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April 06, 1966 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-04-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGETWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

tflE.rN'FSDAv APUITT. t.14

S 3 TiiT E I C I G A D I L

rr .,i c.airt x, r r L1L b, lybti

Animal Lover Disney Offers
Colorful, Misanthropic 'Bambi'

Dance Theatre Features Wide
Array of Workshops, Classes

By BETSY COHN
and JAMES SCHUTZE
Walt. Disney has an obvious
disdain for people (real and cel-
luloid) this tendency is given
colorful animation in "Bambi,'
his heroic cartoon creation, now
rerunning at the Michigan Thea-
tre.
It is dawn in the Hungry Hoof
Forest of Northern Montana;
Buttercup, Thumper, Sparrow,
Flower, Owl, Winnie the Pooh, and
Cheryl have all gathered about
the thicket where a touching pri-
maeval nativity has taken place.
Bambi, son of Doe and Buck, has
been born the Prince of the
Forest.
The animeds rejoice and wel-
come the spotted heir to: King
Buck's rock, and 'laugh as they
witness his first blundering steps.
It is spring and the forest is
thriving with tuliferous, tulips,
bubbling bumble bees and squeal-
ing skunks.
Unfortunately, this blissful and
lively Crayola scene has to be
brutally shattered by the director's
misaithi'opism.

CHICAGO PUBLIC SCHOOLS
will hove a representative on campus
THURSDAY, APRIL 7
For information about certification,
procedures and teaching opportunities,
arrange for appointment at
UNIVERSITY PLACEMENT OFFICE

Man appears in the forest, but
only as a shotgun blast. Disney's
distraught imagination b r i n g s
about the murder of Queen Doe,
shot down by merciless hunters.
She leaves an orphaned and
frightened Bambi behind who is
soon after, taken under the pro-
tective antler of his father, the
deer King.
Man's second appearance brings
with it a disastrous forest fire
which burns the wild lives and
their homes to the ground.
The movie's strongest attraction
is the vocalization of the support-
ing characters. The voice . of
Thumper, the rabbit, has the
clear, resonating cherubic sound
of a highly matured four year old.
King Deer, on the, other hand,
exercises a well developed larynx
which effectively portrays a bom-
bast old Buck while his graceful
young wife has a soothing tone
not unlike Jackie Kennedy's oc-
casional whispers.
Technicolor Misanthropy
Disney's dislike for humankind,
has technicolored most of the work

he has ever produced. He is well
known for the subordination of
human beings to chipmunks, mice
and other heroes of his invention.
"Bambi" and the accompanying
short "A Country Coyote Goes to
the City" are extreme examples of
Disneyness.
The "Coyote" epic, unlike
"Bambi," shows real people but
puts them in an absurd and un-
favorable light. A buffoonish
truckdriver (whose most signifi-
cant action is scratching himself),
a haggard housewife who dotes on
her languid great dane and cow-
ardly firemen who choke at the
smell of smoke: these are man-
kind's representatives to Disney-
land.
It is difficult to predict how
-today's juvenile world will respond
to Disney's hierarchy of beings.
One little girl was seen giving her
father a violent kick after leaving
the theatre.
This movie.is recommended.to
adults who want to be kicked by
their children and to children who
want to become cartoons.

By MARCIA WICK
Perhaps unknown to many stu-
dents are the varied offerings of
the Ann Arbor Dance Theatre.
Specializing in experimental and
improvisational modern dance,
this independent group provides an
intensive program of classes and
workshops, as well as professional
performances.
On Thursday, April 14, Dance
Theatre will sponsor a final pre-
sentation in its spring series of
dance workshops, which consist of
informal performances of modern
dance works choreographed by
local dancers.
The final workshop will be com-
posed of two parts: the first will
be a problem in improvisation set
by Ingo Seidler, associate profes-
sor of German at the University,
with the assistance of Mrs. Taya
Bergmann. The second improvisa-
tional piece will be a collaboration
on the part of Miss Linda Ellis
and Russell Peck, '66SM. The
dance will be set to a background
of music composed by Peck, who
will teach a course in contempor-

ary music at next semester's Free
University.
In addition to the Thursday
evening workshops, the group also
offers an exceptional program of
dance classes taught by Dance
Theatre members and sponsored
in cooperation with the Ann Arbor
Recreation Department. While the
classes are directed specifically
toward Dance Theatre partici-
pants, they are open to anyone
who is interested in attending.
Summer Program
During the school year Dance
Theatre offers one evening class
a week, while the summer program
is usually more intensive, with
three classes a week. Although
the classes are usually taught by
members of the Dance Theatre
Board of Directors, the position
of instructor is open to non-
affiliated, qualified dance teach-
ers.
Dance Theatre has no clearly
defined membership as such. In-
stead the "members" are those
who participate in the Dance
Theatre productions as choreo-
graphers and dancers. Mrs. Ann
Young, one of the group's direc-
tors, stresses that "we try to re-
main a repertory group as much as
possible, but this is difficult since
the personnel is quite transitory."
The Dance Theatre is financed
almost completely by community
contributions. While the Recrea-
tion Department provides the
group with a theater and rehear-
sal space, all concert expenses are
taken care of through independent
contributions. Mrs. Young termed
community support of Dance
Theatre "excellent."
The group is guided by a Board
of Directors who also serve as
choreographers for the works per-
formed each year. Each of the
choreographers is responsible for
selecting her own work to be per-
formed in an Annual Concert, as
well as choosing a cast of dancers,

and staging and producing the
work.
The Annual Concert is the high-
light of the cumulative efforts of
Dance Theatre. This year the con-
cert was given in late January
and featured three premier works
choreographed by company mem-
bers. These works, along with most
of the dances performed by the
company, are strictly contempor-
ary peices with an emphasis upon
experimental and improvisational
modern dance. This gives the com-
pany members a chance to express
their own choreography on stage.
Next fall will mark the 'fourth
anniversary of Dance Theatre.
Membership in Dance Theatre is
open to any trained dancer of the
community, and Mrs. Young
stresses that University students
are welcomed as participants.
I-

HAVE A FEW HOURS A WEEK?
WANT TO HELP SCHOOL CHILDREN?
Interested in Volunteer Community Work?
THE TUTORIAL PROJECT
NEEDS ADVISORS
APPLY NOW FOR NEXT FALL-
Assist tutors working with culturally separated children.
663-8670 for further information

0

PRIVATE APARTMENTS:
Student Housing: A Crucial Problem

(Continued from Page 1) 1
property and builds it to last at
least in the vicinity of 50 years.
Butt:theepreferred form of mul-
DAILY OFFICIAL
t JLLETI'N
The Daily Offlai .Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The
Michfgan Dally::assumes, no editor-
ial responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN formh to
Room 3519 Administration Bldg. be-
fore: 2 p.m. of the, day preceding
publication, and by 2 prm. Friday
for ,Sa1urday ..and Sunday. General
Notices may be published a maxi-
mum of two times on request; Day
Calendar, Stems -appear once only
Student organiration notices are not
accepted for publication.
WEDNESDAY, APRIL 6
Day .Calend ar
Real Estate Clinic-MV4ichigan Union,
7:45' a.mn.
Management Development Seminar-
"The Disciplinary Process and Griev-
ance Handling": Rackham Bldg., 8:30
Institute. of Labor and Industrial Re-
latiolls Setinar-"The scientific Revo~to-
autiO ntheChanging American So-
ciety"' Michigan Union, 9 ar.m:,
Office. of Religious Affairs, Book. Dis-
cussion - Sarah R. Mahler, "Writers
and Folitics' and "Back to atanga"
by Conr Cruise: O'Brien: 2417 Mason
Hall, 12 nm:
Hopwood Lecture- Peter Taylor. nov-
elist and. short story writer, "That
Cloistered Jazz": Rackham Lecture Hall,
8 pm..
Dept of Speech University Players.
Performance--"Peer Gynt" by Henrik
Ibsen: Trueblood Aud., 8 p.m.
Schoolof iMusie Concert-University
of Michigan Choir'and Chamber Or-
chestra,-Maynard Klein, conductor: Hill
Aud., :0 .p .m. .
Center: for Programmed Learning for
Business:Seminar--"Management of Be-
havior Change": Michigan Union, 8:30.
a.m.
5-Hour:Special Topics in Chemistry-
8th Series: Dr. H. C. Griffin, U. of M.,
"Sytematics of Nuclear Properties:
Simple Nuclear Models," on Wed., April
6, at 8 pm., Room 1300 Chemistry Bldg.
This is the tbr'd talk of the series.
Dept. of Zoology Seminar - T. L.
Jahn, University of California at Los
(Continued on Page 7)
PH.483-4680
E Ocza cARn ENTER ROAD
FRE CAR .HEATERS
f :OPENSAT I6:3O P.M.
NOW SHOWING

tiple construction in Ann Arbor is
what Daniels calls the "schlock"
-a yiddish term roughly equiv-
alent to "ersatz," shoddy or shop-
worn.
According to Daniels and several
other local sources, the "schlock"'
is usually financed by either an'
out-of-town investor or an out-of-
town bank or life insurance agen-
cy. Almost all are built for a quick
profit, he explains.
"The schlock builder builds with'
the intention of selling in the fifth
to eleventh year of ownership to
realize maximum profit," explains
Daniels.
."Inflation and tax positioning (a
drop in depreciation write-off in-
creases taxes to a point where it
is advantageous to sell) determines
when the property is sold," says
Daniels.
"The sole concern of these in-'
vestors is to maximize profit with
little or no concern for general
public interest such as esthetic in-
terests, the character of the com-
munity, the balance of housing in-
ventory or the livability of hous-
ing supply to its residents."
The typical apartment has 80C
square feet divided into two bed-.
rooms for four men, with bath,
living room, kitchenette and a
small porch.
"Probably more than half of
the multiple constructiOn in Ann
Arbor is of this variety," says Dan-
iels. "Far too little is of the long
range type."
How much money are the devel-
opers making? The answer varies
widely. According to local banking
officials, the average national yield
on real estate is 10 to 12 per cent
per year on investment. One lo-
cal management agency claims
that the return ,here is only 8
per cent, while some student
groups claim that profits are up-
wards of 35 per cent.
Daniels,. however, says he as-
sumes that "the average annual
.yield on multiple apartment in-

vestment in Ann Arbor is 18 per
cent. The typical 'schlock' yield is
upwards of 20 per cent." These
figures are more than 50 per cent
higher than the national average
of 10 per cent. Daniels' estimates
come within one or two per cent
of private estimates of other de-
velopers and local bankers.
The return on the soundly built
multiple unit is in the vicinity of
14 to 15 per cent a year, accord-
ing to Daniels.
Daniels is building a masonry1
unit at the present time and says,
"It is very difficult to find an in-;
vestor willing to put his money
into an Ann Arbor apartment in-
vestment that promises less than
a 15 per cent yield.
"When I tell my friends in the
business that I am only going to,
make about a 15 per cent return;
on my investment they all stare
at me and ask sort of quizzically-
'What's the matter with you, is
there something wrong'?"
The multiple apartment con-
struction on central campus is
quickly swalloping up many of
the old properties.
A popular form of off campus
housing is the private house. One
landlord who purchased an.$18,-.
000 home for $1500' down seven
years ago now estimates hisan-
nual return at about $630-or a 42
per cent return on his investment.
Ironically, while the profit
seems high, his five tenants pay
a surprisingly-low $45 a month for
their four bedroom house with
kitchen;, living room, study, din-
ing room, air conditioning and a
garage.
The landlord has been ap-
proached about selling his prop-

erty by a developer interested in
constructing a multiple apartment.
But at least four lots are needed
and since the landlord is asking
$18,000 for his house, the multi-
ple construction is still a few years
off.
Ann Arbor Councilman Robert
C. Weeks says that this "current
mode for the developer is to buy
up parcels of land to build a cash
register multiple, and then sell it
and buy more and more land tc
build a bigger layout with more
cash register multiples, . . . encour-
ages many landlords to become
avaricious. They make so much
money in a few years they aren't
concerned about quality."
Weeks is worried about the mul-
tiple developments "turning the
central campus into a dense, noisy
and congested area - a gilded
slum." His sentiments are shared
by Mrs. Kraker of the Universi-
ty's off-campus housing office,
who says, "The way most of those
four man apartments are designed
I don't see how the students can
stand each other after the first
week."
TOMORROW: The landlords,
the critics and the city.

F."

U

Vv

8-6416
ENDS TONIGHT

I

I

I

FEDERICO FELLINI
OIFTHE
GIULETTA MASINA
SANDRA MILO
VSYLA KOSCINA
In Technicolor.
THURSDAY
ACADEMY AWARD
NOMINEE
"A PATCH

I

.

..

Ann Arbor Branch

AMERICAN CIVIL
LIBERTIES UNION

NEXT WEEK!
KISS ME, KATE

PRESENTS:

CONCEPT EAST
THEATRE CO.

HAROLD PINTER'S
"THE CARETAKER"
LYDIA MENDELSSOHN THEATRE

0

OF BLUE"

I

Mai

I

F R I., SAT., SU N.-APR I L 22, 23, 24
TICKETS: $4.10,3.30,2.20, 1.75

THE ONCE GROUP PRESENTS

DIAL 5-6290

BOB MARSHALL'S BOOK SHOP
NO 3-5624 OR 764-1801

211 S. STATE

1

A BENEFIT PERFORMANCE FOR A WORLD TOUR
EMI-OFF

IF YOU LIKE

SEX

THEATER-MUSIC-DANCE-EVENTS

I

MURDER
HORROR-
DON'T MISS
PSYCHO
with
TONY PERKINS
Fri., Sat., and Sun.
7 and 9 P.M.

" ORANGE DESSERT " SOFT CENTERS
" LECTURES * KITTYHAWK

one huge program of premieres

SHOWS AT 1, 3, 5, 7 & 9 P.M.
FUN! MUSIC! DRAMA!
An exciting.
Story f
to thrill.'.
NVEW
.TECt4ICOWW8'
5
a o HAPPY
From the Story by FELIX SALTEN HIVS
® Wait Disney Productions, Inc:
Re*released by BUENA VISTA Distribution Co., no.
NEXT
"THE SINGING NUN"

Ann Arbor Chamber Soioists
WELCOME YOU TO THEIR LAST CONCERT
OF THE SEMESTER AT

I _

The

I

' E A R K

I

4

SATURDAY, APRIL 9

8:30 P.M.

And, we are proud to present
an exhibit of photographs by H. Ramsey Fowler

ANN ARBOR HIGH SCHOOL AUDITORIUM
601 West Stadium Blvd.

I.

TICKETS:

$2.00 on sale at

FRIDAY
APRIL 8

8:30-12:30 P.M.
$1.00 ADMISION

Bob Marshalls Bookshop and Discount Records
and at the door

1421 HILL STREET

Aud. A
1D required

50c

CINEMA

MARY ASHLEY-CAROLINE COHEN
JOSEPH WEHRER-ROBERT ASHLEY
HAROLD BORKIN-GEORGE MANUPELLI
GORDON MUMMA-ANN BORKIN
ANNE WEHRER-AND OTHERS

I

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,,n - 'ECI~IIaJL'JPR
Shown at 9:25 Only
OPEN EVERY NITE

GET YOUR DATE

11

i

for

fil

...

The University of Michigan
Gilbert and Sullivan Society
KASS MEETING

K(ISS MF4 KA"T-E'

Unique opportunity for international summer living

at the FRIEND'S CENTER

International Co-op

Presented by ANN ARBOR CIVIC THEATRE
N ext week-Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre-April 13-17

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