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January 12, 1966 - Image 7

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-01-12

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WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 12,=1966,

TIME MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE SEVE

WEDNESDAY, JANUAI~Y 12, 1966 THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE SEVI EN

Short

Half-life

Haunts

Top

uintets

By HOWARD KOHN deadly this season that Kentucky
and Texas Western are the only
Playing the game of basketball two major colleges left in the
polls and national rankings is ranks of the undefeated.
often worse than playing Russian In fact, Adolph Rupp's Ken-
roulette at a Ku Klux Klan meet- l tuckians were awarded only a 13th
ing-the stakes aren't as high but place rating in the preseason poll
the suspense is terrible. 1by Sports Illustrated and weren't
Iowa was the latest victim to even mentioned in the top 20 of
fall off the tightrope thrones of Dell Sports. Now the Wildcats
the basketball kings with its loss, have zipped off ten straight vic-
second of the season, to Wiscon- tories and are kicking up specula-
sin last weekend. The Associated tions of a Spartan-style coups on
Press sporstwriters. dropped the the cage scene.
Hawkeyes from the Top Ten and Kentucky Bluegrass
replaced them with Kansas. The 64-year-old Rupp, who eats
Duke, meanwhile, still reigns in hot chili like it's going out of
the number one position, but un- style and vows he won't retire un-
beaten Kentucky pulled to within til he's 70, doesn't have an All-
40 points of the Blue Devils. American to lead his team. He
Nationwide Balance doesn't even have an All-American
Competition has been so bal- prospect.
anced and upsets so swift and However, he has four starters

back from last year-Larry Con-
ley, Pat Riley, Tommy Kron and
Louie Dampier-who have picked
up where they left off and are
again averaging in double figures.
Kentucky plays in the annually-
vicious Southeastern Conference
along with third-ranked Vander-
bilt and die-hard Tennessee. How
long the 'Cats cane walk the rosy
path of the untouched victor de-
pends on Fate-and Clyde Lee of
Vanderbilt.
Vandy's Dandy
Vandy, defending SEC champs,
has fashioned a 12-1 record this
year mainly on the ability of a
skinny, shy kid who didn't play
basketball until he was 15 because
he "wouldn't be caught dead in
those short pants." Lee has ma-
tured into 6'9" of basketball lead-
ership for the Commodores and
an All-American center.
Vanderbilt polled: enough votes
for third place in the AP poll this
week to give the South the first
three spots in the rankings.
Duke, conquerer of Michigan
and twice-conqueror of UCLA,
rules the roost for the fourth:
straight week. The Blue Devils
started out somewhere in the mid-
dIe of the preseason polls and lost
their second start to nondescript
South Carolina. But Bob Verga
and Steve Vacendak, the "V for
Victory" guards, began hitting
from the outside like Cazzie II
and IIIhand Duke clicked for ten
triumphs in a row.
Verga, only a junior and al-
ready headed for All-American
honors, practices shooting on an
empty court on Sunday afternoons
so he can terrorize his opponents
the rest of the week and still have
time for dancing the "frug" with
his blonde girlfriend at a KA bash
after the games.'
The Bruins, two-time defending
NCAA champions, are beginning
the long climb back after two dis-
astrous encounters with Duke
early in December. The "V" boys
and Co. unceremoniously ignored
the famed UCLA press and walked
off with a pair of crushing vic-
tories.
UCLA, ranked ninth this week,
had been generally accorded a
better than even chance of cop-
ping a repeat title before the sea-
son. Bruin hopes, though admit-

tedly tarnished, still hinge on All-
American Ed Lacey, Mike Lynn
and Ken Washington and the con-
tinued success of John Wooden's
zone defense.
Wooden's specialty, which stag-
gered his foes for two years, has
become the rage of the basketball
world with revamped versions of
the pressing defense and how to
overcome it now a major part of
game strategy.
Many of the leading nationwide
winners are employing it with
happy results.
Go East
On the east coast St. Joseph's
(Pa.) and Providence have the
talent to go along with the stra-
tegy as evidenced by their rank-
ings. St. Jo's is resting in a fourth
place slot and Providence is settled
in sixth.
Matt Guokas, Jr. and Cliff An-
derson have been carrying on, the
winning tradition of St. Jo's Jack
Ramsey. Guokas, a ballhandling
wizard who's only criticisni is an
over-emulation of Bill Bradley's
good-neighbor policy, is following
in the foosteps of his father who
starred for the Hawks in college
and played on the first champion-
ship team in the NBA.
Providence, playing over the in-
eligibility of Dexter Westbrook
and the weight problem of Bob
Kovalski, has lost only once in 11
games.
The only other eastern teams
mentioned in the voting this week
were Princeton, Boston College
and Syracuse. Princeton has five
men and the memory of Bill
Bradley. BCU has All-American
John Austin and coach Bob Cousy,
and the Orange of Syracuse have
All-American Dave Bing and al
disappointing season in 1964 for
inspiration.
Prairie Panthers
Fifth -'ranked Bradley a n d
tenth-ranked Kansas are the stal-
warts of the Prairie States this
season. Eddie Jackson's rebound-
ing and Ernie Thompson's shoot-
ing are giving the Braves a good
shot at the Missouri Valley title,
while Walt Wesley is helping the
Jayhawkers to a possible Big Eight
crown.
,Nebraska' and Oklahoma City
are the only other two Prairie
State teams raising any dust at
the polls.
Brigham Young, seventh in the
nation according to the AP, is the
best of the Southwest, maintain-
ing a slight edge over eighth-
ranked Texas Western. Senior
Dick Nemelka has been the top
scorer for Brigham Young, while
sophomores Dave Lattin and Wil-

Save
some
leading
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Don't be too surprised if he gives you a complete run-
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Ask him what we mean when we say that the real busi-
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Learn the roles of chemistry, physical optics, mathemati-
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EN

CLYDE LEE, Vanderbilt's great 6'9" center, battles with former
Wolverine All-American Bill Buntin under the boards in last
year's Michigan-Vanderbilt contest. Lee has sparked the Com-
modores to a third-place ranking in the AP poll and a 12-1 record
this season.

BOB VERGA appears airborne, along with the top-ranked Duke
Blue Devils, as he lets fly with another of his deadly jump shots
from outside in last December's game with Michigan at Cobo
Hall. Verga has teamed with Steve Vacendak to lead Duke to a
12-1 mark, including last night's squeaker over Clemson.

lie Worsley are sparking the of-
fense for Western.
Back to the Midwest, Iowa,
Michigan, and Minnesota have
b e e n cornering the headline
market in their fight for the Big
Ten championship.
The Hawkeyes were the last of'
the Big Ten teams to fall from the
AP's Top Ten, following the wake
of the Wolverines and the Goph-
ers. Wisconsin shocked Iowa last
Saturday with ball control tactics
and a str'ingent defense on Hawk-
eye George Peeples to send them
tumbling.
eepes had been teaming with
Chris Pervall to give Iowa national
prominence. The Hawkeyes now
have an 8-2 slate.
Iowa's exodus was preceded by
Michigan, which lost three in a
row over the holidays, and Min-
nesota. The Gophers lost top scor-
er Lou Hudson on a broken wrist
late in December and have been
able to win only half their games

since. Hudson, however, comes
back in the lineup Saturday.
Dayton, a Midwest independent,
garnered a first place vote this
week despite failing to break into
the select circle. All-American
Henry Finkle holds the key to
Dayton's rise-or fall.-
Following is the Top Ten, with
first place votes in parentheses,
won-lost records through last Sat-
urday and total points on a 10-9-
8-7 etc. basis:
1. Duke 32 (11-1) 405
2. Kentucky 8 (10-0) 365
3. Vanderbilt 3 (12-1) 338
4. St. Joseph's, Pa.. (10-2) 238.
5. Bradley (13-1) 236
6. Providence (10-1) 174
7. Brigham Young (10-1) 149.
8. Texas Western (12-0) 120
9. UCLA (9-3) 103
10. Kansas (11-2) 47
Others receiving votes, listed alpha-
betically: Boston College, Chicago Lo-
soya, Cincinnati, Davidson, Dayton 1,
Iowa, MICHIGAN, Nebraska, New Mex-
ico, North Carolina State Oklahoma
City, Princeton, South Carolina, Syra-
cuse, Tulsa, Virginia Tech, Western
Kentucky.

SWIMMERS SET TO SPLASH:
31' Awaits In diana Challenge

By JIM LaSOVAGE
Swimming coach Gus Stager
didn't have much to say about last
weekend's meets.
He's more concerned with what
will happen next Saturday in Matt
Mann Pool.
That's when the Hoosiers will
come up from Indiana to try for
revenge against the Wolverine
tankers who snapped a 47-meet
winning streak with a 70-53 tri-
umph last February. But this sea-
son's first dual meet clash with
the Hoosiers Is scheduled a month
earlier than last year's meet.
That's why Stager is concerned.
There hasn't been much time to
get in top shape, and times have
been far from stellar.
Slow Times
"Last weekend's times were
much too slow," Stager commented
yesterday. "Slow times were good
enough to win," he said of the
Wisconsin meet in which Mich-
igan emerged as a 79-40 victor,
but added that he expected that
clockings would have to be consid-
erably faster if the team is to win
on Saturday.I
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By the time of the Indiana meet
last year, the swimmers were in
good enough shape to set several
varsity records - in times which
were not bettered again that sea-
son. No one even came close to a
record last weekend.
Further, in the Big Ten Relays
meet the Hoosiers won six of 11
first places, a foreboding fact fac-
ing the Wolverines. But neither
were the Hoosiers' times up to par.
And Michigan State's best swim-
mers took two firsts and a few
points away that Michigan could
just as easily win as Indiana.
Every event will be a completely
new race, and it's nearly impos-
sible to predict the outcome of all
of them.
Coach Counts Points
Stager has already made up a
tentative lineup, event by event.
He also attempted to determine
possible winners. Giving Michigan
the benefit of the doubt in a few
races, the score comes out with
the Wolverines on top by an even
larger margin than last year.
Then, being slightly more pessi-
mistic, the prognosticated score
reversed itself and the Hoosiers
were on top by the same margin.
That's why Stager figures it'll be
a close meet.
That's saying something, too.
This season Indiana coach Jim
(Doc) Counsilman boasts that he
is coaching potentially his best'
team ever, and he's had some good
ones.
Newcomers Help
This presents another reason
why Michigan can't be overlooked.
With all but three members of its
greatest team ever returning from
last year, several sophomores are

giving Stager hopes of making
this the best yet. Freestylers John
Salassa and Tim McDaid (dis-
tances), breaststroker Dave Cush-
ing, and all-around swimmer Ken
Wiebeck are four sophs who
promise to have good careers at
Michigan. The outcome of this
meet' may show much of what is
to come in the conference finale.
For now, though, it's a lot of
hard practices first. Three times

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AUNIM

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COACH GUS STAGER

this week the swimmers will work
out twice in one day. The tension
is growing. The team ;spirit is
building up. The atmosphere is
slightly optimistic. Just about like
it was last year before Indiana
came into town.

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11

Last year's showdown dual meet
with the Hoosiers proved the Wol-
verines stronger, man-to-man, on
an individual dual meet basis. But
Indiana, with the outstanding in-
dividuals managed to capture the
Big Ten meet at the end of the
season.
Either way it works out this
year, the big dual meet result will
be significant, but still won't de-
termine the champions of the con-
ference since the variation in scor-
ing between the dual meets and
the Big Ten meet provides an ad-
vantage for the strong individuals,
rather than the well-balanced
squad.

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