.,
FRI., JAN. 21 GOOD SEATS AT BOX OFFICE

SUN., JAN. 23

PHONE 668-6300

U

ow

JOSEPH E. LEVINE Production
MARCELLO MASTROIANNI:t
URSULA ANORESS
to EMSASy PICTURES We*" . COLOR

Ph. 483-46MO

The area's Newest Drive-in is
easy to reach-2.miles South
of Washtenow Rd..on Carpenter.

BOX OFFICE OPEN AT 6:30

1

Subscribe. to The Michigan Daily.

r

I-

ULLR SKI CLUB
A li-Campus

..

FREE ELECTRIC IN-CAR HEATERS
NOW SHOWING -- ALL COLOR
WINTER'BARGAIN PRICE-ADULTS $1.00
AMRIA ITRNTONLS , wCOLBRSCOPE /PoAf ET .
t+Uhs(8 Di' VMPIRES
. CLORC0P

ml

I,

PT PA§~A7

PT PP-crA/7

I

I

If

S KI,
MT. HOLLY
FRI., JAN. 14
7:00-1 2:30 P.M.

iTE

MEET UNION SIDE
50c bus transportation
$1 .50 tow, $2.00 rental

NJ

Ifoip

Direct From Its Roadshow. Engagement
SPECIAL POPULAR PRICES
SPECIAL SCHEDULED PERFORMANCES
'Matinees: 1 :15and.3 :50
Evenings: 6:30 and 9:00
Prices:
2~ Matinees: $1 .25
N ights &-Sunday: $1.50 /.~

I

~mmmmmmi~mmmmmmm~rma r rs1rmmmmmrsmmmmrm mm= mm mo
.TONIGHT' at 7"fnd 9 P.M.
TA \O S I
Iy a I_. -a
:ES PICURE
VEIC FIM ETIA
SHORTS
ADVEICEON FIMFETSVALS
rSHR TS: 'Ir~rrwrrs~wr~r~rr M~a

q' .1f- '

AV..Exemrj F~rr
,ClrTUR E ,' -ZJEONSTA7ON A

o ~fervrz vroz2;erI'/t zM//
/ER TRLT FOUAv22AT/Of Il 71?-'7A9 f dl obA
YVILLIAM ,84LL * GENERAL DIRECTOR WIlfttM 13AL, GENERAL DIRECTOR
ARTHUR~ PATPICIf\ IWt
MICU Ek LATE *

ALL. $EATSI
Z.50

oas-erv'd of
WJIAM GALL, GENERAL -"tRI TOR
WLAE
4y SAUEL A6CKE?7
W~AITItIG FOL GDOT
All SEATS i25o
TAN.M
11o00PM
TIEATRE,

u p .

'o0

I

IEXTRA BONIUSJ
PE RVORHANCE/
J7AN. 241- 40PM.
MVMDE.L~SOHN 1TH[ATRE
All SEATS 4 1.50

r

J"A. Z,U" 1100 PM.
M it[iEIN TULATRE

,* A"""~" ~ tOth Centufy-Fea
presents -
NO W_

6

COLOR BY DE
CINEMASC{
DIAL
5-629C

omwoommom

DIAL 662-6264,

Shown Today and. Saturday
12:15; 2:25, 4:30, 6:50 and,
Shown Sunday thru Thursdcj
1 :30, 4:00, 6:30 and 9:(

LOoKP! qK I LOOKOU0

4

6N"

E UXE
1,9.:15.,,
y ttr"

N

THE ENGINEERING COUNCIL AND VULCANS
HONORARY PROUDLY PRESENT
THE BRILLIANT SOUND OF'

F

T.
° ; s
.
z
, L,
y - - :

I

!_

NEE tCOMES THE BIGGEST BAND OF ALL!

IN CONCERT AT HILL AUDITORIUM

SAT'., JAN. 15, 1966

8:30 P.M.

TICKETS:

$2.75, 2.25,

1.75

ALBER RB ova~ ' L aIvIV

3>I

..^ " - e. f - r. t r. , . i f 1 T n A a 1an

E

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan