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March 29, 1966 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-03-29

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I

PAGE EIGHT

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, MARCH 29, 1966

High Court Validates Athletic Board Role,

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(Continued from Page 3)
dictments, under both laws, one
enacted in 1866 and the other in
1870.
The 1866 law makes it a mis-
demeanor, punishable by one year
in prison, and $1000 fine, or both
to act "under cover of law" to
deprive anyone of his constitution-
al rights.
The 1870 law makes it a felony
punishable by up to 10 years in
prison and $5000, or both, to con-
spire to deprive anyone of his 14th
Amendment rights without due
process of law.
U.S. District Court Judge W
Harold Cox in Jackson, Miss., had
dismissed the felony indictment,-
obtained by the government
against the 17 men, including three
law officers. Cox left misdemeanor
indictments standing against the

officers-Sheriff Lawrence A. Rai-
ney of Neshoba County, Depu--
ty Cecil Price and Philadelphia
Police Officer Richard W. Willis-
and dismissed the indictments
against the others.
In the Penn case, U.S. District
Court Judge W. A. Bootle in Ma-
con, Ga., had dismissed felony in-
dictments against the six men:
three of them members of the Ku
Klux Klan.
Here, too, the indictments were
revived although, Stewart said
that, unlike the other case, the
indictment named "no person al-
leged to have acted in any way
under the cover of state law."
However, Stewart said, "the in-
dictment in fact contains an ex-
press allegation of state involve-
ment" and this allegation is
enough to reverse the lower court
and clear the way for trial.

(Continued from Page 1)
in athletics on the board and thus
tends to over represent this por-
tion of the faculty."
The most frequent criticism that
faculty members levelled against
the performance of the board was
that "most of its members are too
much under the influence of a
strong athletic director.,
The board considers itself fi-
nancially self sufficient, and had
a net operating income for the
fiscal year 1965 of $393,077, as well
as a surplus of over $250,000 in
fiscal 1964.
Yet it is not entirely self suf-
ficient since, besides revenues it
gets from gate receipts, the board
also receives five dollars from each
student's tuition per semester. In
effect, this is an allocation from
the University which totalled
$214,800 last year.
The board has used its surpluses
to build the $1.2 million women's
pool, the men's pool, Palmer field
house and other facilities.
Many of the salaries for the
physical education and intra-
mural department are also paid
out of its budget.
Four years ago the board began
charging a $12 fee for football
tickets which had previously been
free to students. During the '63-
'64 season the board also began
charging for basketball tickets,
which had also previously been
free to students.
This move, which created cam-
pus controversy, was made to help
finance the building of the new;

University events building,
though intramural facilities
increasingly inadequate.

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

(Continued from Page 2)
Cancelled Lecture: Prof. Ren Wellek's
lecture, scheduled for Tues., March 29
has been cancelled. This was to be
sponsored by the Program on Compara-
tive literatures, Dept. of Slavic 1Lan-
guages and Literatures and the Slavic
Language and Area Center.
Admission Test for Graudate Study
in Business: Candidates taking the Ad-
mission Test for Graduate Study in
Business on Sat., April 2, are requested
to report to Room 130, Busliness Ad-
ministration Bldg. at 8:45 a.m. Saturday
Term Illb (Summer Session) An-
nouncement: This announcement is
now available on the third floor of the
Administration Bldg., Room 3510. The
Time Schedule for this term (IIlb -
Summer Session) will be available in
mid-June.
Institute for Soical Research: Dedi-
cation ceremony, .Wed., March 30, 2-
3 p.m. Remarks by Vice-President Mar-
vin L. Niehuss, Goy. George Romney
and Rensis Likert, director of the insti-
tute.
Foreign Visitors
The following are the foreign visi-
tors programmed through the Interna-
tional Center who will be on campus
this week on the dates indicated. Pro-
gram arrangements are being made by
Mrs. Clifford R. Miller. International.
Center, 764-2148.
Miss Carole J. Van Osdol, counselor
Office of Foreign Student Affairs, Uni-
March 29-30.
versity of Illinois, Champaign, Ill.
Overseas Student Trust, London, Eng-
Martin Kenyon, executive secretary
land, April 3-4.
Placement
PLACEMENT INTERVIEWS: Bureau of
Apprintments-Seniors & grad students,
please call 764-7460 for appointments
with the following:
FRI., APRIL I-
Office of International Affairs, Treas-
ury Dept., Wash., D.C.-MA's in Econ.
or international affairs with bkgd. in
econ. Ting. in international ecen., fi-
nancial & monetary fields helpful. Out-
standing BA grads will be considered.
Positions in U.S. embassies throughout
the world as financial attaches & as-

sistants.
POSITION OPENINGS:
Evans Products Co., Plymouth, Mich.
-Ass't. to Dir, of Adv. and Public Re-
lations of Evans' Trans. Equipment
Group. 2-3 yrs. exper. To do editing of
small company newspaper, and even-
tually the writing of publicity releases.
direct mail letters, etc.
Management Consultants, Chicago, Ili
-Cost Analyst-MA degree with mfg
bkgd. in aerospaceautomotive, etc. 5
per cent travel. Also Agricultural De-
vel. Specialist-BS or adv. degree in
chem. engrg. or chem. and knowledge
of fertilizer production processes and
mktg. of agri. products with at least
yrs. exper. in ammonia fertilizers.
Wilson & Co., Inc., Chicago, Ill. -
Accounting Clerk. Accounting courses
and some exper. Must be draft-exempt
Prep. of claim papers and acctg. work
in connection with claims.
Big Brothers of Oakland County, Pon-
tiac, Mich.-Prof. staff vacancy for
grad with degree in humanities or soc
sci. To do recruiting, screening and
trng. of men to become friends with
fatherless boys. Also brief supportive
casework service.
The Fourth R Foundation, Lincoln.
Neb.-Field Rep. for Foundation. Col-
lege grad. Trng. and exper. in educ. and
must have thought through religious
point of view. To promote instruction
about religion in public schools and
enlist financial support for work of
foundation.
Management Consultants, New York.
N.Y.-Vice-president-General Mgr. De-
gree in Bus. Exper. in Mktg. with dem-
onstrated success in gen. mgmt. in field
of consumer goods. Must have bkgd. in
photographic industry.
* * *
For further information, please call
764-7460, General Div., Bureau of Ap-
pointments, 3200 SAB.
SUMMER PLACEMENT SERVICE:
212 SAB-
INTERVIEWS:
MARCH 31-
Jack Roberts Pool Service, Farming-
ton, Mich.-Men for swimming pool
maintenance work, unlimited hours. Cai
required.
APRIL 4-
Camp Missaukee, Mich. - Girls foi
craft director, archery, nature, pro-
gram director, unit counselors and
cooks.
Details at Summer Placement, 21<
SAB, Lower Level.

According to Crisler, these ticket
charges were needed since revenue
was not increasing in the same
proportion as were operation costs.
He says that most schools in the
Big Ten were now charging stu-
dents for admission to football
games, and several had been
charging for tickets many years
gefore the University started to do
so.
Plant says that the major reason
for instituting football and basket-
ball charges was to help finance
the building of the $6.7 million
University events building. The
board in control has taken on the
responsibility of funding the $5.8
million bond issues which is being
used to finance the building,
scheduled for use by the 1968
basketball season.
Plant admits, however, that the
athletic department's physical
plant, especially its intramural
facilities, does not compare favor-
ably with those of many other Big
Ten schools.
Crisler himself recognizes that
the intramural facilities are great-
ly inadequate, having been design-
ed for a total University student
body of about 9000.
He concedes that it is highly
unlikely that much can be done
to improve the recreational fa-
cilities at the University until the
debt incurred by the building of
the new events building is paid off,
which will not be for at least
three years.
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