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April 03, 1966 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1966-04-03

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY. APREL 3, 1966

PAGE TWO THE MICHIGAN DAILY SUNDAY. APRiL 3,1966

INTERNATIONAL CENTER
PROGRAM COUNCIL
MASS MEETING
Tues., April 5 at 8:00 P.M.
International Center
ALL STUDENTS INVITED

Students, Faculty Praise Caliber of 'U' Law School

(Continued from Page 1)
with other institutions.
An;important criterion of a good
faculty is its publication. "Every-
one on the faculty has some kind
of project of significance to the
profession, since they are very in-
terested in trying to 'improve it,"
Joiner said.
Art Dulemba, '67L, editor of the
Law School newspaper Res Ges-
tae, lauded the faculty for "ex-
emplifying the type of careful,
analytic, detailed aproach to which
the law student must accustom
himself."
Direct student-faculty interac-
tion is varied and informal. Join-
er explained that about 40 pro-
fessors act as counselors for the
1100 students even though the
faculty members are not hired
specifically for that purpose.
This means that there is ap-
proximately one counselor for
every 25 students.

There is also non-academic in-
teraction through various groups
such as the Legal Aid Clinic, Case
Club and Law Review. Foreign
language luncheons and beer par-t
ties given by professors for theirE
students are additional and wel-
comed means of communication.
Chris Cohen '67, the newly3
elected president of the Law
School's Board of Directors, saidt
that the student-faculty relation-
ship is quite good but could be im-
proved further. "Initiative shouldj
be taken by the students in in-
creasing contacts with faculty
members," Cohen said.
Dean Joiner emphasized thatj
the La wShcool is very concerneed
with maintaining the flow of in-
formation between the students1
and professors, for this is "an im-
portant part of the learning pro-
cess."
As Joel Strauss, '67, a Camp-
bell Competition quarter finalist,
suggests, the academic life is also
fashioned by the caliber of the
students. It was generally agreed,
that the ability and intelligence of,
the students at the Law School
was excellent.
"Competition is good because
you have a group of good guys.
Grades are important to prospec-
tive employers, so there is suffic-
ient pressure," said Devin Beat-
tie '66, past Vice-president of the
Board of Directors of the Law
School.
Prof. Gray described a sharp
rise in the quality of students ap-
plying to the Law School. The
University takes only 350 from a
group of over 2,000 applicants.
"Last year the median student
in the Law School Administration

Test was in the top 90% of all plant. "The Law School has en-
applicants. Not more than about joyed a tremendous set up physi-
3% of the freshmen failed last cally," according to Beattie. This
year because our criterion for same sentiment was echoed by al-
choosing them was so high," Join- most all other faculty members
er said, and students interviewed. They

Favorable Balance
The professors interviewed com-
mented on the favorable balance
between in and out-of-state stu-
dents. Joiner explained that the
Law School is not required to ac-
cept a certain number of students
from Michigan, but that the ad-
ministration is conscious of the
school's responsibility to the state.
He added that the state bene-
fits from a large number of out-
of-state students in two ways.
These students spend money in
the state. Even more important,
the Law School brings in bright
people to increase the brain power
of the state if they stay in Mich-
igan.
University Law School grad-
uates are in high demand from
law firms all over the country,
Joiner added. Last year 209 rep-
resentatives from law firms and
the government interviewed stu-
dents at the Law School. Almost
3,000 interviews wree held; the
number has quadrupled in the
last ten years.
A common complaint of the
student body is that classes are
too large. In the freshmen class
of 350 to 380, there are at least
four sections. About 60 start out
in summer school, which makes
one additional section. There are
thus about 80 to 100 students per
section.
Physical Plant
Another reason for the Law
School's excellence is its physical

generally felt that the Law Quad
provided the best living accomo-
dations available either on or off
campus.
Numerous advantages were cit-
ed. Some emphasized the values
of maid service, while others
stressed the compactness of the
quad.
Strauss pointed out that having
living facilities, classes and the
library in the same area creates an
atmosphere which is very con-
ducive to study.
"The Law Squad is very smiliar
to a residential college because
about one-third of the students
live in the same block as the pro-
fessors's offices," Chris Cohen
said.
There are some problems with
the quad, however. Jim Cohen '67,
member of the Law Review, said
that he did not like living in the
quad because it is noisy, has small
rooms which lack private bath-
rooms, and has no carpeting in
the halls.
The main complaint of Bob Mc-
Bain '67, a married student was
that the qu a d discriminated
against married couples and girls.
Library
Another physical, advantage of
the Law School is its excellent li-
brary. Professor Gray called it
"one of the finest in the country,"
and he ranked it about fifth larg-
est in terms of sources.
However, Gray commented that
the library will probably have to

expanded into an open stack pro-
gram in order to make books
more accessible to students due to
the increasing number of semin-
ars.
Several students complainedl
that the lighting in the library is
very, poor, but efforts are being
made to correct this problem.
Kamisar gave a sample list of
the varied aspects of the school
now under examination. The
Law School examines the faculty
and curriculum, admissions pro-
cedures, communication to pre-
law students, improvement of sec-
retarial and librarial services (in-
cluding the possibility of a separ-
ate faculty library for popular
books), the Law Quad notes, the
Law School Bulletin, bulletin
and messenger services.
Beattie felt that the intense
academic pressure in the first year
has been reduced by a change in
curriculum. For example, proper-
ty and contracts used to be an
eight-hour course; it has been re-
duced to six hours.
"There has been a rapid ex-
pansion of the curriculum over
the past ten years," Gray said.
For instance, many courses in the
field of comparative and interna-
tional law have been added. The
University probably has more
variety in this area that Yale or
Harvard.
This fall the Law School will
initiate a program to combat the

problem of large classes. Every
freshman will have one class in a
small group of 20 to 25 students
so that he will have close contact
with the faculty in his first year.
Joiner spoke of the need for a
student apartment development
which could become a part of the
Law Quad in order to integrate
married students into the social
structure. This problem is under-
going analysis.
Eric Reif '67, newly elected Vice-
president of the Board of Direc-
tors, described a plan for major
renovation of the Law Quad in
which heating and plumbing
would be up-dated.
Chris Cohen said that the stu-
dents are also trying to work to-
ward the adoption of a course
evaluation system.
Prof. Roy Steinheimer summed
up the general attitude of the Law
School with the following words:
"The Law School has to always
be testing itself to see if it is do-
ing the best job it. can."
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4

COLLEGE EXPERIMENT:
Pass-Fail System Attempted

r1

It

Collegiate Press Service
Nearly three-quarters of Prince-
ton University's undergraduates
have elected to use the school's
new pass-fail option-a system un-
der which they take one course for
which they are not graded but
receive a "pass" or "fail."
The Princeton faculty said that
in establishing the option they
hoped to broaden the range of
course choices for undergraduates.
More than 200 courses, ranging
from modern European painting to
digital computer theory, are being
taken on an ungraded basis by
2,300 students.
A breakdown by classes revealed
that 78 per cent of the seniors, 77
per cent of the juniors, and 79
per cent of the sophomores elected
to use the option while 65 per cent
of the freshmen participated in.

most frequently are in the arts
and literature, ithe survey shows.
The art and archeology depart-
ment, one of the smallest at
Princeton with only 12 depart-1
mental majors this year, currently
has more students taking courses
with the pass-fail option than any
other.
A student may take any course
on a pass-fail basis except one in
his major department.
The Princeton experiment is
one of a number now underway.
The California Institute of
Technology faculty voted last fall
to drop grades in freshman courses
to make the transition between

high school and college smoother.
Freshman level courses are now
evaluated on a pass-fail basis.
A similar pass-fail system for
first and second year students is
being designed at Washington
University in St. Louis.
"Intense concentration on mak-
ing grades is a dispiriting factor
that limits the student's chance to
get an education," explained Dean
Robert R. Palmer when he an-
nounced the study of the system.
Dean Palmer felt grades would
have to be continued in upper
division work since they have be-
come a standard for admission to
graduate and professional schools.

GYNiF

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Version by Paul Green
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