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April 15, 1966 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-04-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

FRIDAY, APRIL 15, 1866

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE IF

I

FRIDAY. APRIL 15, 1 9 6 6 TIlE MICHIGAN DAILY PA4~ I

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Need To Expand Health Service

Students Receive Meal Refunds

(Continued from Page 1)
change after the first reading. Al-
though he felt Health Service "had
not really suffered because of lack
of facilities, it would be helpful
to have more space."
Another student went to Health
Service with flu symtoms, only to
be told she had three major di-
seases-tuberculosis, diabetes, and
pneumonia. She recalled, "They
scared the hell out of me." After'
staying in the infirmary, she went
to University Hospital, only to find
the diagnosis was incorrect.
Commenting on student com-
plaints Beckett suggested that
"students do not realize- that pre-
liminary diagnosis differs from the
final one. Many students, he con-
tinued, misunderstand when they
read their records."
Complaints 'Popular'
A doctor working at 'Health
Service think it is "popular to
complaint about Health Service. I
even did when I was in college.
Although relations could be im-
proved, perfection is unattain-
able."
The OSA study shows that both
an increase in the size of the staff
and available space must be pro-
vided to maintain adequate serv-
ices. Prior to these findings, Health
Service has attempted to utilize
all, its space in anticipation of
enrollment increases. For example,
three physician's offices with ex-
amining rooms were constructed
out of an old conference room.
The Report-of University Health
Service, 1963-1964, predicted that
these additional offices, "will serve
our needs until 1968. No other
space is now available in the
Health Service for expansion."
Unprecedented Move
All the units of the OSA were

requested by Vice-President for
Student Affairs Richard Cutler ins
an unprecedented move to under-c
take a long range study. Cutler
hoped that these studies wouldF
enable the University to stay
ahead of future needs of the stu-e
dent body. Health Service is one
of the nine units responsible to
Cutler, and offers services free ofE
charge.f
Responsibilities include health
care of students, complete periodic1
faculty examinations, food han-1
dler examinations, radiation con-1
trol examinations, and general en-
vironmental health and safety.
Cutler says Health Service is1
"operating under trying circum-1
stances by being clearly in needf
for more space and understaffed."
The studies made, he feels, will,
lead to the recognition of these,
problems to persuade those who
hold the pursestrings. Meanwhile,
Health Service is doing well with
its limited resources to keep facili-
ties adequate."
Ten Doctors
Ten full time doctors work in
the medical clinic where incoming
patients first go. If more special-1
ized care is required, the patient.
is referred to the other units of
Health Service or the hospital. An
eleventh position is filled by a
resident doctor who is on a month
vacation from University Hospital.
During the busy season about 250-
300 patients a day go through the
medical clinic.
Dr. John Wyman, director of the
medical clinic, says "ideally we
could use several more staff, since
for every 1500 students there
should be one doctor. But the
problem of staff and space short-
age is found in all health services."

Health Service includes more
specialized units than the medical
clinic, such as dentistry. The unit
is used only for emergency cases
and requires appointments. If this
clinic could meet all student needs,
100 more dentists would be need-
ed, notes Beckett.
Several alternate plans were
suggested in the request to Cutler
for the future needs of Health
Service. Beckett said "either a new
building or branch,on North Cam-
pus will be built or units in the
present structure will be moved to
University Hospital. Our relations
with the hospital are excellent, in-
cluding patient referrals and doc-
tor exchanges. A committee should
be formed to study the needs in
further detail."
This committee, according to
John Feldkamp, assistant to the
vice-president for student affairs,
"should be set up in the near fu-
ture, and should include student
representation."
Student participiation in deter-
mining the needs of Health Service
is important, because eligibility for
Health Service privileges includes
any student regulatrly enrolled in
the University when he is in the
Ann Arbor area.

By LUCY KENNEDY
The University has recently made
exceptions to its policy of giving
no refunds for meals that students
regularly miss.
Students with classes at North
Campus conflicting with meal
hours or who cannot eat dorm
food for religious reasons are be-
ing given refunds, according to
Leonard Schaadt, business mana-
ger of residence halls.
Students, however, who miss
meals due to a job outside the
residence halls have been unable
to obtain refunds from the Uni-
versity.
Schaadt explained that Univer-
sity policy has been to make re-
funds only in the case of North
Campus students or students who
can eat only kosher food.
Present rates are based on esti-
mated 25 per cent absentee rate in
all dorms for all meals and trans-
fer of meal tickets or refunds for
meals m-issed would necessitate an
increase in rates. The bonds is-
sued to finance residence halls
also stipulate that students are to
eat meals in the dorms.
Exceptions to this policy of non-
refunds have been made only be-
cause some students cannot get
back from North Campus in time

for meals at the residence halls.
Similarly, allowances for Ortho-
dox Jews provide only for a re-
fund on meals eaten at the Hillel
Foundation.
Other housing units on cam-
pus make approximately the same
provisions for Orthodox Jews and
North Campus students, but also
give added benefits to those in-
dividuals consistently absent from

student in the house who has a
dormitory meal job. Students liv-
ing in co-ops regularly missing
meals can bring the problem be-
fore their house, and if the house
has enough money at the time,
they will reduce the student's bill
in proportion to the meals he is
missing.
A typical problem for the stu-
dent living in the residence halls
is the restaurant job. In many
cases the student is given a meal
at the restaurant which is con-
sidered part of his wages. If he is
also paying full room and board he
is paying for a meal he does not
eat which cuts out part of the
profit he makes from the job.

FRIDAY, and SATURDAY
are SOLD OUT
But you can still get great seats to
O KISS ME, KATE
Sunday night (7:00) .,.$1.75
LYDIA MENDELSSOHN THEATRE
Box office (NO 8-6300) now open!

meals.
One fraternity,
gives a reduction

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You? It's very early, we
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NO 8-6779 Ann Arbor

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