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April 02, 1966 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-04-02

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SATURDAY, APRIL 2, 1966

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

VAC Cn

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THE JUNIOR CIRCUIT
by Bob McFarlande
EDITOR'S NOTE- When the juniors became acting senior
editors, the sophomores decided they had stepped up a notch too.
Giving in to their desires for flamboyant expression, we offer
the new junior column. Bob McFarland is first to speak out-C.V.
A cheering throng of 80,000 singing "Hail to the Victors" on a fall
afternoon, athletic geniuses like Fielding H. Yost and Fritz Crisler,
dusty trophies now relegated to obscurity in dark exhibition cases, and
the crumbling concrete of the old Ferry Field stands all contribute
to Michigan tradition.
Ever since 1878 when Charles Gayley's Wolverine gridders chalked
up their first victory over Racine, a wealth of athletic tradition has
flowed Into the Ann Arbor coffers, and no one found it necessary to
worry' about where the next bit was coming from.
The Air Force Academy was in a little different situation when
they moved into Colorado Springs in August, 1958. Their history had
trouble filling a large matchbook, and what made matters worse,
the Air Force rivals at West Point and Annapolis had a big head
start In the area.
Less than eight years later, the Academy planners have proved
that something more than time goes Into making a tradition. Where
there's a will, there's a way, and all that.
All it takes is the creativity of a Leonardo da Vinci and the
unlimited resources of the United States government to trans-
form an expanse of 17,900 acres of uninhabited ranch lands into
a military showpiece filled with gleaming edifices of glass, alumi-
num, steel, and white marble.
Beautiful? Beyond a doubt. But some familiar visitors to the
Academy leave the impression that the mountains to the west and
the sweeping plains to the east remind them more of a Devil's Island
than a picturesque institution of higher learning.
Slogans also augment tradition. In three foot high letters engraved
in marble, ,the words, "Bring Me Men," vaguely reminiscent of the
"Uncle Sam Needs You" posters of an earlier period, greet visitors as
they climb the ramp leading into the Cadet Area. Beneath the statue
of a falcon, the Academy masept, another motto reminds the cadets
that' "man's flight through life is sustained by the power of his
knowledge." . .
They didn't have much to build on in the way of athletics, but
what was lacking in the way of tradition was compensated for by
quantity.. The guardians 'of our nation's airways couldn't boast of a
Glenn Davis or Doc Blanchard (Blanchard, by the way, holds the
position of, assistant athletic director at the Academy). Nothing pre-
vented them from laying out 22 football fields, however. Of course,
these also double for soccer, lacrosse, etc. A 71-yard swimming pool
(Michigan's is 25 yards) is another impressive part of the athletic
plant, the monstrosity divided into three sections by two electronically
movable bulkheads.
An economically-minded Congressman must have trimmed the
appropriations somewhat for basketball because the arena is easily
mistakable for a high school gym. Plans have already been drawn
up for a new field house, housing both the Falcon cagers and
icers, though.
The Falcon athletic department is justifiably proud of the king-
dom they rule over. Jim Bowman, a former Wolverine gridder and
now freshman football coach at the Academy, began a conversation
with this reporter last week at the Cadet Gymnasium Pool with the
question, "Well, what do you think of the setup we've got here?"
Bowman played linebacker with -the Ron Kramer-Terry Barr group,
and reminisced a while about Doc Losh and the days when the Air
Force Academy was just an idea.
Bowman has another job besides that of frosh grid coach. He is
listed in the catalog as chief of candidate counseling. Don't let the
misnomer fool you. Chief of candidate counseling is only another ex-
pression of the budding Air Force Academy tradition, and actually
means head recruiter, although it takes a while to reason it out.
4 The basement of the Cadet Gymnasium is filled with row after
row of lockers. Each member of the cadet wing is required to take
part in ititramural activity twice a week, unless he participates in
intercollegiate, athletics, so the number can't be questioned. One man,
one locker. Someone thought it would look nice to sprinkle signs
around the locker rooms, denoting "SQUADRON 11, SQUADRON 5,
SQUADRON 8 . . ." One official remarked that the signs are only
up "to impress the visitors." The football dressing room is labeled
"SQUADRON 17."
Security arrangements for the press box are very military,
too. When I arrived at the NCAA swimming meet last Thursday
night, the final event of the night was in process. The manager of
the ticket booth, unable to find my press pass, told me to go right
up to the press box and see Captain Peck, sports publicity director.
I confidently walked into the press box, only to be met by a
scowling Lieutenant Colonel, who, after listening to my explanation,
informed me that he heard stories like that all the time. "If you want
to see Peck," he growled, "you'll have to call him from the ticket
office downlstairs." Downstairs I trudged.
Explaining my predicament to the ticket manager, I found a
sympathetic ear. An assistant was given the task of getting me into
the press box, and up we went again. The ticket manager's assistant
1. had little better luck with the Lieutenant Colonel than I did, and once
again, we were booted out of the box. As we walked downstairs, he
muttered, "If I'd known the old Colonel was up there, we would have
snuck in the back way." I complimented him on the tight security, but
it didn't seem to cheer him up.'

To my relief, the ticket manager had found my pass, and I
marched triumphantly into the press facilities. The Colonel, with
a sly smirk, remarked, "You finally found a pass, huh?" I felt
like IChad Just made my way over the Berlin wall.
Fortunately, the Lieutenant Colonel wasn't representative of the
average Air Force officer at the Academy, most of them going out of
the way to be cordial to their guests.
The cadets manage to get in some fun in the midst of the military
atmosphere. As the cadets marched in formation to dinner on Satur-
day night, they were accompanied by the refrain from "Batman"
which some earstwhile First Classmen were blaring over the main PA
system.
This is instant tradition, after eight years. Maybe, Wolverine
publicity director Les Etter would like a Lieutenant Colonel, too.

Banquet Fetes

1965-66 Cagers

By RICK STERN
Sentimentality teamed up with
mirth in the Union Ballroom last
night as the fourth annual Mich-
igan basketball banquet was held
with Jimmy Enright, Big Ten bas-
ketball official and sports writer
for Chicago's American, serving as
master of ceremonies.
Speakers included University
President Harlan Hatcher, Coach-
es Dave Strack, Jim Skala, and
Tom Jorgensen, as well as all sev-
en graduating Michigan seniors.
Rings were presented to each of

the seniors by the Michigan Club
of Ann Arbor. Special honors were
bestowed on Cazzie Russell, who
received a number of awards and
trophies from representatives of
various press associations and na-
tional magazines.
A life size portrait of Russell was
unveiled which may be placed in
the new University Events Build-
ing. State Legislatureeresolutions
honoring Russell and the team
were presented by Rep. Marvin
Esch.
The Ann Arbor Club presented
gifts to Jorgensen, and cited him

I

for his contributions to the Mich-
igan basketball program. They also
gave presents to the other coaches
and to team manager John Phil-
lips.
Several high school basketball
stars attended the banquet. Not-
able among these were Trenton
Gaines and Ken Booker, from
Long Beach, Calif.; Earl Higgins
'from Ann Arbor High; Ken John-
son from Anderson, Ind.;. Lamar
Thomas from Illinois state high
school champion Thornton; Ron
Beam from East Detroit; John
Rodwanski and Rudy Tomjona-

t

Board Retires CaZZie s Number

The Board in Control of Inter-
collegiate Athletics, in a meeting
yesterday afternoon, officially re-
tired Cazzie Russell's uniform
number 33 and also made official
the appointment of George Pomey
as freshman basketball coach.
In announcing the retirement of
Russell's number, Athletic Direc-
tor H. O. (Fritz) Crisler pointed
to the fact that "Russell is the
first Michigan basketball player
ever to be so honored. Previously
only such football greats as Tom
Harmon, Bennie Oosterbaan, and
Ron Kramer, and the Wistert
brothers had had their jerseys
retired."
Pomey replaces Tom Jorgensen
who served as'freshman coach for
six years. Pomey started at guard
on last year's Michigan team and
lettered three times in basketball.
Jorgensen's resignation, to accept
the head coaching job at Northern
Illinois, was accepted at the meet-

had never before "met out of ex-'
ecutive session," meaning that all
previous meetings had been closed.
He did not comment further on
the resolution.
Tom Weinberg, '67, student rep-
resentative to the Board, said the
Board was "vitally concerned with
communication and the problem of
dispensing information to the stu-
dents and faculty."
Indicating that a lengthy dis-
cussion in the area had taken
place at the Board meeting, Wein-
berg also said that he was "en-
Russell Thin

couraged that there is a genuine
interest in the area on the Board,"
adding that he felt that "some-
thing needs to and will be done in
the future.'
Clarifying the matter somewhat,
Weinberg said that the Board
could not and "definitely will not
operate under an entirely open
system at any time." Though no
specific action was taken at this
meeting, Weinberg indicated that
action might be taken at the
Board's next meeting over the
summer.-R.S.
dl in- Scoring;

vich from -Hatramck; and Rick
Bloodworth from Michigan state
champion Ferndale.
The Michigan band entertained
throughout the evening and auto-
graphed basketballs were given
away as door prizes.
Approximately 450 attended the
stag affair, at a cost of $10 per
person.
1966-67
Basketball Schedule
DECEMBER
1-Tennessee (A)
--Duke (A)
5--Houston (H)
7-Bowling Green (A)
10-Davidson(H)4
22-Ohio Univ. (H)
27-30--Los Angeles Classic
JANUARY
7-Northwestern (H)
10-Wisconsin (H)
14--Illinois (A)'
21-Michigan State (H)
23--Iowa (A)
FEBRUARY
4-Purdue (H)
U-Northwestern (A)
18-Ohio State (H)
20-Purdue (A)
5--Minnesota (A)
27-Indiana (H)
MARCH
4-WisconsinA(H)
6-Indiana (A)
11-Iowa (H)
Ph. 483-4680
EAtace On.CARPENTER ROAD
FREE IN-CAR HEATERS
BOX OFFICE OPEN 6:30
NOW SHOWING
JAMES MAUREEN
STEWART 0HARA
THE RARE
BREED
SHOWN AT
7:24 & 11:25
Plus-Shown at 9:25 Only
G' 'JC8R~Iq
"Fathep Goosele
Now Open Every Nite

I

Th .na i ~o hh,',
Gilbert and Sullivan Society
---fnnlUnce
Interviews for positions of:
DRAMATIC DIRECTOR (paid)
MUSICAL DIRECTOR (paid)
MONDAY, APRIL 4-7:30-MICHIGAN UNION
- ____________

THE THEOSOPHICAL SOCIETY
INVITES YOU TO IILAR
MR. SAMUEL H. WYLIE
LECTURER OF THE NATIONAL SOCIETY
"THE QUEST OF LIFE"
AT THE MICHIGAN LEAGUE
Michigan Room, 2nd Floor
3 P.M., SUNDAY, APRIL 3rd
ALL ARE WELCOME

-J

1w

Academic Squad Chosen

The 1966 cage season has re-
fused to accept: the role of "just
lingering memories" and the Mich-
igan squad is doing as much as
anybody to keep it alive.
Today Cazzie Russell will jour-
ney to Wichita where he will par-
ticipate in the North-South All-
Star game. Thursday night, Caz
took on the zany Harlem Globe-
trotters in Kalamazoo along with
fellow Wolverine stars Jim Myers,
Ollie Darden, and John Clawson
and a few other players from the
area.
Despite a 33-point performance
from Cazzie and a total of 39
points from his other Michigan
teammates, the Globetrotters sur-
vived by an 89-86 score.

It was also announced on
Thursday that Russell officially
finished third in the national
scoring race with an average of
30.8 points a game behind Dave
Schellhase of Purdue and Dave
Wagnon of Idaho State.
Also announced last week was
the Big Ten's academic team. John
Clawson and John Thompson, both
seniors in the School of Business
Administration, made the second
team. Chosen for the first squad
were Purdue's All-American Dave
Schellhase, his third time on the
academic roster, Jim Pitts of
Northwestern, a repeater from
last year, and. =teammate Jim
Burns, Bill Hosket of Ohio State,
and Michigan State's Bill Curtis.

CINEMA 1
presents
PART TWO
of the
H ITCHCOCK TRILOGY
VERTIGO
TECHNICOLOR
JAMES KIM
STEWART NOVAK
Saturday & Sunday 7 & 9:05 P.M.
ApriI2&63 Aud.A50'
ID Required
Program Information: 665-6756
Coming Tuesdqy: 'WAR OF THE WORLDS

11

END OF AN ERA

ing.
Crisler also announced that a
report on the University Events
Building was heard at the meet-
ing, and, that the building 'is now
scheduled for completion April
30, 1967. The previously announced
date of completion had been Jan.
1, 1967.
Crisler mentioned that the
Board had considered a resolution
put forward at the Student Gov-
ernment Council meeting held
Thursday night. The motion had
urged that portions of Board
meetings which "affect the stu-
dents and public" be open to the
general public.
He pointed out that the Board
Paddleball Action
Winds Up Today
The State /' of Michigan Open
Paddleball Tournament finals will
be held today in the IM Building.
The singles and doubles semifinals
will be held at 10 a.m.
Defending singles champion
Harry Detweiler will play Jack
Rashleigh in one semifinals match.
Tom Demassa will play RayHer-
mispon in the other sing les match.
Winners in the singles semi-
finals will play at 3 p.m. The
doubles finals will be held at 4 p.m.

II
HOLY WEEK
NOON DISCUSSION
APRIL 4-7
I ~
Mon: The LIFE of Christ
PROF. T. SMITH, Visiting Prof. of History I
iI.
Tues. Implications of the DEATH of Christ
PROF. OLIN BROWDER, Prof. of Law
Wed : The Meaning of R ESU R RECTION
DR. WALLACE TEED, Practicing Physician
Thurs: Considering ETERNITY
DR. ROBERT KLI NGER,
Dir. of the International Center
At the GU I LD HOUSE-802 Monroe
a cost lunch will be served
Call 662-5189 for Reservations
--sponsored by the Ecumenical Campus Ministers--

A '

The University Activities Center
announces

PETITIONING

for
Chairman and Co-Chairman

MUSKET '67

Petitions available in the Student Offices

/'1

SOD!
SHAVING EVERY
DA Y ISSUCH A
WHAT CAN SAVE
MY TENDER,
BEAUTIFUL SKIN?

POETRY READING
April 2nd
At the ARK
DONALD D. HALL
TONY STONEBURNER
STVE RVRONSON

M E AND '
SA VE YOU MONEY,
T00,0

If you've never used an electric shaver before, the Norelco T ip-

kw
:emirs

11

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