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April 12, 1966 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-04-12

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TUESDAY, APRIL 12, 1966'

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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TUESDAY, APRIL 12, 1968 THE MICHIGAN DAILY A £~~ABI 05. V NeLl

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Twins Defend Title

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Fight

for

Flags.

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NEW STYLES FIRST AT WILD'S

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{NL Race Wide Open

By The Associated Press
The Minnesota Twins open de-
fense of their league crowns to-
day as the big league season gets
rolling with an eight-game pro-
gram following yesterday's opener
at Washington.
Professional'. oddsmakers split
their votes between the Twins and
the Baltimore Orioles as winners
in the American League pennant
race.
Opening day opposition for the
champion Twins is provided by
the erstwhile lowly Kansas Ath-
letics at Minnesota's Metropolitan
Stadium. The caliber of their op-
ponent doesn't keep the Twins
from approaching the '66 debut
with crusade-like fervent.
"We know that the best thing
for us to do is to step out front
early and stay there," explained
Manager Sam Mele. "We have the
winning habit and we hope to
repeat."
The New York Yankees, who
hope to make people forget their
4 sixth-place finish of 1965. host
the contending Detroit Tigers. The.
Yanks are cheered by Mickey,
Mantle's return to the starting
lineup after a long period of re-
covery from surgery on his right
shoulder.
Johnny Keane, Yankee manager,
said of his opposition, "Detroit
seems to have the best lineup of
everyday players with a strong-
armed pitching staff."
League Lineups
Kansas City Hunter (8-8) at Min-
nesota Grant (21-7) or Pascual (9-3)
2:30 p.m., 27,000.
Detroit Lolich (15-9) at New York'
Ford (16-13), 2 p.m., 35,000.1
Baltimore Barber (15-10) at Boston
Wilson (13-14), 1:30 p.m., 15,000.
California Chance (15-10) at Chi-
cago John (14-7), 2:15 p.m.,)25,000.
Only games scheduled.

Tiger Manager Charlie Dressen
reported, "I feel five or six teams
will be in it and I am confident
that the Tigers will be one."
Baltimore Orioles, strengthened
by the addition of slugging Frank
Robinson in an off-season trade,
open against the Boston Red Sox
in Boston. Oriole manager Hank
Bauer predicted, "I see it as a
team fight to the wire. In the top
five you've got Chicago, Detroit,
Cleveland, Minnesota and us."
Eddy Stanky's Chicago White
Sox, the champs of the spring
training season, open against the
California Angels in Comiskey
Park. Stanky commented, " I 'do
think we have an outstanding
chance. Our team will rise and fall
with its pitching."

By The Associated Press
The Los Angeles Dodgers, who
are hesitatingly picked to repeat
as National League champs, will
battle the Houston Astros today at
Chavez Ravine. The season could
be a long one for the Dodgers since
most oddsmakers see the race de-
veloping into a wide-open affair
with the San Francisco Giants, At-
lanta Braves and Cincinnati Reds
contending for the pennant.
The World Champion Dodgers
will have Sandy Koufax and Don
Drysdale sitting on the bench as
they make their season debut.
Dodger manager Walt Alston does
not feel that either pitcher is
ready to start.
He commented,. "I look for a
very close race, I have to be op-
timistic. We aren't worried about
Koufax' elbow like we were last
season..
Leo Durocher, Chicago Cub men-
tor, returns to the game after a
ten-year absence wheni the Cubs
take on the San Francisco Giants
in Candlestick Park. Giant mana-
ger Herman Franks remarked, "I,
expect .our Giants to be knocking
on the pennant door. Look for the
Cubs to move up a notch or two
this year under that new manager
they've got.."

MudCat Grant and Sam Mle

The new-look St. Louis Cardin-
als get their youth movement un-
derway in Busch Stadium against
the Philadelphia Phillies. The
Cards were the hottest team in
spring training, winning 18 and
losing 9, and capturing 15 of their
last 18 exhibition games. But they
aren't rated a contender because
of inexperience and question
marks caused by trades.
Phillie manager Gene Mauch is
sending ex-Cardinals Dick Groat
and Bill White against their old
mates.
A capacity crowd at Atlanta is
expected to turn out to watch the
Braves take on the Pittsburgh
Pirates. By coincidence a decision
is expected to be handed down in
Wisconsin's anti-trust suit against
baseball today. The transplanted
Braves are co-defendants in the
suit with the National League.
League Linieups
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Houston Roberts (5-2) at Los An-
geles Osteen (15-15), 11 p.m., 35,-
000.
Chicago Jackson (14-21) at San
Fracisco Marichal (22-13), 4 p.m., 42,-
500.t
Pittsburgh Veale (17-12) at Atlan-
ta=Cloninger (24-11), 8:05 p.m., 50,-
983.
Philadelphia Bunning (19-9) at St.
Louis Gibson (20-12), 9 p.m., 24,000.
New York Fisher (8-24) at Cincin-
nati Pappas (13-9), 2:30 p.m., 30,000.

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REDS, METS CANCELLED:
Indians Down Senators, 5-2,

By The Associated Press
WASHINGTON-Sam McDowell
struck out nine men as Cleveland
rallied with four runs in the
ninth inning and beat Washington
ninth inning and beat Washing-
ton 5-2 in the American League
baseball opener yesterday before a
record first-day crowd of 44,468.
including Vice-President Hubert
Humphrey.
Frank Howard's two-run homer
in the sixth inning had given Pete
Richert a 2-1 edge but the In-,
dians came back in the ninth and
won with the help of a pair of
two-run singles by Vic Davalillo
and Max Alvis..
The vice-president, subbing for
President Johnson as the man to

SPORT SHORTS:
Nicklaus Rallies in Playoff
To Capture Masters Again

throw out the first pitch, leaped
to his feet and cheered when
Howard's smash hit the left field
foul line marker, about 25 feet
above the ground and only fair
by some eight inches. Ken Mc-
Mullen, who had singled, scored
ahead of him.
But the Indians smashed back
with one out in the ninth.
Larry Brown walked and Dick
Howser ran for him. Jim Landis'
pinch double, then a walk tc
pinch hitter by Chico Salmon off
relief pitcher Ron Kline, loaded
the bases. Davalillo's single scored
Howser, and Alvis and both Sal-
mon and Davalillo moved up on
an error. Alvis then hit his two-
run single.
Cleveland 001 000 004-5 11 1
Washington 000 002 000-2 4 1
McDowell, Siebert (9) and Cran-
dall, Azcue (9); Richert, Kline (9),
McCormick (9) and Camilli. W-Mc-
iioweli (1-0). L;-Richert (9-1).
HomeRun-Washington, Howard,
CINCINNATI -A steady rain
that started about noon washed
out Cincinnati's 1966 National
League baseball opener against
the New York Mets yesterday,
marking the first time since 1913
that the Reds have had to post-
pone a season opener.
The game immediately was re-
scheduled for 1:30 p.m. (EST) to-
day, an open date for both clubs.
The weatherman had forecast
the rain but hardy fans, accustom-
ed to Cincinnati phenomenal.

Comparison of Contenders

FINAL 1965
AMERICAN LEAGUE
W L Pct.. GB'
Minnesota 102 60 .630 -
Chicago 95 67 .586 7
Baltimore 94 68 .580 8
Detroit 89 73 .549 13
Cleveland 87 75 .537 15
New York 77 85 .475 25
California 75 87 .463 27'
Washington 70 92 .432 22
Boston 62 100 .383 40
Kansas City 59 103 .364 43

St. Lou
New Yo
San Fra
Houston
Atlanta
Pittsbu:
Chicago
Los Ang
Philade
Cincinn

SPRING 1966
NATIONAL LEAGUE
js 18
ark 141
ancisco 151
1 141
131
rgh 131
13 1
geles 101
lphia 101
ati 102

L
9
10
11
14
13
13
14
16
16
20

Pet.
.667
.583
.577
.500
.500
.500
.481
.385
.385
.333
Pect.
.750
.607
.577
.538
.536
.536
.520
.407
.320
.296

weather luck, had Crosley Field
well more than half-filled by the
time the game was called at 3:30.
Many others were in the run-
ways under the stands.

Los An
San Fra
Pittsbur
Cinc inna
Milwauk
Philadel
St. Lou
Chicago
Houston
New Yor

NATIONAL LEAGUE
W L Pc
geles 97 65 .5
ancisco 95 67 .5
gh 90 72 .5:
iati 89 73 .5
Kee 86 76 .5
phia 85 76 .5
[k 80 81 .4
72 90 .4S
65 97 .4
rk 50 112 .3(

et. GB
599-
586 2
.56 7
549 8
531 11
28 11Y2
197 16Y2
[44 25
101 32
[09 47

AMERICAN LEAGUE
W L
Chicago 21 7
New York 17 11
Baltimore 15 11
Kansas City 14'12
California 15 13
Minnesota 15. 13
Detroit 13 12
Cleveland 11 16
Washington 8 17
Boston 8 19

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By The Associated Press
AUGUSTA-Thunderclap drives
and two mighty putts gave Jack
Nicklaus an easy playoff victory
over . Tommy Jacobs and Gay
Brewer, Jr., last night and made
him the first man in history to
win two Masters golf titles in a
row.
The golfing Goliath from Co-
lumbus, who rallied on the final
holes to tie for first place Sunday
at a 288, unleashed a two-under-
par 70 that beat Jacobs by two
shots and the glassy-eyed Brewer
by eight. Jacobs shot par 72, and
Brewer 78.
The handsome, 31-year-old Ja-
cobs, a pro for 10 years, started
,with a 35-foot birdie putt on the
first hole and stayed with Nick-
laus-almost shot for shot -
through nine. Then, inch by inch,
he had to bow before the strong
onslaught of the driving Nicklaus.
The shell-shocked Brewer, ap-
parently still amazed by his three-
putt on the 72nd green Sunday
that robbed him of a clear-cut
title, never mustered a serious
challenge.
Big Three
Nicklaus, in winning ,thus pre-
served the modern day domina-
tion of the Big Three-Nicklaus,
Arnold Palmer and Gary Player-
who now have won this tourna-
ment eight times in a row.
Palmer, the heavy advance fav-
orite, tied with Doug Sanders for
fourth at 290 and Player, off his
game, finished well back at 299.
Nicklaus started the tournament
with a 68, then fell back to a 76
and a pair of 72's in this strange
event which \saw players blowing
lr. the title rather than winning it.
The 288 score was the second
highest ever for a winner.
Nicklaus went to the front for
the first time at the 10th when Ja-
cobs bogeyed again with a weak
chip. From then on Nicklaus was
rarely in serious trouble.
Jack increased h7is advantage to
two strokes at the 11th-a lead
he never lost-when he rolled in
a downhill putt of 25 feet.
NBA All-Star Team
NEW YORK-Wilt Chamberlain
of the Philadelphia 76ers, the
league's Most Valuable Player, and
Rick Barry of the San Francisco
Warriors, the Rookie of the eYar,
were named yesterday on the 1966
National Basketball Association
All-Star team.
Three repeaters from 1965, Os-
car Robertson and Jerry Lucas of
the Cincinnati Royals and Jerry
West of the Los Angeles Lakers,
rounded out the first team picked
by a vote of 86 sports writers and

sportscasters in the nine NBA ci-
ties.
Three Boston Celtics, Bill Rus-
sell, John Havlicek and Sam Jones,
were named to a second team
along with Hal Greer of Phila-
delphia and Gus Johnson of the
Baltimore Bullets.
Those chosen on the first team
each will receive $200. The sec-
ond team players get $100 each.
None of the players received a
perfect score of 9.000 in the vot-
ing, in which each league city was
accorded a full vote to equalize
the balloting.
Robertson came closest to a per-
feet score with 8.916. He missed
by one individual vote of the 86
cast.

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(By the authorof "RallyRound theFlag,Boy
"Dobie Gillis,"e.)
ROOMMATES REVISITED
This morning's mail brought a letter from a student at
a prominent Western university (Princeton). "Dear Sir,"
he writes. "In a recent column you said it was possible to
get along with your roommate if you try hard enough.
Well, I'd like to see anyone get along with my roommates
Mervis Trunz (for that is his name) practices the ocarina
all night long, keeps an alligator, wears knee-cymbals, and
collects airplane tires. I have tried everything I can with
Mervis Trunz, but nothing works. I am desperate. (signed)
Desperate."
Have you, dear Desperate, really tried everything? Have
you, for example, tried a measure so simple, so obvious,
that it is easy to overlook? I mean, of course, have you of-
fered to share your PersonnaO Super Stainless Steel Blades
with Mervis Trunz?
To have a friend, dear Desperate, you must be a friend.
And what could be more friendly than sharing the bounty
of Personna Super Stainless Steel Blades? Who, upon en-
joying the luxury of Personna, the nickless, scrapeless, tug-
less, hackless, scratchless, matchless comfort of Personna,
the' ease and breeze, the power and glory, the truth and
beauty of Personna-who, I say, after such jollies could
harden his heart against his neighbor? Nobody, that's who
-not even Mervis Trunz-especially not today with the
new Personna Super Blade bringing us new highs in speed,
comfort, and durability. And here is still a further bonus:
Personna is available both in Double Edge style and Injec-,
tor style.

SPORTS NIGHT EDITOR:
HOWARD KOHN

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No, dear Desperate, your problem with Mervis Trunz is
far from insoluble. In fact, as roommate problems go, it is
pretty small potatoes. Compare it, for example, to the clas-
sic case of Basil Metabolism and E. Pluribus Ewbank.
Basil and E. Pluribus, roommates at a prominent East-
ern university (Oregon) were at an impassable impasse.
Basil could study only late at night, and E. Pluribus could
not stay awake past nine p.m. If Basil kept the lights on,
the room was too bright for E. Pluribus to sleep. If E. Pluri-
bus turned the lights off, the room was too dark for Basil
to study. What to do?
Well sir, these two intelligent American kids found an
answer. They got a miner's cap for Basil! Thus, he had
enough light to study by, and still the room was dark
enough for E. Pluribus to sleep.
It must be admitted, however, that this ingenious solu-
tion had some unexpected sequelae. Basil got so enchanted
with his miner's cap that he switched his major from 18th
Century poetry to mining and metallurgy. Shortly after
graduation he had what appeared to be a great stroke of
luck: while out prospecting, he discovered what is without
question the world's largest feldspar mine. This might have
made Basil very rich except that nobody, alas, has yet dis-
covered a use for feldspar. Today Basil, a broken man,
squeezes out a meagre living as a stalagmite in Ausable
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Nor has E. Pluribus fared conspicuously better. Once
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