100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

April 07, 1966 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-04-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE TWO

TIDE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, APRIL 7.,1.960

PAGE TWO TIlE MICHIGAN DAILY THURSDAY. APRIL 7 l9fiS

as vi..aa a a. u _iv4

,-

Conditions
e viewed,
(Continued froni Page 1)
back in and split the apartments
down the middle, turning the bar
into a second kitchenette-creat-
ing a 40-unit apartment.
According to Clare Wheeler of
the city building department, this
was 'discovered when the Detroit
Edison Company asked the city
why'a 20-unit apartment had 40
electric meters.
An injunction was brought
against the owner because he had
provided insufficient. parking fa-
c'ilities for a 40-unit apartment.
The matter was resolved when the
owner closed several of the ad-
dtional units to comply with
parking regulations. Skolnick sub-
sequently sold the building and is
now attending law school in New.
York.
'While the city aeted promptly
in this situation, Mrs. Kraker of
the Doff-campus housing bureau
clainsthe situation was atypical.
Inadequate
-She -claims that city inspection
procedures are woefully inade--
quate..
Her charges are seconded by
Councilman Robert Weeks, who
points to one home that was not
closed .Aown ,despite five years of
housing inspections that found
faulty wiring, unsafe plumbing, in-
adequate heating and violated
state fire laws.

of Student Housing
Justified, Criticized

DRAMA
To Be Read, Not Produced

Drowse at the LMS for ideal Easter
gifts ... LP albums to suit 'all tastes.
Gift wrapped and mailed for your
convenienice.

-1
I-

0

His charges are supported by
President Hatcher's Blue Ribbon
Committee housing report, which
says that many University stu-
dents have been and are living in
grossly substandard rooms and
apartments that have not been
inspected or certified for years.
"And there are a great number of
code violations that go unnoticed
because of inadequate inspection,"
she adds.
Not Notified
She claims that when inspec-
tions do take place the tenant is
never notified by the city. In one
recent inspection, exposed electri-
cal wiring that could have started
a fire was found. The tenants
could have easily been trapped
since there was only one exit from
the basement.
Following normal policy, the city
notified the tenants but not the
owner. According to Mrs. Kraker,
the tenants were left in ignorance
of their situation until the land-
lord finally got around to improv-
ing the situation.
"The city hardly ever closes
anything up," she says. In orv
rare case, the city actually did
close up an attic garret on Forest
St.-but only because the inspec-
tor discovered bats flying around
the room.
nseliii Plan

Optional Cou

Attracts Few Students

Wheeler says that until a year
ago the city building department
was a one man operation and, "he
couldn't follow up and check on
compliance of all violations."
Last year the department was
expanded to a three man opera-
tion, which is currently giving the
town the once-over and hoping to
repeat inspections every two years.
No Low-Rent
Although the city is quickly be-
ing saturated with high-rent
apartment structures, private
apartment developers indicate lit-
tle interest in building low-rent
housing.
"Our experience has, been that
the most luxurious units always
fill up first," says one major de-
veloper.
"It seems to me it's the market.
Low rent units just wouldn't rent,"
says VanCurler,
Hurts Poor
Yet attorney Peter Darrow says
that one of the defects of the
current multiple construction is
that it replaces much of the city's
low rent propery.
"A person will come in and buy
up the property and kick the-ten-
ants on the street. Often they are
poor people who are eventually
forced into substandard housing.
It seems to me the city has a re-
sponsibility to do something for
these people," Darrow maintains.
The city's Economic Base Re-
port also points out that Ann Ar-
bor has a higher proportion of
families with incomes under $4000.
The Federal Public Housing Au-
thority has indicated that the city
is eligible for 476 low-cost hous-
ing units.
Hulcher's Commission
Last fall Mayor Wendell Hulch-
er won approval for a city hous-
ing commission despite the an-
nounced opposition of Ann Arbor's
Board of Realtors and the Cham-
ber of Commerce.
Hulcher then appointed what he
called a "middle-of-the-road com-
mission," including Joseph Ed-
wards and William Conlin, both
members of the board of directors
of the Chamber of Commerce.
Last week, in a straight party-
line 6-5 split, the City Council
Republicans defeated the Housing
Commission's plan to obtain $35,-
000 from the Public Housing Au-
thority to examine the need for
low income housing here, and com-
mit the city to the construction
of 200 PHA units if they are
needed.
The Dregs
One argument, posed by Repub-
lican Councilman Paul Johnson,
was that the Corvettes and Jag-
uars of students were filling up
the parking lot of the Colonial
Square apartments, a new medium
rent housing development. "The
students are the dregs of society.
Why do we need to provide hous-
ing for them?" he asked council.
TOMORROW: The Universi-
ty's Role in Student Housing.

By JOHN CRUMB, JR.
"Peer Gynt" is too long (three
hours), too didactic, and asks for
too many scene changes to be good
theatre. Henrik Ibsen said he
wrote the play to be read, not
produced. But again the University
Players' ambition led them to pio-
neer new paths for educational
theatre, sail uncharted and un-
choreographed seas of forbidden
repertoire.
The cuts made by the new Paul
Green translation almost founder
the U.P. boat (for a second time).
While Mr. Green saw fit to' retain
the preachy Onion scene, where
Peer Gynt peels an onion to find
that, like himself, it's hollow in
the middle, he cut out the beauti-
fully whimsical encounter with the
Strange Passenger.
While he kept the graveyard
sermon in the last act, he made it
pointless by cutting out the corpse,
the Youth who cut off his finger
to avoid the draft.
This Youth was an indirect con-
trast to Peer Gynt himself. For
the Youth, ostracized for a cow-
ard, took to the hills, got himself
a family, and lived till the grave-
yard scene a completely self-ef-
facing life. Gynt lived entirely for
himself.

"Peer Gynt" is more valued as
fantasy than philosophy. Joel
Kramer as the Troll King was
grotesquely cute. - None of the
Trolls were terrifying, as Ibsen
probably intended. The whole play
is a banal expression of tragic the-
atre, despite the capacities of the
translator. The audience laughed
at the Trolls last night.
The production as a whole was
out of tune with the romantic feel-
ing in Ibsen's work. Music and
sound effects consisted of that
same raspy, linear kind that goes
along with a Brecht production.
The three-piece band that played
for the wedding lacked both vol-
ume or the spontanaiety to con-
tribtue to the festive feeling of the
wedding or the Arab scene.
The crowd scenes lacked ani-
mation: the pace was too slow,
hence there was a feeling that the
actors, like the musicians, were
reciting lines, not understanding
them.
The problem of frequent scene
changes was no problem: scene
changes were eliminated entirely.
The whole was left up to the imag-
ination of the audience, lighting,
and the blurry projections on the
screen backstage. The Boyg scene
was a terrifying success, accom-

plished with the lighting, and
communicated some of what Ibsen
actually meant the Boyg to be.
The shipwreck scene was cut en-
tirely. But the set itself was beau-
tifull yconceived, and did not ob-
trude on the play.
Julie Lacy was unfortunately
cast as Solveig, Peer's constant,
saving woman. While Miss Lacy
can play affected and aged women
beautifully, her voice, her accent,
made her an unconvincing 16 year
old.
Robert E. McGill had the spirit
of Peer Gynt, though his acting
was too consciously affected, es-
pecially in the fourth act. As a
successful, self-centered s l a v e
trader, Mr. McGill could have
been more contemptuous of his
idolators. Maybe a little more
crass.
The Greenclad Woman (Laura
Seager) and Mads Moen (Fritz
Lyon) who stole the show.
Who could appear more grossly
sensuous than the Troll princess as
she wreathed in the caress of
Peer or groveled at the base of the
thorne of the Mountain King dur-
ing Peer's temptation?
And Fritz Lyon was a perfect
idiot on stage. He must be a
natural.

417,
E. Liberty

iwwmmm wwwwwmwwwwmwui winmmmmmmmmmwwwmmmnminmmmm
I ,I
Tonight7at7and
aI
1 A
# 1
* ALEC GUINESS

Dennis Price

Joan Greenwood

Valerie Hobson
]KIND HEARTS
AND CORONETS :

.A

(411:1

SHOWN AT 1:00
3:00-5:00-7:00 & 9:05

MUSIC SHOP

"BIGGEST, NOISIEST, NAUGHTIST CONTENDER
IN THE NEY SPY STAKES!"-TIME MAG.
MATT HELM SHOOTS THE WORKS!

Phone
662-0675

-A - (Continued from Page 1)
fulfill all distribution requirements.
However, with new lighter distri-
bution requirements coming into
effect, students may feel easier
about that and join the program:
Shawrioted.
Sophomores were told that if
they waited to join the program
they would have to write out a
program for their last two years
and. a statement of their educa-
I cross
I A
THURSDAY, APRIL 7
and 9 p. m.-Cinema Guild will
preseit "Kind Hearts and Coro-
nets" in the Architecture Aud.
8 ~#ln.- The University Players.
will present Henrik Ibsen's "Peer
Gynt" in1 Trueblood Aud.
8 p.m.-The' Institute of Public
Administration will present a
seminar by Prof. D. N. Chester of
Oxford speaking on "An Appraisal
of the British Civil Service" in
Rackham Assembly Hall.
FRIDAY, APRIL 8
7 and 9 p.m.-Cinema Guild will
present "Kind Hearts and Coro-
nets" in the Architecture Aud.
8 p.m,-The. University Players
will present Henrik Ibsen's "Peer
Gynt" in Trueblood Aud.
8:30 p.M.-The Michigan Con-
sort of Voices, Viols, and Histor-
ical Instruments will present a
public concert conducted by Prof.
Robert A. Warner in Rackham
Lecture .Hall.

tional goals. Some sophomores who
did not join felt unable to write
out a complete program. There
seemed to be some doubt as to
how much was needed.
Many students applauded the
program as a step in the right
direction, but said they did not
want to bother with writing out
the forms. Some felt they have
enough freedom without it, saying
'they just see their counselor to
have him sign their election cards.
"I walk in; I walk out," is one
student's description of pre-clas-
sification.'
Students in the program ex-
plained that they joined because
they feel they do not need a coun-
selor's help; they know if they
have problems they can always see
a counselor, but under the option-
al plan they do not have to.
The final decision as 'to whether
or not a student is allowed into
the program is made by his coun-
selor. Shaw pointed out that while
some counselors have several stu-
dents in the program, others have,
none.
Shaw said that although some
counselors may be philosophically
against more freedom, he doubts
they are holding their students
back from

I

i

A'

0

4-~m

DIAL
8-6416

Get Bluebooks
at
Student
Book Service

NEXT WEEK

e

KISS ME, KATE

I

F----------------------- ----------- !
STUDENTS!
how adventuresome
a .youQ? Come with us and discover the I
Student's world of East and West I
Europe-the lure of unknown Africa
Travel with -the fascinating Middle East!
STUDENTS INTERNATIONAL
A TRAVEL CENTER FOR YOUTH OF ALL NATIONS
L 203 North Wabash Avenue . Chicago, Illinois 60601
------------"--------------------------------
WOULD YOU BELIEVE
that we rent TV
for only pennies per day ?

I

I

Academy Award Nominee
"ONE OF
THlE YEAR'
10 BEST!
The most touching
picture of the year!"
-N. Y. Post
" ****A film
to be cherished!"
- N.Y. Daily News
"Tremendous
emotional appeal!"
-N.Y. Herald Tribune
"Compelling
drama!"
-N.Y. Journal
American '"

I

4

ii

IF YOU LIKE
SEX
MURDER
HORROR
DON'T MISS
with
TONY PERKINS
Fri., Sat., and Sun.
7 and 9 P.M.

METRO-GOLDWYN-MAYER
presents
THE PANDRO S. BERMAN-
GUY GREEN PRODUCTION
ac
03k Luc

NEJAC TV RENTALS
662-4571
HAVE A FEW HOURS A WEEK?
WANT TO HELP SCHOOL CHILDREN?
Interested in Volunteer Community Work?
THE TUTORIAL PROJECT
NEEDS ADVISORS
APPLY NOW FOR NEXT FALL-
Assist tutors working with culturally separated children.
663-8670 for further information

Aud. A

50c

I

I

ID required
CINEMA
II

starring
SIDNEY_
POTTIER an

SHELLEY
WINTERS

I

10

rELIZABEIH HARTMAN

I

°,

Ann Arbor Branch
PRESENTS:
COCEPT EAST

AMERICAN CIVIL
LIBERTIES UNION
HAROLD PINTER'S
"THE CARETAKER"

I

IFN 117 Ir Im /1\\ T 7

I l

i l I

I

I

I

Back to Top

© 2017 Regents of the University of Michigan