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April 10, 1966 - Image 6

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-04-10

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PAGE SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, APRIL 10, 1966

PAGE SIX THE MICHIGAN DAILY SUNDAY. APRIL 10, 1960

Hi-Fi Studio
121 W. Washington NO 8-7942
(Across from Old German)
Just arrived .. .
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Cafeteria, Rm. 1430
Everybody is welcome

lediegs,
NEW YORK (t:) - The Cincin-
nati Reds and the Minnesota
Twins will open the World Series
in Cincinnati next October accord-
ing to a sampling of opinion
among baseball writers covering
the spring training camps.
If the writers are correct the
Reds will beat out the San Fran-
cisco Giants in a wild scramble
that also will involve the Atlanta
Braves, Los Angeles Dodgers,
Pittsburgh Pirates and Philadel-
phia Phillies.
A poll of 43 writers, scattered
among the 20 camps, picked the
Twins to repeat in the American
League in a tight finish with the
Baltimore Orioles and Detroit
Tigers. The Twins and Tigers each
drew 13 first place votes but Min-
nesota's total of 372 points was
good for first and Detroit's 362
left them third, one point behind
Baltimore.
Chicago, Cleveland and New

Twins ,Picked fc

York also drew at least one pen-
nant vote.
The writers korecast six-club
races in each league. St. Louis
and Chicago followed the top six
in the National with Houston and
the New Yolk Mets bringing up
the rear. The Mets were doomed
to 10th once more despite their
fine spring training season.
The Yanks, perennial champs in
the American League,. drew only
one first place vote and were
picked to finish sixth again. Cali-
fornia's Angels were ranked sev-
enth, followed by the also rans-
Washington, Boston and Kansas
City-in,-that order.
All polls will go out the window

Monday and Tuesday when they
get down to serious work with the
bat and ball. The 10-game open-
ing program, spread over two days,
is expected to draw about 320,000
fans.
Washington gets a chance to
hop away first when it opens Mon-
day with the special presidential
extravanganza. However, Cleve-
land is the opposition and Birdie
Tebbetts plans to throw Sam Mc-.
Dowell against the Senators.
Cincinnati also gets a chance to
steal a day's march by opening at
home Monday against the Mets.
The Tuesday program in the
American: Kansas City at Minne-
sota, California at Chicago, De-

SeriesPALMER, HOGAN
troit at New York and Baltimore
at Boston. By The Associated Press
There will be three night games AUGUSTA, Ga. - Baby-faced
Tuesday in the National including Tommy Jacobs came charging out
the Atlanta opener against Pitts- of the pack and tied defending
burgh before a sellout crowd of champion Jack Nicklaus for the
50,983 fans. Philadelphia will be third round lead in the Masters
at St. Louis and Houston at the Golf Tournament with an even
defending c h a m p i o n Dodgers' par 216 yesterday, but the loudest
home park. cheers went to a great champion
'Th I Onnannr 1 -1-I

TWO BACK:
Jacobs Deadlocked

0

OPENING DAY GAMES
Probable Pitchers and Estimated Attendance
MONDAY MONDAY
American League National League
Cleveland (McDowell 17-11), at New York (Fisher 8-24), at Cin-
Washington (Richert 15-12), 1:30 cinnati (Pappas 13-9), 2:30 p.m.,
p.m., 46,019. 30,000.
Only game scheduled. Only game scheduled.
TUESDAY
FUT7UV~'T~ ,.

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HAVE IT MADE-
WHEN THEY BUY, RENT OR LEASE
A CAR IN EUROPE FROM CTE
Write-Phone for Free Car Guide-Low Rate Student Plan
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Campus Rep. Richard Rogers, P.O. Box 112, Ann Arbor
CALL ANYTIME-662-5676

.. .. . .

TUIJE AY
American League
Kansas City (Hunter 8-8), at
Minnesota (Grant 21-7 or Pascual
9-3), 2:30 p.m., 27,000.
Detroit (Lolich 15-9), at New
York (Ford 16-13), 2 p.m., 35,000.
Baltimore (Barber 15-10), at
Boston (Wilson 13-14), 1:30 p.m.,
15,000.
California (Chance 15-10), at
Chicago (John 14-7), 2:15 p.m.,
25,000.
Only games scheduled.

National League
Houston (Roberts 5-2), at Los
Ongeles (Osteen 15-15), 11 p.m.,
35,000.
Chicago (Broglio 1-6), at San
Francisco (Marichal 22-13), 4 p.m.,,
42,500.
Pittsburgh(Veale 17-12), at At-'
lanta (Cloninger 24-11), 8:05 p.m.,
50,983.
Philadelphia (Bunning 19-9), at
St. Louis (Gibson 20-12), 9 p.m.,
24,000.
Only games scheduled.
Old

Thne i966 openers also will see
several clubs guided by new pilots
this year. In the American League,
Eddie Stanky takes over the Chi-
cago White Sox for the retired Al
Lopez. The beantowners of B'oston
will welcome Billy Herman, and
the Kansas City A's will try to
improve their last place finish of
last year under the tutelage of
Alvin Dark, former manager of
the San Francisco Giants.
In the National League, all eyes
are on Leo "The Lip" Durocher'
who retired fight coaches to take'
over the field generalship of the
Cubs. Houston initiates Grady
Hatton, and the Mets will begin
their first full year under Wes
Westrum.
Here's the way the vote went
with first place votes and points
on a 10-9-8-7-6-5-4-3-2-1 basis:
NATIONAL LEAGUE
1.Cincinnati (14) 371
2. San Francisco (11) 364
3. Atlanta (8) 320
4.Los Angeles (5) 319
5. Pittsburgh (3) 289
6. Philadelphia (2) 263
7. St. Louis 155
8. Chicago 132
9. Houston 80
10. New York 73
AMERICAN LEAGUE
1. Minnesota (13) 373
2. Baltimore (10) 363
3. Detroit (13) 362
4. Chicago (3) 362
5. Cleveland (3) 305
6. New York (1) 242
7. California 189
8. Washington 108
9. Boston 91
10. Kansas City 68

out of the past, Ben Hogan.
Amazing Ben
The amazing 53-year-old Hogan,
in semiretirement for 10 years,
beat Arnold Palmer in a head-to-
head duel and shot ah73 for 218,
which left him in the thick of
contention.
Palmer, with Hogan command-
ing the bulk of the gallery of close
to 50,000, settled for a wild, scat-
tershot 74-a strange mixture of
birdies and bogeys-also for a 218.
Jacobs, 31, from Bermuda Dunes,
Calif., played in semiprivacy in
cutting Augusta National's sprawl-
ing par 72 layout down to size
with a mechanical 70.
Nicklaus, the 26-year-old Gold-
en Bear from Columbus, Ohio,
youngest player ever to win this
title at 23 in 1963 and author of
the record 271 score last year,
bogeyed the last two holes for a
score of 72.
He led the field through most
of the calm, almost windless day
but at the 17th he blasted long
and wvent into a trap and at the
uphill, 18th he drove into the trees
at the right and then pitched onto
the fairway, reaching the green in
three and two-putting from about
10 feet.
Bogey Blues
Meanwhile, disaster s t r u c k
quickly for the two surprise sec-
ond round leaders, Paul Harney,
the prematurely graying home pro
from Sutton, Mass., and Peter
Butler, the British Ryder Cupper.
Harney bogeyed four holes in a
row-9, 10, 11 and 12-and fin-
ished with a 76 for 219. Butler
took double bogeys at the third

I

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A GRIMACING ARNOLD PALMER
and seventh for a nightmarish 79 It looked as if Nicklaus planned
and a score of 222. to retake full charge of the tour-
January, 38, who hasn't had a nament until he arrived at the
tour victory in almost two years, 155-yard, par 3 12th hole, which
came to the final hole with a
chance to tie for the lead. He I is fronted by a stream, of water
poled his approach into a trap andrbacked up by a hillside and
at the front of the green, blasted yawning. traps.
out 15 feet from the cup and miss- He dunked his tee shot into the
ed the putt for a bogey. left, rear trap. When he tried to
January finished with a 71 for get out, he moved the ball only six
217 feet, still in the trap, then re-
covered to within eight feet, miss-
Three players were tied at 219, ing the putt for a double bogey 5.
still very much in the dogfight,.iJgtebputtha sobe oge
They were dudish Doug San- Just about this same time.
ders, seeking his third straight Jacobs was making an equalizing
tournament triumph, 75; Jay He- shot on the 475-yard 13th. There
bert, elder of the two golfing he boomed a four-wood shot, hole
brothers from Lafayette, La., 73, high 40 feet to the left of the pin.
and big, long-hitting Ray Floyd Then he sank the putt for an
of St. Andrews, Ill. 74. eagle 3.
---Jacobs, who tied the U.S. Open
record for a single round with a
64 at Washington, D.C., in 1964,
also sank a 15-foot putt for a
birdie at the eighth but lost a shot
at the 10th, where he hit' an ap-
proach into the bunker. The rest
of the time, he was steady par.
saiI
ht

4
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UNIVERSITY LECTURE

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by

Center for Russian Studies
and

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Languages and Literatures

"Heresy Trial in Moscow: The Sinyavsky-Daniel Case"
Speaker
MAX HAYWARD
Fellow, St. Anthony's College, Oxford

4:00 P.M.

April 12, 1966

Lane Hall Auditorium

4

Mr. Hayward, an expert on current Soviet affairs, is the author of numer-

11

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