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April 09, 1966 - Image 8

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-04-09

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PAGE RIGHT

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY, APRIL 9. 1'966

PAGE EIGHT TIlE MICHIGAN DAiLY SATURDAY. APRIL W 1!~

vaa a. a, a a . i i ... t aa aroaad iT} li7UU

O

Acclaim
By MARCIA WICK
Theatre history is in the making
right here in Ann Arbor with "An
Evening's Frost," an original pro-
duction created by Professional
Theatre Program Director Mar-
cella Cisney and University poet
and faculty member, Donald Hall.
Although one is not usually in-
clined to think of Robert Frost in
terms of show business success,
this delicate combination of the
late Frost's thoughts and poems
has met with consistent nation-
wide success. Following its Ann
Arbor premiere in the spring of
1965, the production ran as an off-
Broadway hit for five months,
terminating in late February.
Highlighting the program's east-
ern run were two performances in
February at the Library of Con-

Greets

'Evening Frost" Sspension o Stanford
estival Tour of countries ranging I mative program based on the gim Clhi Chapter Ends

Across Campus

gress in Washington, D.C., on the
third anniversary of Frost's death.
While alive, not only had Frost
given several readings there, but
he also served as literary consul-
tant at the library.
"An Evening's Frost" has been
in great demand ever since its
conception. Negotiations are pres-
ently underway for a Near and Far
Eastern tour in the fall of 1966
under State Department sponsor-
ship. The show will then return
for a limited engagement in New
York, followed by a heavily-book-
ed college tour during the winter
and spring months of 1967.
In March the production will
again return to Ann Arbor, for
the benefit of those who missed its
original presentation. Final plans
at this point are for a European

Fe

from Scandinavia to the Iron Cur- works of one of America's poetic
tain and terminating in London in geniuses and designed specifically

the fall of 1967.
Plans for "An Evening's Frost"
first took shape in 1962, when
Miss Cisney attended a Frost read-
ing held at the University. During
the same year Miss Cisney also
heard actor Will Geer reading se
lections from Walt Whitman and
Mark Twain. Putting two and two
together, she. realized that "it was
natural chemistry to combine
Frost and Geer into one program."
Miss Cisney stated that "while
there is little physical resemblance
between the two, Geer's relation-
ship to the natural world seemed
very akin to that of Frost." En-
listing the aid of poet Hall, she
then created a moving and infor-

for one of America's
actors.
"An Evening's Frost'
simply of four actors-t
and one woman-who br
43 of Frost's poems, tied
by a running commenta
poet's own thoughts as
in his personal letters.
The presentation begin
early life as a farmer a
to support a wife and
dren on a meager incom
his move to England in
his subsequent recogn
contemporaries such as
Ezra Pound, and ends
eventual return to the
major literary figure.

foremost
" consists
three men
ing to life
d together
ary of the
expressed

Collegiate Press Service members of the Stanford chapter
STANFORD, Calif.-This is the insist this was the reason for the
week Sigma Chi's at Stanford Uni- disciplinary action, saying they
versity have been waiting for, be- had followed the ritual just as
cause it marks the end of their they had always done.
one-year suspension. A committee of national Sigma
The chapter was suspended by Chi officers, Stanford chapter un-
the executive committee of the dergraduates, and alumni has beenII
National Sigma Chi fraternity last reviewing the suspension, but
April for failing to keep the rit- Stanford University officials have
ual and for failing to keep the been kept in the dark about the
chapter house clean. committee's action.

SATURDAY, APRIL 9
7 and 9 p.m.-Cinema Guild will
present "The Bandits of Orgoloso"
in the Architecture Aud.
7 and 9 p.m.-Cinema Two pre-
sents Alfred Hitchcock's "Psycho"
in Aud. A.
7:30 p.m. - There will be a
SNCC Freedom Benefit at the
Ark, 1421 Hill St. Poetry and music
by various artists will be featured.
All proceeds are for Lowndes
County, Alabama.
8 p.m.-The University Players
will preseit Henrik Ibsen's "Peer
Gynt" in Trueblood Aud.

SUNDAY, APRIL 10
7 and 9 p.m.-Cinema Guild will
present "The Bandits of Orgoloso"
in the Architecture Aud.
7 and 9 p.m.-Cinema Two pre-
sents Alfred Hitchcock's "Psycho"
in Aud. A.

101

Rend

'0i

is with his The suspension came just be- "There has been no contact with
attempting fore the chapter members were our office," said John Hansen, as-
four chil- .to pledge the first Negro in the sistant dean of men at Stanford
ne, follows fraternity's 110-year history. The and Interfraternity Council ad-
1912 and national office had been inform- viser.
nition by ed the Negro would be pledged. Hansen predicted'that when the
Yeats and National officers of Sigma Chi decision of the Sigma Chi inves-
with his have denied that the Stanford tigating committee is announced
U.S. as a chapter was suspended because of it will be watched- with great'
the move to pledge a Negro, but interest by a number of other
campuses where Sigma Chi chap-
*. ters.. are being investigated to see
if they have autonomy in chosiltg
members.
"SigmaChi could lose 40 chap-
F IN ters overnight if they make no
..............blaantmistake," Hansen said.
:;:z:;:::>: .............................z...::.:":::;::managed toofa t eyve ma acloudlo d

Daily
Classi fieds

DALI 171.CFFICIAL BULLEI
':"LY"W..: . . . .L.. ..-. Kv ... ................. . . .C.. .

THREE EASTER SERVICES
AT
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
State at Huron and Washington
SUNDAY, APRIL 10
AND THIS IS LIFE ETERNAL
Dr. Hoover Rupert preacihng at each Service
EASTER CHORAL MUSIC-THREE CHOIRS
Mary McCall Stubbins, Organist
i 1:15 A.M. to 12:30 P.M.-
Service Broadcast, WOIB-am, WOIA-fm
- -r--- - -

10

The Daily Offlctai Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The l
Michigan Daily assumes no editor-
ial responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3519 Administration Bldg. be-
fore 2 p.m. of the day preceding
publication, and by 2 p.m. Friday 1
for Saturday and Sunday. General
Notices may be published a maxi- ,
mum of two times on request'; Day t
Calendar items appear once only
Student organiration notices are not
accepted for publication.1
SATURDAY, APRIL 9]
*Day Calendar
School of Music Guest Recital-George
Katz, pianist: Recital Hall, School oft
Music, 4:30 p.m.
Cinema Guild-"The Bandits of Orgo-
loso": Architecture Aud., 7 and 9 p.m.
Dept. of Speech University Playersc
Performance-"Peer Gynt" by Henrik]
Ibsen: Trueblood Aud., 8 p.m.
General Notices
Doctoral Examination for Richard
Charles Hespen, English Language &
Literature; thesis: "Ludwig Lewisohn
at Literary Critic," Sat., April 9, 1611
Haven Hall, at 10 a.m. Chairman, Mor-
ris Greenhut.
Doctoral Examination for George Syl-
van Bobinski, Library Science; thesis:
"Andrew Carnegie's Role in American
Public Library Development," Sat., April
9, 311 General Library, at 9 a.m. Chair-
man, R. E. Bidlack.1
Doctoral Examination for Chester Ray-
mond Leach, Jr., English Language &
Literature; thesis: "A Critical Edition
of Tennyson's 'In Memoriam'," Sat.,
April 9, E. Council Room, Rackham,
Bldg., at 1:15 p.m. Chairman, Karl
Litzenberg.
Doctoral Examination for Anthony
Grayum Bing, English Language & Lit-
erature; thesis: "French Criticism of
Shakespeare, 1930-1960," Sat., April 9,
2601 Haven Hall, at 9:30 a.m'. Chair-
man, John Arthos.
Recommendations for Departmental
Honors: Teaching departments wishing
to recommend tentative April graduates
from the College of Literature, Science,
and the Arts, for honors or high honors
should recommend such students by
forwarding a letter to the Director,
Honors Council. 1210 Angell Hall, be-
fore noon, Thurs., April 28, 1966.
Teaching departments in the School
of Education should forward letters
directly to the Office of Registration
and Records, Room 1513 Administration
Bldg., by noon, Thurs., April 28, 1966.
Attention Faculty Members Of: Col-
lege of iLterature, Science, and the
Arts, School of Education, School of
Music, School of Public Health and
School of Business Administration: Stu-
dents, expecting degrees April 30, 1966.
are advised not to request grades of
I or X. When such grades are abso-
lutely imperative, the work must be
made up in time to allow you to report
the make-up grade not later than noon,
Thurs., April 28, 1966.
Wanted: 20 graduate students to as-
sess tuition at Spring-Summer Registra-
tion, May 3 and 4. $1.50 per hour. Re-
port to Room 3007 Administration Bldg.
as soon as possible.
Student Government Council Approval
of the following student-sponsored
events becomes effective 24 hours after
the publication of this notice. All
publicity for these events must be
withheld until the approval has become
effective.
Approval request forms for student
sponsored events are available in Room
1011 of the SAB.

Phi Sigma Sigma (and Panhellenic
Association), cookie sale, Fishbowl and
Diag, April 12-13, 9-5 p.m.
Summary of Action Taken by Student
Government Council at Its Meeting
April 7, 1966
Approved: That SGC appoint Jim Ben-
ton treasurer.
Approved: 1) Routine approval of
summer activities be delegated to the
Office of Student Organizations. 2) If
there is a question raised, appeals and
intricate matters shall be handled by
the summer interim committee com-
posed of Ed Robinson, Cynthia Samp-
son, Mark Simons and Ruth Baumann.
In September the Council may review
the actions of the interim committee.
Anything other than activity approval
shall be decided by the Council by a
post-card ballot with interim commit-
tee recommendation included if possible
Approved: That SGC accept these rec-
ommendations as the SGC recommenda-
tions to the Calendaring Committee:
Fall Concerts given by: Band, Glee
Club, Homecoming, Panhellenic-IFC, Al-
pha Phi Omega-Pershing Rifle Club,
Sesquicentennial Committee. Z
Shows presented by: Soph Show,
Gilbert and Sullivan.
Winter Concerts: IHA, Development
Council Stud. Relations Board.
Shows: MUSKET, Gilbert. and Sulli-
van.
Other events: Creative Arts Festival,
World Fair, Winter Weekend, IFC Sing.
Approved: That the office equipment
in Rm. 1550 be moved to Rm. 1548 which
will serve as the SGC library, mimeo
room and committee meeting room.
Approved: That SGC allocate Rm. 1550
to Joint Judiciary Council for perma-
nent office space.
Approved: That Rm. 1532 be assigned
to the Student Housing Association as
an SGC committee.
Approved: That Rm. 1528 be retained
under the control of SGC as an activi-
ties room.
Approved: That the Student Sesqui-
centennial Committee be given desk
and file space in Rm. 1523.
Approved: That the Writer-in-Resi-
dence Committee be given desk and
file space in Rm. 1528.
Approved: That the executive vice-
president relocate the Folklore Society
when possible to enable GSC to make
full use of the office they now share.
Approved: That the administrative
vice-president investigate the cost and
practicality of prefabricated offices for
the first and second floor open areas.
Approved: That SNCC and Voice Po-
litical Party combine office space.
Approved: That REACH be given a
desk and file in Rm. 1528.
Approved: That Student Government
Council appoint Cynthia Sampson, Ed
Robinson, Ruth Baumann and Bob
Smith delegates to the NSA Conference
and Mark Simons, Steve Schwartz, Sher-
ry Meyer, Jim Benton and Mike Dean
as alternates.
Approved: That SGC schedule Home-
coming 167 for the Indiana game, Oc-
tober 21, 1967.
Approved: That SGC grant the Twad-
dler temporary recognition.
Approved: That SGC grant Sigma
Pi temporary recognition as a colony.
Approved: That SGC grant the Com-
mittee for Improved Education tempor-
ary recognition.
Approved: That SGOC grant the W.E.B.
DuBois Club temporary recognition.
Approved: That SGC grant the South-
ern Asia Club temporary recognition.
Approved: That SGC grant Delta Phi
Epsilon (National Professional Foreign
Service Fraternity) permanent recogni-
tion.
Approved: That SGC grant the Amer-
ican Institute of Architects temporary
recognition.
Approved: That SGC grant Universi-
ty of Michigan Dames the privileges of
a student organization.
Approved: That Student Government
Council supports the goal of higher
salaries, smaller section sizes, and bet-
ter office space for teaching fellows.
And Student Government Council sup-
ports the joint and cooperative effort

by teaching fellows to obtain this goal.
Appointed: Rick Handel and Jim Ben-
ton to the Driving Regulations Board.
Appointed: Marg Asman and Rick
Handel to the Univelsity Calendaring
Committee.
Approved: That Student Government
Council dissolve the Board of Directors
of the Student Book Exchange and
transfer all .funds left in its account
to the Council's general fund, to be
used at the discretion of the Council
(unanimously).
Approved: That SGC appropriate $175
for a letter to be sent to all incoming
freshmen explaining the "Campus Ac-
tivities Internship Program." The letter
will also contain an application form
which will enable them to sign up for
the course.
Approved: That SGC appropriate $2,-
000 to cover the expenses of our dele-
gates to the USNSA Conference of 1966.
Approved: That SGC appropriate to
Student Housing Association the fol-
lowing in order for SHA to carry out
its summer program with some flexibil-
ity:
$600-Publication of the legal booklet
(with president's approval of content).
$900-Voter registration and planning,
(materials, transportation, planning and
advertising, etc.).
$500-Legal cases pool.
$2100-Total.
All SHA summer fund expenditures
over $25 must be made with prior
knowledge and approval of SGC presi-
dent. Money not spent by first SGC
meeting will be turned over to the gen-
eral fund.
Placement I
POSITION OPENINGS:
Mobil Chemical Co., Macedon, N.Y. -
Senior Programmer. BA in Bus. Ad
ORGAN IZATION
NOTICES
USE OF THIS COLUMN FOR AN-
NOUNCEMENTS is available to officially
recognized and registered student orga-
nizations only. Forms are available in
Room 1011 SAB.
Newman Student Association, Sat.
April 9, 11 p.m., 331 Thompson, Holy
Sat. Easter Vigil, breakfast immediately
following.
* s
University Lutheran Chapel, 1511
Washtenaw, Easter Sunrise service, 7
a.m., with Holy Communion. Breakfast
immediately following. April 10, Easter
Sun. Festival Services: 9:45 & 11:15,
April 10, Rev. A. Scheips, speaker.
Folk Dancing Club (WAA), Interme-
diate folk dancing, every Mon., 8:30-
10:30 p.m., Women's Athletic Bldg.
U. of M. Seventh Day Adventist Stu-
dent Assoc., Discussion group, April 9,
3 p.m., UGLI Multipurpose Rm. Dr.
Raoul Dederen from Collonges, France,
will speak on "Heathen & Christian
Rome."

or Math desirable, will consider super-
ior ability with no degree. 2 yrs. exper.
on 1400 series equip. pref. plus knowl.
of 360.
Mgmt. Consultants, Kansas City, Mo.
-Product Dev. Leader and Mgr.. of
Tech. Mktg. BS VChem. Exper. in Food
or Fine Chem. Prod. Dev., Mkt. Dev. or
related.
St. Lawrence Hospital, Lansing, Mich.
-Head Librarian for Hospital Library.
Modern dept. recently expanded to in-
clude the School of Nursing Library.
North Penn Gas Co., Port Allegany,
Pa.-Lawyer to handle various areas
of public utility including rates &
regulations, oil & gas leases, rights;
of way & easements, insurance, labor
relations. May lead to gen. mgmt. du-
ties.
Blodgett Memorial Hospital, Grand
Rapids, Mich.-Lab Asst. for Chem. De-
partment. Grad with major in Chem. or
strong chem bkgd. including, gen., or-
ganic quantitative analysis, esp. bio-
chem. No exper. required.
Minnesota Mutual Life Insurance Co.,
St. Paul, Minn.-Various openings in-
cluding 1. Actuarial Trainee. Degree
in Bath, B plus average. 2. Program-
mer Trainee. Degree in math or bus.

with strong math bkgd. 3. Asst. Corp.
Attorney. Recent grad, Minn. license
req. Will consider Sr. Law Student. Also
Group Sales Repres., Sales Promotion
Agency Supv., etc.
Round Lake Area Youth Council,
Round Lake, III.-Recreation Director.
Administer & implement program in
conjunction with O.E.C., War on Pov-
erty program in the area. Qualified
Recreation grad, no exper. required.
* * *

the issue-at least here."
Hansen said that most fraterni-
ties at Stanford are completely in-
tegrated and pledge anyone they
wish. Two fraternities at Stan-'
ford have gone local in the past
few years. Sigma Nu dropped out
of its national because of the race
issue and Alpha Tau Omega be-
cause of religious difficulties with

For further information, please callt
764-7460, General Div. Bureau of Ap- the national.
pointments, 3200 SAB.
SUMMER PLACEMENT SERVICE:
212 SAB-
Mackinac College, Mackinac Island,
Mich.-General Labor-$2/hr. Work as
nItany hours as you want, no time & a
half. Men only.
Ford Motor Co., Cleveland, Ohio
Assembly type work, start as soon as
school is out.
Trueman Girl, Detroit-Will interview
April 11, 12, 13 & 14 for jobs in the fol-
lowing states: Ga., Ohio, Mich. & Calif.
Details at Summer Placement, 212
SAB, Lower Level.

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