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March 29, 1966 - Image 6

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-03-29

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PAGE SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, MARCH 29.1966

,..SXT E MC IG ND IYT1iflYMIT AIR

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TIA VEJN G ABROAD?
DON'T GO UNINFORMED
Obtain helpful hints from three
well-known travel books
1. Let's Go-Harvard Student Guide
2. Europe on $5 a Day
3. Work Study Travel Abroad
Available now at discount prices at
UAC Student Travel Committee
2nd floor Michigan Union

A

You can sell
your
TEXTBOOKS,
for,
CASH,, f
nytime at a ,;

There's no limit to the good a
man can accomplish through
reliance on God. But it takes
humility and a deep spiritual
commitment. You learn to de-
pend on the divine Love that
makes possible every worth-
while act. You're invited to hear
this subject explored further at
a one-hour public lecture by
William Henry Alton of The
Christian Science Board of-
Lectureship. The lecture title is
"Man Unlimited." Everyone is
welcome to come and listen.
GII sianScience lecitre]
8:00-Friday, April 1
Aud. A, Angell Hall
William H. Alton, C.S.B.
Sponsored by the
Christian Science Organization

I

a

State St. at North Univ.

insights and insults
CHUCK VETRNER
ILet's Scribble Scrabble
To Save Our Pastime
With excitement and encomiums mounting for the approaching
baseball season, a lot of people are beginning to forget one of the
greatest problems facing American sport today. The dilemma is, of
course, the steady demise of our table-game-and-puzzle national
pastime-scrabble. Once this revered activity was held in such high
esteem that no one would dare criticize it. It was a symbol of democ-
racy and American as apple pie, U.S. Steel, hot dogs, and lavender
capri pants.
Today, scrabble is a sport, surrounded by controversy and assault-
ed with derision. At one end are the old timers. These lugubrious
souls strain to hold back the tears when they see the modern game.
Fondly they reminisce about the era when scrabble was for the real
egghead, not the ivy league youths who are still fondling their B.A.
degrees in English.
The players used to have class, claim the'venerable experts.
Now there's no strategy. Everybody aims for getting the "X" and
"Q" in a Double Letter Value box, and all the excitement is gone.
Scoring 50 points from Imarquee" just doesn't bring the same
thrill when any student can do it.
But even the younger spectators are disenchanted. They com-
plain the game is too slow, and they are turning to shorter, more ac-
tion-packed diversions like dots, tic-tac-toe, and checkers. Even
Ouija board sales are picking up at a phenomenal pace, and one of
the major television networks is considering a three year contract to
broadcast the Monopoly Game of the Week.
Clearly, scrabble needs dramatic revision and courageous reform
if it is to recaptivate the imagination of America's sportsmen. First,
something must be done to cut down the point totals, and make the
big score have meaning again. One possible solution would be to
deaden the point values of the wooden tiles.
Another way to meet the problem would be to simply make the
playing board bigger. If there were more space, the climactic moment
of landing a word on a rubric Triple Word Value could once again
bring a crowd to its feet.
To speed up the game, a rule could be instated to place a
three minute time limit for each move. One fan suggested that
an electric clock could count off the seconds, and a shrill peanut
whistle blast could denote a violation.
Going along with such thinking would be a new measure to
prevent the players from lumbering into a different room to
check a dictionary or find an aspirin. Such tactics are usually
just stalls to give the player a chance for his mind to warm up.
Despite these rule changes, scrabble still might not reach its old
status. Other possible changes include cutting thenumber of games
played and eliminating night games and back-to-back contests (some-
times called doubleheaders). This step would mean the players
would be fresher and capable of going all out for every match.
Some of the bearded radical thinkers feel that even these meas-
ures don't go far enough. They say that if other activities are re-
placing scrabble, the only solution is to copy the trend in other sports
and introduce innovations that include the best features of the
competition.
Some of the tic-tac-toe element has suggested that scrabble
eliminate all the letters except X's and O's. Card sharks want to
see the wooden tiles made larger and more flexible so they can be
shuffled. For years, one of the major game manufacturers has
been pleading for the addition of spinner dials and dice to make
the game more complex.
These mare all worthwhile ideas which should be given serious
thought. Of course, they would lead to some basic structural changes
which would revolutionize the game. But undoubtedly the new form
would be more popular. It would set off a construction boom for new,
ultramodern tables and chairs to house the contests. More important,
it would bring fantastic profits for everyone.
Of course it wouldn't really be scrabble anymore, but every suc-
cessful venture has a few drawbacks.
SPORTS NIGHT EDITOR:
fi -j .GRETCHEN TWIETMEYER

Batteries: Radakovic (W), and
Brickley; Foshie (L), Johnson (6th),
and Sizemore.

FIRST GAME
GRAND CANYON
Kenny, if
Snell, c
Bush, lb
Austin, ef
Brannan, rf,
Mendenhall, 3b
Heiwig, Sb
McDonald, ss
Murray, p
Brown, p
a-Bishop, ph
Williams, p
Barfield, p
Totals

Diamondmen

AB R
3 0
4 0
4 0
4 0
4 1
3 0
3 1
3 1
0 0
0 0
1 0
0 0
29 3

:7

MICHIGAN AB RI
Gihooley, ss 4 3
Sygar, 2b 2 3
Tanona, if 4 3
Bara, rf 3 0
Schryer, cr 1 1
Fisher, of-rf 4 1
McVey, 3b 2 2
Nelson, lb 3 0
Berlne, c 4 3
Guidi, p 5 1
Totals 32 171
a-Struck out for Brown in 6th.

H RBI
0 0
1 0
1 0
0 0
1 0
S 0
1 0
3 2
0 0
0 0
00
0 0
0 0
7 2
H RBI
1 2
1 2
37
2 0
10
1 2
00
0 1
3 1
1 2
11 16
0-,-1
0-- 3

Special To The Daily
TEMPE, Ariz.-Led by the fine
pitching of two sophomores and
aided by some lusty hitting, Mich-
igan powered its way past Grand
Canyon and Arizona State yester-
day to sweep both ends of a dou-
Monday's game:

Take

Two

Wyoming
MICHIGAN

001 400 000-5 10 2
000 050 10x-6 7 2

bleheader. The victories stretched
the Wolverines' victory string to
four against no defeats, and drop-
ped Arizona State to 15-5 and
Grand Canyon to 8-3-1.
In the opener, Larry Guidi, from
Croton Falls, N.Y., struck out four
men, walked two, and scattered
seven hits, while allowing only
three unearned runs to pick up his
first career win for the Wolverines.
But hitting was the story of this
game. Les Tanona, a junior from
Hamtramck, drove in seven runs
on a home run, a double and two
singles. The game was sewed up
in the seventh 'when 14 men went
to the plate and 10 runs were
scored on six hits and four walks.
Guidi helped himself in this inning
with a triple.
All the Way
Earlier in the contest, Tanona's
three-run homer in the first gave
Michigan a lead which they never
relinquished, although Grand Can-
yon pulled to a tie in the second.
But a double by Andy Fisher drove
in two more runs in the third.
This game was called after seven
innings because of a time limit set
so that the Michigan club could
travel to play Arizona State.
In their second game, the Wol-
verines started out just as they
had ended the first. Five runs were
pushed across the plate in the first
inning on five hits, two walks, and
two errors. The big hit was Chan
Simonds' bases-loaded triple.
14 Down
After the first inning, however,
both pitchers settled down to pitch
fine ball. Michigan's Geoffrey
Zahn, from Toledo, got the win-
his first-by allowing only four
hits, striking out six, and walking
one. In one stretch he retired 14
men in a row. Arizona State's only
run was unearned.
Also in the second game,
Tanona got two more hits and one
RBI, making his total for the day
five hits in eight trips, four runs.

scored, and eight RBI's.
In Sunday's game, Mel Waka-
bayashi proved he can swing with
a bat just as well as with a hockey
stick. The Wolverine center turned
second sacker, led the baseball
team to a 6-5 victory over
Wyoming.
The Coyboys had taken a 5-0
lead into the fifth inning, but
Michigan came up with a five-run
outburst in the bottom half of the
frame. The rally was sparked by
W akabayashi's triple' into right
center which drove in two of the
runs. In the seventh inning, he
singled to knock in Andy Fisher
with the game-winning run.
Nick Radakovic, another talent-
ed sophomore pitcher, had trouble
with the Cowboys in the first few
innings, but settled down and
picked up the victory.
Michigan scored its first two
runs on a 350-foot homer by Al
Bara. Wakabayashi's triple came
after Fisher and Doug Nelson had
drawn walks. Mel came home him-
self when Wyoming muffed the
outfield relay.
The winning run was a result
of managerial strategy as Fisher
drew a base on balls, advanced- to
second on a sacrifice bunt, and
then flew home on Waka's smash.
Today the Wolverines f a C e
Western Colorado and Arizona
State.
EXHIBITION BASEBALL
St, Louis.3, New York (N) 0
Houston 6, Oklahoma City (PCL) 1
New York (A) 4, Chicago (A) 1
Pittsburgh 5, Los Angeles 0
Cincinnati 5, Atlanta 3
Philadelphia 5, Baltimore 2
San Francisco 6, Chicago '(N) 3
California 11, Cleveland 1
Washington 3, Minnesota 2

U
E

4

MICHIGAN
Grand Canyon

302002 H
030 000

F.

E-McDonald, Fisher, Nelson. DP-
Bush, McDonald, and Bush. P0-A-
Michigan 21-9, Grand Canyon 21-8.
LOB--Michigan 8. Grand Canyon 8.
2B-Fisher, Tanona. 3B-Gurdi. HR
--Tanona, McDonald. S-Murray. SF
--Nelson.

PITCHING SUMMARIES

C Ut ILT ,U R JE ID
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CKELS ARCADE

IP
Guidi (W, 1-0) 7
Murray (L, 2-1) 5%
Brown t
Williams3
Barfield %
WP--Murray, Guidi.

H R ER BB S0
7 3 0 2 4
4 7 6 8 6
-6 2
3 4 4 2 0
T-2:29.

MICHIGAN
Gilhooley,
Sizemore,
Schrier, cf
Fisher, cf
Spicer, 3b
Tanona, If
Bara, rf
Simonds, i
Wakabayas]
Zahn, p
Totals

SECOND GAME
F ~ AB R:
ss 4 1
5 0
4 1
1 0
5 1
4 1
4 1
b 3 1
hi, 2b 3 0
430
37 61

ARIZONA STATE
Jackson, cf
Dyer, c
Gretta, rf
Carpenter, If
Kleinman, lb
Armstrong, ss
Lind, 3b
Smitheran, 2b
Pentland, p
Totals
MICHIGAN
Arizona State

AB R
3 0
4 1
4 0
40
4 0
4 0
3 0
3 0
3 0
32 1

H RBI
1 0
0 0
1 0
0 0
1 0
2 0
2 0
1 3
2 0
0 0
10 4
H RBI
1 0
0 0
1 1
1 0
1 0
0 0
0 0
00
0 0
4 1

' r \
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Arizona State 27-6. LOB-Michigan
8, Arizona State 5. 2B-Spicer. 3B
-Gilhooley, Simonds.
PITCHING SUMMARIES

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Zahn (W, 1-0) 9
Pentland (L, 3-1) 9
T-1 :57.

H R ER BB SO
4 1 0 1 6
10 6 5 3 8,

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