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March 29, 1966 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1966-03-29

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, MARCH. 23, 1966'

PAGE TW(i THE MICHIGAN DAILY TUESDAY, MARCH 29. 1966

Tl 1H E ATRE,
Sartre' s Mouches':
'Lyrical Humanism

Ballet Reflects Problems,
Potential of Company

By JOHN CRUMB, JR.
Each year on the anniversary
of the murder of Agamemnon the
dead rise from the nether regions
fo'r 24 hours to torment the living.
Each year the terror of the people
of Argos mounts, as they become
more abject, under the unpitying,
accusing glare of the dead.
For the dead are no longer. In
their eyes the guilt of the people
is fixed inalterably. Though the
living cannot disown their own
guilt, they do constant penance to
distract the constant regard of
the dead.'
Fixedin the eyes of the dead,
the citizens of Argos are reduced
to mere things. Hence, in their
own eyes the people have become
less than human, more dead than
living.
Aegisthus destroyed the House
of Atreus, the last threat of in-
stability in Argos. He then created
thi myth of the dead to eliminate
personal freedom, and thereby to
guarantee order among the sub-
jects of his new realm. In time,
even Aegisthus fell victim to his
own system, and searched death
to end his lifeless existence.
Yet the House of Atreus was not
dead: a spark, Agamemnon's re-
bellious son, survived to return
and slay Aegisthus. At the same
time, Orestes took on the whole
guilt of Argos, without repentance.
Orestes freed the city from its sin.
"It has been suggested that
because Sartre has created a
theater of ideas, his characters
have become puppet illustrations
of . his philosophy," said Don]

Harms, director of "Les Mouches"
(outlined above).
"I have notvfound this to be a
problem. 'Les Mouches,' the first
play of Sartre, is not as existential
as are his later plays. Rather it
is written in a kind of 'lyrical
humanism.' Sartre has a good
sense of psychology, and every
actor feels well motivated in his
part. Every scene has lyrical pos-
sibilities.
"'Les Mouches' has an am-
biguous ending," Mr. Harms con-
tinued. "That itself is unusual for
Sartre. No philosophy is offered
to replace Aegisthus' order. It
seems that Orestes is merely say-
ing, 'We have done some pretty
bad things, but it's ridiculous not
to face up to them.'
"It's not clear just what Orestes
is going to do in the end when
he strides through the mass of
Argos' amazed citizens. Nor is
Electra'satragedyi really under-
stood.
"Most of the actors have studied
for some time in France, though
we all naturally lose some of our
fluency when we return to the
States. Intonation has been our
biggest problem: in English emo-
tion is usually conveyed through
emphasis or tone of voice. This is
not true of French, and it's hard
for us to break such a habit.
" 'Les Mouches' is completely
sold out for both Tuesday and
Wednesday performances. Our fi-
nancial success is very encourag-
ing, and we would like to make
the French play production an
annual tradition."

By LINDA SIEGRIST
The National Ballet, which per-i
formed Sunday at Hill Aud., is
unique among young American
companies. Since its inception four
years ago, the company has at-c
tained professional standing-fi-
nancially and to a certain extent
artistically. Within this short timez
span the company, has built a
repertoire of 21 ballets, and it
now has a guaranteed performing
contract of 30 works which are
spent mainly in residence ini
Washington D. C.c
In Sunday's performance, thei
dancers displayed their ability inc
classical, contemporary, and mimel
and character dancing. More thanj
this, the performance mirrored the1
problems and potentials of a fledg-'
ling ballet company to attain anI
accepted quality of dance and yet1
to develop some unique style of
interpretation of its own.
In the opening number-Act
Two of "Swan Lake"-Director
Frederic Franklin was aware of
the great amount of precision of
movement and sense of direction
needed in this segment. That the
corps, in many cases, did not meet
these requirements, was due basic-
ally to its youth (the averge of the
dancers is 21) and also to the fact
that the company has not yet
found a singular style with which
to mold a disciplined corps. The
corps also lacked a sense of lyric
movement, due again to lack of
experience and partly to Conduc-
tor Ottavio De Rosa's staid inter-
pretation of the score. Nor did
the insignificant sound from the
21 piece orchestra add too much
to the flow of the ballet in general.

Yet there were moments-the "pas
de deux" and "pas de quatre"-
in which the dancers met a highf
degree of excellence.I
The contemporary ballet me-
dium, and in the case of the sec-1
ond number, Balanchine's "Four4
Temperaments," seems to adapt;
more successfully to the com-
pany's resources. The corps, per-
haps because of its American
makeup, showed greater precision
and technical ability in interpret-l
ing Balanchine's dance style. The
orchestra was much more effec-
tive in contributing to the mood
of the number, mainly because,
Hindemith can be more success-
fully adapted to a small ensemble,
than can Tchaikovsky. In all,;
"Four Temperaments" was the
highlight of the afternoon. Chris-
tensen's "Con Amore" was includ-
ed as the finale, because of the
color in and clever use of costumes,
scenery and gaiety, not particular-
ly for any display of artistic
ability.
Perhaps the biggest problem
confronting a new ballet company
is the calibar and size of its male
corps. The National Ballet is fac-
ed with this problem too. The men
showed technical potential but
they lacked technical finesse and
a certain depth of interpretation,
both of which should come with
maturity and more experience. Yet
Sunday's performance was excit-
ing. The company reflects a prom-
ising answer to the public de-
mands of today's so-called cultural
boom. It has able directors in
Frederic Franklin and Oleg Tu-
pine, and it has the potential dan-
cers. All it needs is time.

Across
Campus
TUESDAY, MARCH 29
8:45 p.m. - The conference
sponsored by the University Center
for Continuing Education of Wom-
en, "New Patterns of Employ-
ment," will hold registration in
Rackham Lobby.
1:30 p.m. - The Management
Development Seminar will present
"On-the-Job Coaching and Coun-
seling" in the Union.
3:30 p.m.-The Center for Rus-
sian Studies and history depart-
ment will present a panel discus-
sion with Peter Hanak, Gyorgy
Ranki, Hungarian Academy of
Sciences, and Jiri Koralka, Czech-
oslovak Academy of Sciences on
"East European History and So-
ciety" in Lane Hall Aud.
4:10 p.m. - The program on
comparative literature will pre-
sent a University lecture by Prof.

Rene Wellek, from the comparative
literature department, Yale Uni-
versity, on "The Poet as Critic, the
Critic as Poet, the Poet-Critic"
in Aud. A.
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 30
9:30 a.m.-Registration for the
Michigan Scholars in Collegel
Teaching Conference will be held!
in Rackham Lobby.
Noon-The Office of Religious
Affairs will present a book dis-
cussion by Imad Khadduri on "The
Other Side of 'Exodus'" in the
Multipurpose Rm., UGLI.
1:30 p.m. - The management
development seminar will present
"Effective Cost Control" in the
Union.
2 p.m.-The Institute for Social
Research will hold a dedication
ceremony with Vice-President for
Research A. Goeffrey Norman
presiding and with speakers
Executive Vice-President Marvin
L. Niehuss, Gov. George Romney
and ISR Director Rensis Likert
in Rackham Aud.

LUNCH-DISCUSSION
TUESDAY, March 29, 12:00 Noon
U.M. International Center
SUBJECT:
"PORTRAYAL OF THE BURMESE PEOPLE-
CLEARING UP SOME MISCONCEPTIONS"
SPEAKER: MR. A. L. BECKER
Instructor of English, College of Engineering

0

For reservations,
call 662-5529

'Sponsored by the
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Ending
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M ORALS in LAW and - M EDIjCINEI- ,"O T A EP I 'S
TOPIC-"CONT RACE PTIVES'
WHEN: Tuesday, Mar. 29, 7:30 P.M.-Contraceptives
WHERE: Michigan League, Michigan Room
South Ingalls Street
PANEL: Prof. B. James George, Jr., U of M Law School
Dr. Carl P. Malmquist, Dep t. of Psychiatry and
Child Psychiatry, U of M Medical School
The Rev. Paul Light, American Baptist Campus Center
Father Edward Mitchell, Roman Catholic Chaplain,
University Hospital
MODERATOR: Donald V.. Young, Episcopal Chaplaincy .to the
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Sponsored by: Ecumenical Campus Ministry and the Episcopal-
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OPEN TO MEDICAL STUDENTS, INTERNS, RESIDENTS, LAW
STUDEt'TS, STUDENT NURSES, AND ALL OTHER
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The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editor-
ial responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRI'T'TEN form to
Room 3519 Administration Bldg. be-
tore 2 p.m.of the day preceding
publication, and by 2 p.m. Friday
for Saturday and Sunday. General
Notices may be published a maxi-
mum of two times on request; Day
Calendar items. appear once . only
Student organization notices are not
accepted for publication.
TUESDAY, MARCH 29
Day, Calendar
Continuing Education of Women Con-
ference-Registration, Rackham Lobby,
8:45 p.m.
Management Development Seminar-
"On-the-Job Coaching and Counseling":
Michigan Union, 1:30 p.m.
Russian Studies and Dept. of History
Panel Discussion-Peter Hanak, Gyorgy
Ranki, Hungarian Academy of Sciences,
and Jiri Koralka, Czechoslovakia Acad-
emy of Sciences, "East European His-
tory and Society": Lane Hail Aud., 3:30
p.m.
Program on Comparative Literature
University Lecture-Rene Wellek, pro-
fessor of comparative literature, Yale
University, "The Poet as Critic, the
Critic as Poet, the Poet-Critic": Aud.
A, Angell Hall, 4:10 p.m.
School of Music /Degree Recital -
Sharon Hefke, pianist: Recital Hall,
School of'Music, 7 p.m.
School of Music Recital--Recital Hall,
School of Music, 8:30 pm.
Events Wednesday
Michigan Scholars in College Teach-
ing Conference-Registration, Rackham
-~Loqby, 9:30 a.m.
Office of Religious Affairs Book Dis-
ORGANIZATION

cussion--Imad Khadduri, "The Other
Side of 'Exodus' ": 2417 Mason Hall,
12 m.
Management Development Seminar-
"Effective Cost Control": Michigan Un-
ion, 1:30 p.m.
Institute for Social Research Dedica-
tion Ceremony-Geoffrey Norman, prey
siding, Marvin L. Niehuss, George Rom-
ney, and Rensis Likert, speakers: Rack-
ham Aud., 2 p.m.
Dept. of Zoology Seminar-W. J. Wel-
shons, Dept of Genetics, Iowa State
University, "GeneticFine Structure in
Drosophila": 1400 Chemistry Bldg., 4
p.m.
Anatomy Semnar-R. M. Koerker, De-
partment of Anatomy, "Effect of Hypo-
physectomy on the Digestive System of
the Mouse": 2501 East Medical Bldg.. 4
p.m.
School of Music Concert-The Univer-
sity Symphony.Band, William D. Revel-
li, conductor: Hill Aud., 8:30 p.m.
1, 11

General Notices
Doctoral Examination for JameE
Marshall Wideman, Physiology; thesis:
"Some Supramedullary Influences upon
the Swallowing Reflex," Tues., March 29
4019 E, Medical Bldg;, at 9 a.m. Chair-
man, L. T. Rutledge.
D)octoral Examination for Homer Al-
fred Neal, Jr., Physics; thesis: "The
Polarization Parameter in Elastic Pro-
ton-Proton Scattering from .75 to 2.84
GeV," Tues., March 29, 629 P. A. Bldg.
at 1:30 p.m. Chairman, M. J. Longo.
Doctoral Examination for Lewis Ben-
jamin Horne, English Language & Lit-
erature; thesis' "The Growth of Aware-
ness in the Novels of Hawthorne and
Hardy," Tues., March 29, 2601 Haven
Hall, at 3 p.m. Chairman, R. F. Haugh.
Doctoral' Examination for George
Franklin Farris, Psychology; thesis: "A
Casual Analysis. of Scientific Perform-
ance," Tues., March 29, 6006 ISR, at 2
p.m. Chairman, R. L. Kahn.
PH. 483-4680
E n. OnCARPENTER ROAD
FREE IN-CAR HEATERS
BOX OFFICE OPEN 6:30
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Doctoral Examination for Louis Vic-
tor Zuck, Linguistics; thesis: "The
Syntax of the Parker Manuscript of thc
Anglo-Saxon Chronicle from the Year
892 through 1001." Chairman, S. M
Kuhn.

FE LI..IN I'S
f TIME
TECHNICOLOR!

STM . ,JAMES COBUVRN GE . COBB
GILA GOLAN " EDW~ARD MUUIARE

4

I

I

I;7L.7LIiI~1~

:.

(Continued on Page 8)

ti

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INTER HOUSE ASSEMBLY NEEDS:
1 GIRL-to coordinate picnics
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1 BOY-to work with one girl
1 MORE GIRL-to coordinate

'' It

ISRAEL FUCHS
Composer of Liturgical and Israeli Music
Former, Musical Director, Great Synagogue, Tel[Aviv
Now, at Beth AbrahamSynagogue, Detroit
WILL CHANT THE SABBATH SERVICE
including many of his own- compoistions
assisted by the Hillel Choir, with Mike Robbins, director
in the Zwerdling-Cohn Chapel
29 Hill StAll Are Welcome

*,

CINEMA
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14

_ ____ _ _.

presents

"big sister"

program

PART TWO
of the

0

Everyone else--

H ITCHCOCK
TRILOGY

to work on the I HA
Orientation Committee

VERTIGO

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TECHN ICOL

OR
KI

JAMES

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STEWART NOVAK
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AU D. A

SOON

USE OF THIS COLUMN FOR AN.
NOUNCEMENTS is available to officially
recognized and registered student orga-
nizations only. Frms are available in
Room 1011 SAB.
Guild House, Tues. evening tea hour
March 29, 9-10:30 p.m., 802 Monroe.
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MEN'S GLEE CLUB

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Saturday, April

2

...8:30 P.M.

announce

That the script,

lyrics and

music for the original
production of MUSKET'S

rrSipercali fragiisticeexpeallagleeclib"~

El

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- \JI'4 f /y---7 -.,. _------.--- - - -

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