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April 10, 1966 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-04-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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SUNDAY, APRIL 10, 1966

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

..D Y A R L 1 , 9 6T H I H G A A L

£t'AB 'ZSJVLXN

Scrimmage Shows

Two-Way

Power

SPORTS SHORTS:
Trackmen Nab Four Firsts

By JOHN SUTKUS
It .was a cold, gray day, the kind
you expect in the fall. There was
even a football game going on
down at Ferry Field.
But these symptoms of fall were
only fooling. Actually it is still
sprung in Ann Arbor. The calendar
is still right.
The football game was only a
spring, scrimmage, another part
in the grind that makes up spring
football drills. It made up the last
get-together of this type before
next week's extravaganza over at
the stadium.
Squads were again divided into
blue and white teams, with blue
taking offense and white assuming
defensive chores. The scrimmage
started with the, second-string of-
fensive unit matched against the
first-string defensive gang.
The first play from scrimmage
was nothing to write home to
mother about, but the second was

something else again. Stan Kemp,
punting specialist last year but
playing offensive end this spring,
caught the secondary flatfooted
on the right side. Breaking into
the open, he grabbed a perfectly-
timed pass from quarterback John
Thomas and outsprinted the de-
fensive halfbacks for a 70-yard
touchdown.
But the whites settled down and
put the clamps on. Except for a
first down pass from Thomas to
Derrick Humphries, the second-
stringers were stifled for the rest
of their opening stay.
When the first-string offense
took over against the second de-
fensive team, the results were
hardly different. Later in the
day, though, the offensive units
moved well and put on a good
show for the frozen football fans
who stayed around long enough to
see it.
"I'd rate the two teams (blue

and white) about equal," conclud-
ed Coach Bump Elliott. "We'll have
to work on polishing a few things
up next week."
Next week is the final week of
spring drills. The wrap-up to the
spring season will be a full-blown
scrimmage at Michigan Stadium.
"It will be just like a game,"
promised Elliott.
Yesterday's affair showed some
powerful defense, then some pow-
erful offense.
After the quick touchdown, the
first team whites got the "Okla-
homa" defense rolling and shut
the second blue team off. Quar-
terback Thomas was caught be-
hind the line of scrimmage several
times and the passing attack
faltered.
Thomas Doane added to the
blue's humiliation by making a
heads-up interception of a Thomas
aerial deflected at the line of
scrimmage. Doane turned out to

be one of the leading pass receiv-
ers for the day when he inter-
cepted two more errant passes
later in the day. "He's coming
along," says Elliott.
The first-team offense, sporting
Dick Vidmer, Jack Clancy, Dave
Fisher, Ernie Sharpe, and com-
pany, found the going rough in its
first crack at the second white
team. The blues were unable to
move the ball well until after
they had been acclimated to the
game for awhile.
Then a beautifully executed 30-
yard roll-out pass play from Vid-
mer to end Clayt Wilhite got them
rolling. A couple of arm fakes by
Vidmer drew the secondary up
long enough for Wilhite to take
the pass and get a start toward
the goal line. Fisher eventually
scored the TD on a short run.
But for the most part it was a
day for the running game. A
combination of the cold weather
and a brisk wind made it tough
on the hands. Some passes were
dropped, some underthrown.
The second blue team returned
to the fray and began to move the
ball with a running attack. Ted
Jobe took a pitchout and whipped
around end on a 34-yard jaunt
before he was brought down. A
few plays later, halfback Ron
Johnson stepped off a 13-yard run.
Quarterback Thomas threw in a
pass play for a 22-yard gain and

DAVE FISHER

Special To The Daily
LEXINGTON - Michigan's
trackmen brought home their
share of the hardware from the
Kentucky Relays yesterday by
capturing four firsts. The Wolver-
ines walked off with a total of
ten' medals as two relay teams
and two individuals won their
events.
The four-mile relay team, con-
sisting of Ken Coffin, Jim Dennis,
Ted Benedict, and Brian Kelly,
captured its race in the time of
17:07.5, a meet record. The Uni-
versity of Tennessee finished sec-
ond.
Elmo Morales, Cecil Norde, Jim
Mercer, and Alex McDonald, the
members of the two-mile relay
team, were clocked in 7:34.4 in
winning their event. McDonald
put in a finishing stint of 1:52.6
to clinch the race.
Jack Harveycracked the meet
record in the shot put by heaving
the iron 57' 101y2" to win the ev-
ent, held on Friday.
Ron Kutchinski, a freshman,
raced to the 660-yard title in a
time of 1:17.5, a new meet record.
In Friday's preliminaries Kutch-
inski qualified with a clocking of
1:18.9, which also cracked the
meet record.
Tom Kearney, another fresh-
man, placed third in the open one-
mile.
The mile relay team placed 4th.
The 440-yard relay team had
captured second, but was disqual-
ified for running out of lane.
* * *
Caz Big Ten MVP
CHICAGO (P) - Cazzie Russell
of Michigan was named the Big
Ten's most valuable basketball

player yesterday for the second'
consecutive year.
Russell beat out nine other play-
ers - one from each conference
team-all of whom had been se-
lected by their teammates.
A 23-man panel including con-
ference coaches and veteran offi-
cials chose the All-America on a
basis of two points for first place
and one for second.
For the second straight year
Russell will receive the silver bas-
ketball awarded annually by the'
Chicago Tribune.
When Russell won last year, he
became the first Michigan player
to do so since the award was first
made in 1946.
* * *
AAU Swims
BRANDON, Fla. (/) - Michael
Burton, a UCLA freshman, set a
record of 1,650 yards yesterday at
the closing of the National AAU
Men's Swimming and Diving
Championships.
Burtonputaa 16:27.3 time into
the books beating the old mark
SCORES
EXHIBITION BASEBALL
Pittsburgh 15, Philadelphia 7
Washington 4, Boston 2
Baltimore 2, New York (N) 1
Chicago (A) 5, Cincinnati 1
St. Louis 2, Kansas City 1
Houston 3, Detroit 1
Chicago (N) 5, Tacoma (PCL) 0
San Francisco 9, California 3
New York (A) 2, Atlanta 1
Minnesota 7, Houston 6
NHL
Stanley Cup Playoff
Montreal 2, Toronto 9 (Montreal
takes 2-0 lead In the best-of-seven
series)
NBA
Western Division Finals
Los Angeles 107, St. Louis 95 (Los
Angeles leads best-of-seven series
3-1)

by more than 12 seconds on
cold, damp day that did not en-
courage spectacular performances.
Roy Saari, who finished second
in 16:41.5, had previously held
the record of 16:39.9, posted in
the 1965 NCAA championships.
The record was one of three
established in the three-day event.
Yale's varsity, anchored by the
Olympic star Don Schollander, set
a new record in the 800 freestyle
with a time of 7:04.1 to close the
competition.
Second place Santa Clara, with
Buckingham a key member, also
was under the record set by Mich-
igan in the recent NCAA cham-
pionships with a 7:05.8. ,
Michigan star Bruce Brown fin-
ished fourth in the 10-meter div-
ing, while Les Brisbee, another
Wolverine, placed sixth in the
100-meter butterfly.

PLAYOFF ACTION:
Montreal Skates by Toronto,
Lakers Crush Hapless'Hawks

By The Associated Press
MONTREAL - Third period
goals by Claude Provost and Bob-
by Rousseau broke up a shutout
duel and gave the Montreal Can-
adiens a 2-0 victory over the To-
ronto Maple Leafs in the second
game of their Stanley Cup playoff
semifinal Saturday night.
The triumph gave Montreal a
2-0 lead in the best-of-seven ser-
les with the third game scheduled
for Tuesday at Toronto.
The game was scoreless until
midway through the final period
when Provost finally beat Toronto
goalie Terry Sawchuck on a short
drive from the right side.
Until that goal, Sawchuck and
Montreal goalie Gump Worsley
had dominated play in the pen-
alty-filled game.
Less than seven minutes after
Provost, put the Canadiens on
Game, Called
The Michigan baseball team
went to bat against Mother
Nature over the weekend and the
venerable old lady proved much
too overpowering as the Wolver-
ines went down on three called
'4 strikes.
Mother Nature's first pitch
struck on Friday as the Maize and
Blue were forced to cancel their
home opener against the Univer-
sity of Detroit because of wet
grounds and cold weather.
Yesterday, the Wolverines had
hoped to get in some swings
against the freshman squad in a
planned doubleheader. Instead,
Michigan was forced to take two
more called strikes thrown from
Mother Nature. All three weekend
games,were cancelled because of
the bad weather.
Coach MotY-Benedict noted af-
ter the twinbill had been scrubbed
that "we'll try to go again on
Monday at 3:30 (in a single game
against the frosh). It all depends
of course on the weather."

top, Rousseau provided the insur-
ance goal when he whipped Ralph
Backstrom's rebound past Saw-
chuck.
Worsley, winner of the Vezina
Trophy during the regular season
for allowing the fewest number
of goals, finished with 25 saves to
38 for Sawchuck.
Frank Mahovlich was sitting out
a delayed penalty when Provost
converted a pass from J. C. Trem-
blay and Gilles Tremblay for the
winning goal. The penalty was one
of 26 handed out by Referee Bill
Friday. The total was five short
of the Stanley Cup oue-game rec-
ord.
Friday, who whistied down 13
infractions in the first 20 min-
utes, called a total of 22 minors,
two majors and two misconducts
in the hard-hitting, close checking
game.
The Leafs, with assistant coach
King Clancy running the club in
place of flu-stricken Punch Im-
lach, spent most of the first per-
iod checking the Canadiens and
had trouble formulating an at-
tack.
Toronto managed just. three

shots at Worsley in the opening
20 minutes. Play was less than
precise in the first two periods
and tempers grew short on several
occasions.
* * *
ST. LOUIS - Darrell Imhoff
joined old reliables Jerry West
and Elgin Baylor in a final half
Los Angeles spurt that crushed the
St. Louis Hawks, 107-95, Saturday
night in the Western Division
playoff final of the National Bas-
ketball Association.
The victory gave the Lakers a
3-1 advantage in the best-of-seven
series aas the teams moved to Los
Angeles tomorrow night for the
fifth contest.
West, who finished with 42
points, kept the Lakers in the
game with 22 markers in the first
half, which ended with St. Louis
leading 51-47. Then Imhoff enter-
ed the game and Baylor, who man-
aged only seven points in the first
half, began hitting.
Baylor finished with 26 points+
Walt Hazzard had 15. Zelmo Bea-
ty led the Hawks' attack with 22.
He was followed by Cliff Hagan's
19 and Bill Bridges' 17.

Royce Spencer moved the pigskin
to a first down on the 15.
With fourth down and only a
foot, fullback Tim Radigan bulled
to the four to set, up first down
and goal. Halfback Johnson,
though swarmed under by three
white shirts at the goal line, still
managed to score on the first play.
The first team blues, not to be
outdone, marched in and promptly
launched Fisher on a 66-yard TD
jaunt. The big fullback took a
pitchout from Vidmer and found
plenty of room to the right.
The first team continued to
move the ball for the rest of its
stay, though a 35-yard run by Vid-
mer and a 19-yard touchdown by
George Hoey were called back be-
cause of penalties.
The third team units scrimmag-
ed each other for the last half
hour.
The leading pass receivers for
the day were Kemp, Clancy, and
the Wilhite brothers, Clayte and
Jim. Kemp originally started with
the second unit, but moved up to
the first when Clancy left with a
cut on the chin.
Rocky Rosema sat out the day
with a wrist injury.
The scrimmage ended with a
flourish when Doane intercepted
his third pass. Then all the players
swarmed on the field and it was
over.
Just one more week left.

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Phone UN 4-4220

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NEJAC TV RENTALS
662-4571
PATRICK WATSON of
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P.M.-April 11
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