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April 09, 1966 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-04-09

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SATURDAY, APRIL 9, 1966

THE MICHIGAN DAILY'

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easATRAARL916 U IHcA AL I~Z 3~L

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6

'Homeward

Bound'

Nelson

Resigns

Post

End Coach
Returns to'
Old School
By HOWARD KOHN
One of the inescapable facts
of the coaching profession is that
coaches do leave schools, no mat-
ter how strong the ties.
Jack Nelson, the tall, smiling'
man that everyone called "Jocko"
and who was Michigan's defensive
end coach, resigned yesterday to
accept the head coaching job at
his alma mater, Gustavus Adol-
phus College of St. Peter, Minn.
"It was a very tough decision
to make," said Nelson. "I've been
thinking about it for the last 10
days, wanting to leave but, at,
the same time not really wanting
to leave if you know what I
mean.
"Michigan has some of the fin-
est coaches in the country, and
I'll miss working with them as
well as working with the players.
I've had some exciting moments
here. I'll never forget games like
that 10-0 shutout over Ohio State
that gave us the championship.
"But I feel that anyone who
ever enters coaching wants to be-
come a head coach. And this job
will also be more convenient for
my family-I won't be traveling as
much for recruiting, and we have
a summer resort business in Min-
nesota."
The 39-year-old Nelson came
to Michigan seven years ago along
with head Coach Bump Elliott,
Hank Fonde and Jack Fauts, who
is now head coach at Ohio Wes-
leyan. Don Dufek and Bob Holl-
way, who resigned earlier this
year to enter the business world.
were the other grid coaches in
1959.
"I feel a great deal of regret at
seeing Coach Nelson leave the
staff. He's done a tremendous job
and. we all wish him well," said
Elliott simply.
Busy Man on Campus
Nelson and his wife met while
attending the small, Lutheran-
supported college of Gustavus
Adolphus back in 1946-49.
Nelson earned letters in five var-
sity sports and also played minor
league pro baseball, since Adol-
phus wasn't a member of the
NCAA until 1948, and league rules
allowed freshmen to play a cou-
ple years of minor league ball.
After graduation, Nelson decid-
ed upon a coaching career, spend-
ing four years with Minnesota
high school teams, three at Utah
State, and then two at Colorado
before joining Michigan's staff.
So far there has been no re-
port on who will assume Nelson's
duties in Ann Arbor-but replac-
ing "Jocko" means, of course, that
another coach will be leaving an-
other .school somewhere.

n

Big

Ten Rules

To Permit Frosh Grid Games

By HOWARD KOHN
The other day some guy was
overheard complaining that execu-
tives are always either going to a
meeting or attending a meeting
and that nothing significant ever
results from these everlasting
meetings. "Take, for instance,
sports executives. These guys-
there's a couple from each univer-
sity-get together for a confer-
ence meeting some place and they
spend all their time congratulating
each other and nothing else hap-
pens," insisted he.
Well sir, next year's freshman
football players in the Big Ten
think otherwise. In the recent
winter assembling of the athletic
directors and faculty representa-
tives from the Big Ten, a resolu-
tion was passed to permit confer-
ence freshmen teams to schedule
games with other collegiate frosh
beginning in the 1966 season.

JOCKO NELSON

SPORTS SHORTS:
Robie Cops First;
Masters' Lead Split

By The Associated Press
BRANDON, Fla. - Michigan's
Carl Robie captured first in the
200-yard butterfly yesterday as
Fred and Bruce Brown, also of
Michigan, bothl placed in the
three-meter diving in the National
AAU Swimming and Diving Cham-
pionships.
Robie took his event in 1:54.9,
nine-tenths of a second better
than the time second-place Luis
Nicolas of Stanford mustered.
Bruce Brown took sixth in the
three-meter event with a score
of, 520.50 out of a possible 600,
while Fred Brown scored 435.45
to finish twelfth.
It was the second straight year
that Roble had taken the crown in
his event. His feat was matched by
that of Don Schollander, famous
Yale swimmer, who successfully
defended his title in the 200-yard
freestyle with a time of 1:42.8,
six-tenths of a second better than
Roy Saari of USC's time.
S * *
Harney, Butler Lead
AUGUSTA-Paul Harney, long-
hitting Sutton, Mass., professional,
birdied five of the last seven holes
to shoot 68 yesterday in the second
round of the Masters Golf Tourna-
SCORES
EXHIBITION BASEBALL
New York (A) 5, Atlanta 4
Houston 6, Detroit 4

ment and take the early lead with
a 36-hole total of 143.
Harney's four-under-par round
equalledathe first dayhscore of
leader Jack Nicklaus, who took a
bogey six on the second hole
today and was three under par
for the tournament after five
holes.
Harney, 36-year-old veteran who
has been a pro since 1954, turned
in a pair of 34s in his tour of the
6,980-yard Augusta National course
to go along with a first day 75.
Later in the day, Peter Butler
carded a one-under-par 71 to tie
Harney for the lead. Butler had
shot an even par 72 in the first
round Thursday.
Nicklaus sank into a five-way
second place tie at 144 by scoring
a four-over-par 76 to go with his
opening round of 68. The others
at 144 were Bob Rosberg, Doug
Sanders, Arnold Palmer and Don
January.
Davis Prexy
HOUSTON-Al Davis, general
manager and coach of Oakland,
was named commissioner of the
American Football League yester-
day and John Rauch was picked
as his successor as boss of the
Raiders.
Davis's selection as the man to
succeed Joe Foss, who resigned
Thursday, was made here. The
promotion of Rauch, 'formerly
Davis' assistant with the Raiders,
was made in San Diego.

Intercollegiate competition in
the Big Ten will be limited to just
two games and to just the sport
of football, but it does mean a
definite change in the conference's
policy on the status of a freshman.
The games, which will be played
late in the fall, will mark the first
time any Big Ten team, except for
Michigan, has competed on the
freshman level. Prior to Michigan's
admittance into the Big Ten in
1918, the frosh Wolverines partici-
pated in football and baseball
games against other freshmen
from small colleges. The football
schedule included five games.
Elmer Mitchell, Michigan coach
in the late 1910's and early 1920's,
recalls that the last Wolverine
freshmen contests were played in
the fall of 1917. "When Michigan
joined the conference, it discon-
tinued these games because con-
ference rules prevented freshmen
competition."
Such was the position the Big
Ten took until the vote in Decem-
ber's meeting.
Interest Waxes
Interest for establishing some
sort of non-varsity competition for
the frosh has been increasing for
the past few years. "Proponents of
the proposal believed that playing
a couple of games at the end of
the season would give meaning to
the effort the boys put in during
fall practice.
"They intended that these games
be a type of climax to the season.
No one was in favor of a full-
fledged schedule," explained Prof.
Marcus Plant, Michigan's faculty
representative in the Big Ten.
'White Resolution'
The proposal was first introduc-
ed in the May meeting in the
spring of 1965 and was subse-
Billb oard
The Michigan Lacrosse Club
invites spectators to its match
with Michigan State this after-
noon. The teams will clash at
Wines Field at 2 p.m.
Michigan's Rugby Club will
meet the Sarnia, Ontario, Rugby
Club at 3 p.m. today on the IM
field next to Stadium Blvd.
Sarnia's Harlequins are the
team Michigan beat last fall to
gain the championship of its
conference, the 36-team North-
west Ontario League.
Michigan's football team will
hold its next-to-last scrimmage
today at 2 p.m. at Ferry Field.
Next week's scrimmage will be
a full-blown affair in Michigan
Stadium.

quently adopted as a "white reso-e
lution." This procedure is reservedc
for all significant pieces of legis-
lation and allows for a 60-day in-t
terim period before the bill goes1
into effect. During this time, any2
school that disagrees with the pro-e
posal has the opportunity to notify
Big Ten headquarters and thus
force reconsideration of the bills
at the next meeting, .
At the December meeting, con-c
ference officials did discuss thef
proposal again, but, despite somef
arguments to the contrary, thex
bill was passed.f
"Most of the schools were
swayed by the interest factor," ex-t
pounded Larry Catuzzi, assistantc
football coach at Ohio State. "We
felt that getting a chance for someX
real game action would give thet
boys more incentive.-
"We realized that we would beT
at a disadvantage in comparisonc
to a school like Michigan becausef
of our late registration date in the
fall, but we voted 'yes'."'
'M' Votes 'No'
Michigan, on the other hand,E
cast its vote against the proposalk
"because it was not extended to
include other sports."
"Michigan's position was that ifk
the principle of the idea was good
enough for football, then why
wasn't it good enough for sports
like basketball, track, etc.?" ex-
plained Plant.
Contrast to Ivies
The policy of the Big Ten on
this point does contrast sharply
to that of the Ivy League and of
several southern conferences. The
Ivy League schools, which have
had intercollegiate contests for
freshmen as long as anyone can
remember, include all 16 varsity
sports in the scheduling of frosh
games. In addition, their schedules

are extensive, with a 16-game slate
common to freshmen cagers.
In the Southeastern Conference,
the freshmen athletes have also
been granted an okay in all sports
and have also been given full-
capacity slates in the major sports.
Midwest More Conservative
This overall interaction of all
sports has, as a rule, not developed
to such an intensity in midwestern
conferences, but both the Big
Eight and the Mid-American Con-
ferences have long set up basket-
ball and football tilts for their
first-year athletes.
Among the major conferences in
the nation, only the Pacific Eight
on the west coast has a stand sim-
ilar to the Big Ten's on freshmen
participation. Intercollegiate ac-
tion, even in football, is still on an
inconsistent basis there since
UCLA and USC have been the only
conference members to schedule
freshmen football games.
In the Big Ten, however, there
is a proposal currently under con-
sideration that freshmen be allow-
ed to compete on an intercollegiate
basis in all sports.
Voting in May
The individual conference mem-
bers are now studying the bill in
Hi-Fl Studio
121 W. Washington NO 8-7942
(Across from Old German)

HARD PRESSED
to find the kind of summer housing that's
just right for you? Call or come in to
STUDENT RENTAL SERVICE, Ann Arbor's
ONLY professional subletting service, and
check our lists. There is NO CHARGE for
this service!
We're the only clearing house of this kind
in the Ann Arbor area, so if we don't have
what you're looking for, it probably doesn't
eXI~t
exist.
STUDENT RENTAL SERVICE
1215 S. University
(across from Campus Theater)
NO 5-4480 or NO 5-4489

preparation for a discussion and
vote in the next meeting, May
19-21. If conference officials do
agree to the proposal, it will have'
to be okayed as a "white proposal.":
What may seem like unnecessary
red tape or political non-action to
the discontented critic of executive
procedure is only a careful evalu-
ation of the old situation, the pro-

posed new changes and the pre-
dicted effects.
Moreover, it will be the Big Ten
freshmen athletes who will per-
sonally know whether or not ex-
ecutives, even sports executives, do
produce results at their meetings.
SPORTS NIGHT EDITOR:
STEVE FICK

777"

Just arrived.. .
COLOR TV SH IPMENT-
VM--GRUNDIG-
STEREO CONSOLES.
SERVICE PROBLEMS?
TRY OUR EXPANDED.
DOWNTOWN SERVICE

1

it

;::W-

WORSHIP

FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST
SCIENTIST
1833 Washtenaw Ave.
For transportation call 665-2149
9:30 a.m.-Sunday School for pupils from
2 to 20 years of age.
11:00 a.m.-Sunday morning church service.
Infart care during service.
11:00 a.m.-Sunday School for pupils from 2
to 6 years of age.
A free reading roam is maintained at 306 E.
Liberty. Open daily except Sundays and
holidays from 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.;
Monday evenings from 7:00 to 9:00 p.m.
HURON HILLS BAPTIST CHURCH
Presently meeting at the YM-YWCA
Affiliated w'th the Baptist General
Conference
Rev. N. Geisler
SUNDAY SERVICES
9:45 a.m.-Sunday Bible School.
11 :00 a.m.-Morning Worship.
7:00 p.m.-Evening Gospel Hour.
An active University group meets each Sunday
for the 9:45 service.
Coffee is served at 9:30 a.m.

I il

STUDENTS.If you have Used Books
to Sell ii- Read This!
As the Semester end approaches-bringing with it a period of heavy book selling by students-ULRICH'S
would like to review with you their BOOK BUY-BACK POLICY.
Used books fall into several categories, each of which-because of the law of supply and demand-has
its own price tag. Let's explore these various categories for your guidance.
CLASS 1.
A textbook of current copyright-used on our campus-and which the Teaching Department involved
has approved for re-use next semester-has the highest market value. If ULRICH'S needs copies of this book
we will offer a minimum of 50% of the list price for copies in good physical condition. When we have sufficient
stock of a title for the coming semester, ULRICH'S will offer a "WHOLESALE PRICE" which will be explained
later in this article. (THIS IS ONE REASON FOR SELLING ALL YOUR USED BOOKS AT ONCE.)
CLASS I1.
Some of the above Class I books will be offered which have torn bindings, loose pages or other physical
defects. These will be priced down according to the estimated cost of repair.
CLASS III.
Each semester various professors decide to change texts for a given course. These decisions on change of
textbooks are made in echelons of THINKING AND AUTHORITY for above the level of your local book retail-
ers, AND ULRICH'S HAS NO PART IN THE DECISION. (QUITE OFTEN WE HAVE MANY COPIES OF THE
OLD TITLE OF WHICH YOU HAVE ONLY ONE.)
However, ULRICH'S DO enter the picture by having connections with over 600 other bookstores through-
out the country. We advertise these discontinued books and sell many of them at schools where they are still
being used. ULRICH'S do this as a service to you and pay you the BEST POSSIBLE price when you sell them to us
with your currently used books.
CLASS IV.
Authors and publishers frequently bring out new.editions. When we "get caught" with an old edition,
let's accept the fact that it has no value on the wholesale market, and put it on the shelf as a reference book

THE CHURCH OF CHRIST
W. Stadium at Edgewood
Across from Ann Arbor High
Rev. V. Palmer, Minister

SUNDAY
10:00 a.m.-Bible School
1 1:00 a.m.-Regular Warship.
6:00 p.m.-Evening Warship.
WEDNESDAY
7:30 p.m.-Bible Study.
Transportation6furnished for all
NO 2-2756.

ST: ANDREW'S CHURCH and
the EPSICOPAL STUDENT
FOUNDATION
EASTER SUNDAY
7:00 A.M.-Holy Communion and Sermon.
9:00 A.M.-Holy Communion and Sermon.
Breakfast following at the Canterbury House.
11:00 A.M.-Holy Communion and Sermon.
4:00 P.M.-Family Service.
MONDAY
10:00 A.M.-Holy Communion.,
TUESDAY
7:00 A.M.-Holy Communion.
WEDNESDAY
7:00 A.M-Holy Communion.
FRIDAY
12:10 P.M.-Holy Communion.
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
1511 Washtenaw Ave.
(The Lutheran Church--Missouri Synod)
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Theodore L. Scheidt, Assistant Pastor
Sunday at 7:00 A.M.-Easter Sunrise Service,
with sermon by the Rev. Theodore Scheidt,
"Until He Comes". Holy Communion.
Sunday at 8:15 A.M.-Fellowship Breakfast,
sponsored by Gamma Delta.
Sunday at 9:45 and 11:15-Easter Festival
Services, with sermon by the Rev. Alfred
T Scheips, "HIS WITNESS TO THE PEO-
PLE."
Tuesday at 6:00-Married Students' "Potluck
Supper."
Wednesday at 10:00 P.M.-Midweek Devotion
ST. MARY'S STUDENT CHAPEL
331Thompson
NO 3-0557
Msgr. Bradley, Rev. Litka, Rev. Ennen
SUNDAY-Masses at 7:00, 8:00, 9:15, 10:45,
12:00, 12:30.
MONDAY-SATURDAY - Masses at 7:00,
8:00, 9:00, 11:30 a.m. and 12:00 and
5:00 p.m. Confessions following masses.
WEDNESDAY-7:30 p.m. - Evening Mass.
Confessions following.
SATURDAY-Confessions-3:30-5:00; 7:30-
9:00 p.m.
UNIVERSITY REFORMED CHURCH
1001 E. Huron at Fletcher
Pastors: Malefyt and Van Haven
7:30 A.M.-Easter Sunrise Service. Meet at
the Church.
8:30A.M.-Breakfast.
9:30 A.M.-Church School.
10:30 A.M.-Worship service with Rev. Male-
fyt speaking.
7:00 P.M.-Rev. Van Haven speaking at the
Evening Service.
8:30 P.M.-Collegiate Forum. Topic: "About
Those Exams."

FIRST METHODIST CHURCH &
WESLEY FOUNDATION
At State and Huron Streets
Phone 2-4536
Hoover Rupert, Minister
Eugene Ransom, Campus Minister
SUNDAY
6:30 A.M.-Easter Sunrise Service of Hoty
Communion,. Chapel.
7:00 A.M.-Easter Breakfast, Pine Room.
8:30, 10:00 and 11:30 A.M.-Worship Serv-
ices, Dr. Rupert, "What Jesus Thought
About Eternal Life,"
6:00 P.M.-Fellowship Supper, Pine Room.
7:00 P.M.-Program, Dr. Jesse DeWitt, "The
Methodist Church and the Inner City,"
Wesley Lounge.
TUESDAY
5:00 P.M.-Church Related Vocations Group,
Green Room. Charles Bearden speaking
on, "God Is Not Dead." Dinner in Pine
Room at 6:00 P.M.
7:00 A.M.-Holy Communion, Chapel, fol-
lowed by breakfast in the Pine Roam.
Out in time for 8:00 A.M. classes.
WEDNESDAY
5:10 P.M.-Holy Communion, Chapel.
LUTHERAN STUDENT CENTER
AND CHAPEL
Notional Lutheran Council
Hill St. at Forest Ave.
Dr. H. 0. Yoder, Pastor
EASTER SUNDAY SERVICES:
6 :30 A.M.-Matins Service.
9:30 A.M.-Festival Service,
1 :00 A.M.-Chief Festival Service.
CAMPUS CHAPEL
1236 Washtenaw
Donald Postema, Minister
10:00 A.M.'Morning Worship Service, "The
End is Life".
11:00 A.M.-Coffee Hour.
7:00 P.M.-Special Easter Service. Medita-
tions on "The Presence of the Risen
Christ."
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
Phone 662-4466
14 32 Washtenow Ave.
Ministers: Ernest T. Campbell, Malcolm' G.
Brown, John W. Waser, Harold S. Horan
SUNDAY
Worship at 9:00, 10:30, and 12:00-12:45.
Bible Study for College Students at 10:30 a.m.
Presbyterian Campus Center located at the
Church.

services-Call

ZION LUTHERAN CHURCH
1501 W. Liberty St.
Ralph B. Piper, David Bracklein,
Fred Holtfreter, Pastors
Worship Services-8:30 and 11:00 a.m.
Holy Communion - Second Sunday of each
month.
Church School & Adult Bible Class-9:35 a.m.
Holy Baptism-First Sunday of month.
Nursery facilities during worship services and
church school.
BAPTIST CAMPUS CENTER
& FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
502 and 512 E. Huron
Phone 663-9376
9:00 and 11:00 A.M.-Services.
10:00 A.M.-Coffee and Doughnuts at the
Campus Center,

BETHLEHEM UNITED CHURCH
OF CHRIST
423 S. Fourth Ave.
Rev. E. R. Kloudt, Rev. A. C. Bizer, and

FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
1917 Washtenaw Ave.
Erwin A. Gaede, Minister
9:00 and 11:30 A.M-Church School and
Service, A Sermon in Poetry: "The Human
Reserves That Shape History."
10:15 A.M.-Church School and Adult Dis-

GRACE BIBLE CHURCH

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