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January 12, 1966 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-01-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY'

WEDNESDAY JANCTARV 12 14411

THE MICHIGAN DAILY WFfl1%TI~flAV YAT'.7TTAI~V I') ICflA

IL/fZI .0 Mil UtlIbZ I-'. j.Ybb

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To Explain Chance
For Study in England

-_ _ ,._

i - ,

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i

The Engineering Council and Vulcans
Honorary Proudly Present
THE BRILLIANT SOUND OF
+ vg ir JqI n C o n c e r t a t ll A u xdit o r iu m

PAUL SHENAR (above), stars as Brother Julian in The American Conservatory Theatre production
of Edward Albee's play "Tiny Alice."
Provocative Exciti Drama:
ACT.Presents 'Tiny Alice

By DAVE KNOKE
John Vaizey, visiting professor
of economics at the University of
California who is characterized as
"Angry Young Man of Worches-
ter" for his outspoken views on
education, will be the keynote
speaker in a series oftorientation
lectures designed to acquaint stu-
dents with asprogram of inter-
disciplinary study in G r e a t
Britain.
Vaizey wil speak on "Social
Class and University Opportunity"
at 7:30 p.m. Thursday in Aud D,
Angell Hall. It is expected that he
will welcome questions after his
speech about the opportunities for
university students to study in
residence in London under the
interdisciplinary program develop-
ed by the University's School of
Education and the political sciedice
and speech departments of the
literary college.
Theprogram of under graduate
study, also open to graduate stu-
dents, will extend from four to
six weeks during May and June.
Students may elect up to six hours
in education, speech and political
science under thegdirection of
Professors Claude Eggersten and
Irvin Anderson of the School of
Education, Herbert Hildebrandt of
the speech dept. and Lionel Laing
of the political science dept.
Observe British Institutions
Rather than classroom work, the
program will give the students an
opportunity to observe British in-
stitutions in action and become
acquainted with contemporary
leaders in British education and
public life.
According to Eggersten, Vaizey,
a fellow at Worcester College,
Ozford, and friend of Prime Min
ister Wilson, is coming here to
give, among other things, several
addresses to "dramatically call
attention to the program." Vaizey
will also speak early on Thursday,
at 4:00 p.m. in Trueblood Aud;
and on "Optimum Use of Re-
sources for Education," 8:00 p.m.
Friday, East Conference Rm.,
Rackham.
AIRPORT
LIMOUSINES
for information call
.663-8300
Tickets are available
at Travel Bureaus or
the Michigan Union

Participation in the interdisci-
plinary program is open to any
student at the University regard-
less of field of concentration. "We
still have places open for addi-
tional students who would like to
go during the first half of the
third semester," Hildebrandt said.,
Same Tuition Rates
Students will pay the same rates
for tuition as they do at the
University for summer half term
and will live in the Imperial Ho-
tel, Russell Square. Their class-
room will be the whole of Lon-
don. Plans call for visits to the
British Parliament, Oxford. and
Cambridge universities, the BBC,
and various courts, and theaters.
Evening sessions will be spent lis-
tening to addresses by British
authorities.
Eggertsen indicated that the
University's trimester system is
helpful in allow the unique inter-
disciplinary program to be sched-
uled.
Students will be able to go by
plane or ship, provided they make
their own arrangements to and
from the ports. Average cost for
the venture last year came to
under $650 per student.
£i1
DIAL 8-6416

Jo n. 15, 1966

8:30 P.M.

TICKETS: $2.75, $2.25, $1.75
BLOCK ORDERS to S.G.C. by 3:00 P.M. Jan. 10! 1966
GENERAL SALES Beginning Wednesday, Jan. 1 2, 1966 . . at 8:00 A.M.

U -----______

LAST CHANCE
LECTURE
DR. SHAW LIVERMORE, JR.

4

Associate Professor of
History, will give a "Last
Chance Lecture" (as if
this were his lost chance
to speak to students) on
Thursday, January 13, in
the UGLI Multipurpose
Room at 4:15 P.M.

Byl GAIL BLUMBERG
and FRITZ MILLER
The American Conservatory
Theatre (ACT) made its Ann Ar-
bQr, debut last ,night in Edward'
Albee's "Tiny Alice," without doubt
the most provocative piece of
drama to be presented at this
University; indeed one of the most
contrqversial and dynamic offer-
ings to the contemporary Aineri-
can stage.
Albee's play presents no easy
answers and raises many ques-
tions, works not on one theme
but on an accumulation of many.
He explores, centrally, the neces-
sity of the destruction of mhan-
created illusions; the continuous
and agonizing probing for the na-
ture of reality, as tenuous and in-
determinate as it may be.
ORGANIZATION
NOTICES

For Albee, the stage becomes a
battleground for this struggle; the
Ictors sparring, feinting and some-
times hitting with their constant
barrage of verbal thrusts. In his
skillful and -rapid juxtaposition of
vounding insights and-healing wit,
Albee condenses the experience of
contemporary existence and inten-
sifies one's perceptions of it.
More specifically, Albee focuses
his^ search, for truth; in "Tiny
lklice" on'the nature and existence
of a creator, which seems con-
tingent upon man's existence.
"God created man in his own im-
age and man, being a gentleman,
returned the compliment."
Albee seems to be saying that
there is no God other than a crea-
tive abstraction, Alice (not Miss
Alice), the "Earth-mother," who
is given tangible instantiation by
Iman, an arbitrary nature which
much fall within the limits of his
understanding.
The ultimate reality' to Albee is
that instead of God there is this
abstraction and man cannot serve
an abstraction. It is man's in-
ability to accept a world, or even
to conceive of a world, based on

The play is, as explained, a
complex allegory, full of symbols;
even the characters are symbols,
and consequently their develop-
ment as people is shallow and
subsurvient to their development
as symbols of people, and ideas.
Miss Alice (DeAnn Mears) is
really three people, capable of the
spontaneous mood changes Albee
encorporates into his "dramatic
battle," and Miss Mears handled
these dramatic reversals with the
ease and aplomb of putting on her
mask; Julian (Paul Shenar) was
given a deeply moving interpre-
tation, a sustained characteriza-
tion of the innocent martyr.
The only quibble with presen-
tation is directed toward the
Cardinal (Harry Frazier), whose
performance appeared unoriginal
and overdone.
We dcannot urge you strongly
enough to see this play. It is a
memorable theatrical experience
Patronize the
Daily Advertisers

ii

This series of lectures is sponsored by the
University Activities Center

HELD

1 t -

4

- ~1

OVER!
It's
Murderously
Funny

Direct From Its Roadshow Engajement
SPECIAL POPULAR PRICES
SPECIAL SCHEDULED PER FORMANCES

4!

MATINEES ..... 1:15-3:50
NIGHTS ........6:30-9:00

UE OFlTHIS CO.LUMIN FORAN- this premise which drives him to
.NUNCEMENTS 18 available to officially
recognized and registered student or create a God to fit his limited
ganizatidns only. Organizations who are perceptual needs. It is Brother Jul-
plannin tAo be, actVe for' the Spring 1an's inability to accept this fact
Term mlust be registered- in the Office -
of Student Organ~iza.tions by Jan27 that leads to his destruction in the
1966.. Forms are a.vailable in~ Room '1011V play. Ftor Albee implies that 'it'is
* * * only through an acceptance of this
Bahai Student Group, Fireside dis- reality that man can be truly free.

the emiu players present
TlE PIIYSICISTS
january 12-16I

I

Fri.,
welco
Join
ing, J
Lute
Jan. 1:
Univ
Affair
by Pr
Jan.1
Room.

n, "The Bahal Peace Program," e
Jan. 14, 8 p.m., 3545 SAB. All Albee's method of presentation
Mme.isunsaan fothrastpt
* * * successful, with the exception of
t Judiciary Council, Regular meet- the last 'scene which was over-
ran. 12, 7:15 p.m., '3rd Floor, SAB. written. The last act was re-
, : . written. several times and the
2, 0 p m.. Hil at Forest Ave. printed version of the play differs
* . *- from that originally presented on
vehsity Activities Center, Academic Broadway and that seen last night.
s Committee, Last Chance Lecture Even considering the abstruse na-
'of, Shaw Livermore -Jr., Thurs.. ture of the play; the overlong
., ending did not seem functional.

quirk auditorium

tickets $1.50

for reservations phone HU 2-3453
concerned with clearly expressing the problem
of Our tunes."-NEW YORK TIMES
- - - - - - - - - -f

I

I

Mat. $1.25. Eves, & Suu. $.59

4th WEEK
Shown Today thru Thuars.
at 1:304 :00-6:30-9:05
Shown Fri. & Sat. at
12:15-2:25-4:30-6:50 & 9:15

Special Retreat for College Men
St. Paul of the Cross Retreat House
23333 Schoolcraft, Detroit
A weekend of rest, discussion, fun, spiritual
rejuvenation, and mental relaxation.
Fri., Feb. 4, 6:30 P.M. 'til Sun., Feb. 6, 4:00 P.M.
Write or call KE 5-9563 for information
and or reservations.

JOSEPH E. LEVINE Product on
presents Pouto
MARCELLO MASTROIANNI
URSULA ANDRESS
VTTIM
%n EMBASSY PICTURES Release COLOR

"Ii_ ai

Prices This Engagement Only
Week Day Matinees-$1.25
Nights and Sunday-$1.50
f\
SITUART WITMAN " SARA MILES -JAM ES FOX ALBERID SOROI
}ROBERT MORLEY - GERT FROBE " JEAN-PIERRE CASSE1
IRIWA DEMIC~K - RIC SYKES. and T.ERRY'1IHMAS
Special Guest Star RED SKELON in
5
}*
Co-Starring BE~'IfY HI[L YOJIRD I3f IfHARA FLORA ROBSOT
KARL MICHAEL VOGLER SAM WAM AMAKER and TONY HANCOCK
Poduced by SANT AR ES - eced by KEN ANNAKIN #iten by JA OONS and KIN ANNAKIN
COLOR by DE LUXE- CINEMASCOPE
Ar '

0

-1

I

TONIGHT AT 8:00 P.M.

' SEAN CONNERY,
t 'THUNXDE]R ALL
1 I
r 1
1 1
1 r
1 1
1'FREE SHOWIG
* TONIGHT at _7 and 9 P.M.
I t
' r
1 r
* r
Josef Von. Sternberg's
1 r
1 1
r r
r I
IS' A WOMANv

PTP

ppejeh t4

A.C.T.
AMERICAN CONSERVATORY
, THEATRE

I

PROFESSIONAL THEATRE
PROGRAM £

*:

Post-Performance
PANEL
TONIGHT!

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