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April 02, 1966 - Image 6

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-04-02

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PAGE SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY, APRIL 2, 1966

PAGE SIX THE iWICHIGAN DAILY SATURDAY, APRIL 2,1968

TOMORROW, SUNDAY, APRIL 3
at 3:30 P.M.
THE HILLEL PLAYERS
' Present
THE IRON MAN of MICHIGAN"
a ane-act play written and directed by
Steven Coffman
starring Stephen Wyman
All Are Cordially Welcome 1429 Hill St.
B'Nai B'rith Hillel Foundation

Vertigo,' A Pleasant

By ELIZABETH WISSMAN
The presentation of "Vertigo"
by Cinema II as the second of an
Alfred Hitchock, triple-play is
ample proof that the man is more
than an interesting television pro-
file. Mr. Hitchcock makes good
movies. In an age when only the
most roubling sort of greatness
seems to prevail, there is some-
thing rather comforting about a
film which is no more and no less
than good. "Vertigo" is a slick pro-
duction, a professional organiza-
tion of plot and performers; which
is hardly likely to improve the
Human Condition, but it may, at
least, make one evening a bit more
pleasant.
There are some elements of the
movie which make it appear "dat-
ed" to a contemporary audience.
"Vertigo" illustrates a layman
fascination with psychiatry and
psychiatric terms, which was com-
mon over a decade ago: James
Stuart suffers from Acraphobia;
the word is rather prominently
dropped by Barbara Bel Geddes as
his patently understanding girl
friend. Vertigo, itself, is the sen-
sation of dizziness and physical
weaknes which inflicts Stuart each
time he dangles from a fifteen-
story ledge-a quite credible fail-
ing. As a result of this failing,
policeman Stuart has been forced
to resign his position. He simply
can not clamber from building to
building pursuing those goat-
footed felons. We see no more
investigation than this into the

INTERNATIONAL CENTER
PROGRAM COUNCIL
MASS MEETING
Tues., April 5 at 8:00 P.M.
International Center
ALL STUDENTS INVITED

I

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IF

nature of Stuart's psyche; the
vertigo has been introduced mere-
ly as a piece of plot mechanics.
However, the fact that Hitchcock
does not present a facile explana-
tion of the disease-a flash-back
for instance, to the time when
little Jimmy Stuart was punished
in a very high chair-saves the
film from psychological cheapness.
Once Stuart has been released
from his policeman's lot, the real
development of plot begins. He is
hired by a wealthy, exschool chum
to follow the man's wife. The
woman proves to be Kim Novak, a
lovely feline thing, whose only
real problem is the fact that she
believes she is a reincarnation.
Undaunted, Stuart pursues her
pell-mell from art museums to the
great Redwood Forests of Cali-
fornia. It is among these shelter-
ing pines, in fact, that Hitchcock
evokes one of his finest effects.
Kim stands by the crosssection of
a tree and points to a set of rings
demarking time a century before.
"Here I was born," she whispers,
"and here I died." Director Alfred
is at his best when delicately ex-
ploring the occult of Reincarna-
tion. The scene in which Stuart
stumbles over Kim at a museum,
garbed, coifed, and holding the
identical nosegay as the portrait
of her dead ancestor, is a small
masterpiece.
Stuart has been hired to prevent
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Evening
the married Miss Novak from the
same suicide her great-great
grandmother undertook. In the 1
course of the action, the Acra-
phobia comes again to challenge
him in the successful completion
of his duty. The chore of protect-
ing Miss Novak's life is further
complicated by the fact that he
has fallen in love with her. ButC
no more need, or should, be said.s
This combat of Man and char-s
acter flaw is diverting; while thet
resulting film is chock full of funr
and technicolored suspense.C

By PAUL SAWYER
Rene Clement' s "Forbidden
Games" is executed with such
sparkle and verve and it contains
so many moments of real beauty
that its severe faults are especially
regrettable. Because of an element
of strident melodrama, it creates

Men's Glee Club To Present
New Spirit Song at Concert

By LINNEA HENDRICKSON
The Men's Glee Club presents
its annual spring concert at 8:30
tonight in Hill Aud. The concert
is planned to follow the traditional
Glee Club pattern. It will include
songs by classical composers such
as Handel, Schubert, and Bach,
plus moderns such as Holst and
Cole Porter, and of course the
Michigan songs.
The most eagerly awaited song
in this last section of the concert
will be a song entitled "Go Blue,"
just recently composed by Director
Philip Duey. Duey wasinspired to
write the song by the "Let's go
Blue!" chant which is so much
of the spirit of varsity sports.
"Go Blue" is styled as another
fight song.
Also included in the concert
will be a Broadway medley, and
"The Bugler's Holiday" trio which
will feature three trumpet-playing
members of the Glee Club.
Under Philip Duey's leadership
the Glee Club has gained nation-
wide recognition, and has appear-
ed in concerts from New York to

,Los Angeles. It has made three
European tours, and in 1959and
1963 won the international male
choir competition in Llangollen,
Wales.
Last fall the Glee Club was one
of five American choral groups
selected to represent the United
States at the first International
University Choral Festival. It was
held at Lincoln Center in New
York and at the National Cathed-
ral in Washington D.C.
The Glee Club is completely
managed by students; and the stu-
dent officers are responsible for
all tours and other activities.
From April 28 to May 9, the
Glee Club will tour the eastern
United States, appearing in New
York, Boston and other cities. A
European tour is being planned for
next year.
The adjudicator at the 1959
Llangollen competition described
the Glee Club as "A thoroughly
competent choir, young, engaging,
and adventurous." Duey's arrange-
ment of the varied songs in the
Glee Club's repertoire gives them
a fresh touch.

this weekend.1
The script, which is an account
of a war orphan's stay in a French
peasant household during the Ger-
man invasion, attempts to com-
bine a flavor of ironic satire with{
moments of the keenest pathos.
The bringing together of discor-
dant elements is harsh, and in,
lesser hands the film would have
been a disaster. But Clement gives
the satire the keen irony and un-
derlying sense of sadness that isI
so typical of the French.
Brutal Understatement '
The characters are superbly de-
lineated; and the melodrama is
treated with that brutal under-
statement that makes the films
of, say, Truffaut so powerful. But
it is Clement's very intensity that
is responsible for the film's chief
flaw. The satirical elements be-
come on occasion too blatant and
contrived, and the moments of
pathos are so intense as to be, for,
the most part, unsupportable.,
The most striking example of
this emotional discord comes at
the beginning, when the little girl's.
parents are killed. In one incred-
ible scene, the girl is shown be-
side the body of her mother, her
eyes wide and wondering, touching.
her mother's face and trying to
talk to her. This and other scenes
are too shocking for the ultimate
purpose of the film. When Clement
is ready to accept the girl's mis-
fortunes as a "fait accompli" and
to proceed to other matters, the
emotions of the audience are still
somewhat numbed. Thus the film
begins with a heavy disadvantage.
Yet the rest of the film is more
successful. The girl finds a friend
in the young son of a peasant
family, and the petty squabbles
and little hypocrisies of the peo-
ple around her are wryly elu-
cidated.,
Private World
The two children revert into a

Clement Utilizes Film Methods
To Portray Human Hypocrisies

their elders for examples, they see
nothing wrong in raiding the local
cemetery for- crosses and decora-
tions. By the time their schemes
are discovered, to universal indig-
nation, the film's moral-that the
children's naive impleties are far
less offensive than the hidden, un-
admitted impiety of insensitivity
and hypocrisy - has been driven
home.
The incongruity of burying
earthworms and chicks with great
pomp turns into'tragic irony when
it is reported in one scene that
recent bombing victims are being
thrown into holes "like dogs."
The moral universe is in total
upset; yet there are no real vil-
lains in the film-only well-mean-
ing people who, much like those
who fight wars, often blunder dis-
astrously when faced with situa -
tions thathare too large for them.
Stupidity and petty pride are, the
only causes of the brutal disillu-
sionment and alienation of the
children at the end,
Human Frailties
The device of attacking human
frailties by presenting t h e m
through the eyes of those too
young to understand, old, but here
very effective, provide the film
with its chief virtue. It is a pity
that the emotional impact is so
misplaced. The highly melodra-
matic last scene serves wrongly
to focus the audience's attention
on pity for the little girl only and
not on the broader social implica-
tions.
Caught between satire, anti-war
protest, and a tear-jerker for
mothers of small children, there
is a disruption of unity that blurs
the film's central statement. Yet
it compels interest, for whatever
reason, from beginning to end;
and it contains moments of such
compassion and perceptiveness
that they are likely to remain in
the memory for a long, long
time.

0

it

FILMS

a strong impact upon first viewing private world by setting up an
which does not hold up in the animal cemetery in an old mill.
mind. Yet it is far and away the Having nothing else than the pet-
best film showing in Ann Arbor tiness and superficial pieties of

maybe, but we doubt it,
since we also have

"Mother's"-Student Nite Club
presents
MITCH RYDER
and The Detroit Wheels
"Little Latin, Lupe Lu"
MONDAY-April 4 . .. 8:30-12.. . 223 E. Ann
Presale Tickets: Discount Records, 300 S. State-$2.00

ORGANIZATION NOTICESh
.:."". *": *er...r,..*"'." . ."?°":::.;.".".{. }:.};.. a;:.}...:""..sE":iii.?}r ^s;

I

PETER GRIFFITH -- ED REYNOLDS
classical guitaris tfolk:gitarist
and composer

Daily Classified
NEW YORK FRM RICS
AWAD
BEST
FOREIGN FIL OF
HE YEAR!

Are

The

Great

I

DIAL 8-6416
MASERPIECE
FEL 0LINIS
HISFIRSTIN COLOR
ANGELA RIZZOUI
DERICOFELLINI
GIULIEITIMASMINA
SANDRA MILO
SYLVAKOSCINA

USE OF THIS COLUMN FOR AN-
NOUNCEMENTS is available to officially
recognized and registered student orga-
nizations only. Forms are available in
Room 1011 SAB.
* * *
Newman Student Association, Steer-
ing committee meeting, April 2, 10 a.m.,
331 Thompson. Also Sat., film, "Children
of the Damned," 8 p.m., 331 Thompson.
Folk Dance Club (WAA), Intermedi-
ate folk dancing, every Mon., 8:30-10:30
p.m., Women's Athletic Bldg.
* * *
South Quad Quadrants, Meeting, Sun.,
April 3, 11 p.m., Council Room, SAB.
* * *
India Students Assoc., Spring Ban-
quet, April 2, 6:30 p.m., Michigan Un-
ion Ballroom.
University Lutheran Chapel, 1511
Washtenaw, Sun. morning services, 9:45
& 11:15: Paul Sunday-"Don't !el Your

Birthright!" Rev. Alfred T. Scheips,
speaker. Bible class at 11:15. All wel-
come.
Gamma Delta, International Lutheran
student org., 1511 Washtenaw, Sun., eve-
ning supper at 6 p.m., followed by a
program reviewing the years' activities
at 6:45. Wayne State Gamma Deltans
will be guests. All other interested per-
sons most welcome.
* * *
Guild House, The Roost, refreshments.
games, folksinging, etc. ,April 2, 7-1:30
a.m., Guild House, 802 Monroe.
* * *
Michigan Christian Fellowship, Sem-
inar, Sun., April 3, 4 p.m., Campus
Chapel. Speaker: Ward Wilson. Topic:
"In what Sense is the Bible the 'Word
of God'?"
Lutheran Student Chapel, Palm Sun.
services at 9:30 & 11 a.m., Sun., April
3, Hill at Forest.

4

CANT IERKlBUIKY H OUS.IE

8:30 P.m.

218 N. DIVISION

one dollar per persona

'Ii

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F
C
f. '

Read The
Daily!

TECH NICO 0R°

..

THE UNIVERSITY CHOIR PRESENTS:
9NE TRuaEI pF CoeE t
UNDER THE DIRECTION OF MAYNARD KLEIN

1 TONIGHT at 7and 9
I r
REN ECLEMENT'S
1I
R
FORBIDDEN GAMES
(France-1952)
Two small children act out their
elder's crimes and ceremonies.
Grand Prize Winner, Venice Film Festival
Winner of New York Film Critics' Award
1952 Academy Award Winner
1 R
Extra Short-"Saint Louis Blues"
(Bessie Smith)rR
* R
1 1
R R
I R
1
R
IN THE ARCHITECTURE AUDITORIUM
ADMISSION: FIFTY CENTS
srrsrrsIssrsnrsrr~a Urrrsl
~mmmmum mmmmm m~ mmumu mm m m mm m~mmm~mm~mmm m

04

THE FIRST PERFORMANCE IN ANN ARBOR
POULENC'S TENEBRAE AND BRAHM'S REQUIEM

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 6

HILL AUDITORIUM
ADMISSIONS FREE

8:30 P.M.

MATT HELMfightswith crooks.
MATT HELM tangles with strippers.
MATT HELMgts with the action in his
first film adventure!

ART FILM SERIES
"CHILDREN OF THE DAMNED"
by JACK BRILEY
A moral-fable in science fiction terms
-A film for our time and of our time

{

a1 e ir i tn it

OFFICE HOURS

The
flvirs

I

9
9

Will
slay
COLUMBIA PICTURES pfwrsO1S~-m ma mn
-...M. mm min . mmu 1 m -i s~"

Circulation-764-0558

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