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March 20, 1966 - Image 12

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The Michigan Daily, 1966-03-20

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PAGE EIGHT

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, MARCH 20, 1966

,AEE-TTEMCIA AIYSNAMRH2,16

LABOR AHEAD:
Conservatives Pose Minimal
Opposition in British Election

Policy Changes Part of De Gaulle Master Plan

tI

LONDON ()-Edward Richard
George Heath faces the acid test
of a national election only eight
months after taking command of
Britain's d i v i d e d Conservative
party.
Both friend and critic wonder if
he is sufficiently blessed with that
"divine spark" of leadership the
late Sir Winston Churchill said
any chieftain, political or military,
needed for success.
The March 31 balloting shapes
up as a personal conflict between
Heath and Prime Minister Harold
Wilson, leaders of the two major
parties, despite their avowed in-
tention of keeping personalities
out of the campaign.
Opinion polls and some pundits
put Wilson and his Labor party
out in front. A commentator for
Conservative newspaper has
sid: "The Conservatives are at
great rick of overwhelming defeat
at the next general election."
This commentator, Ronald Butt,
writing in the Financial Times,

said the Tories have failed to con-
vince the "floating voters," those
who owe no formal allegiance to
any party, that the Conservative
party defends their interests.
These voters, most of them un-
der 40 years of age, "see the
Conservatives as still largely a
party representing the well-to-do,"
Butt said.
The London Times estimates
these uncommitted voters consti-
tute 35 per cent of the electorate.
The Conservatives s e l e c t e d
Heath as leader in an attempt to
give a new look to Britain's oldest
party, the party of Britain's land-
ed aristocracy and industrial ty-
coons, of such political giants as
Pitt the Younger, Disraeli, Sir
Robert Peel and Churchill.
They passed over others who
stood higher in party councils and
chose a man as much like Wilson
as they could find.
Physically, the two men are
similar. They were born 50 years
ago: Wilson March 11, 1916;

Heath July 9, 1916.
Both are above average height,1
Heath an inch or so taller; bothj
have silvery hair and are full-
faced, heavyset.
Both come from powerful mid-
d'e class--Wilson the son of an
industrial chemist, Heath the son1
of an industrial carenter. Neither;
has large financial means.
Both Heath and Wilson had'
brilliant scholastic records and
both 2epresent the new type of
British politician: hard-working,
well informed and masters of the
technical details of government
and politics.
Wilson has shown himself a
master parliamentarian. H e a t h
has faced up to Wilson's steely
barbs and thrusts with difficulty
in House of Commons debates.
In addition, the prime minister
has produced what has come to be
called the "politics of perpetual
motion." One Conservative jour-
nal has complained that Wilson
produces next week's issue while
the opposition is still trying to
catch up with last week's.
Heath took over the party lead-
ership from Sir Alec Douglas-
Home at a time when the Tories
were deeply divided on a host of
issues and clashing personalities.
Some feel much of present-day
Tory disarray stems from Prime
Mirister H a r o l d Macmillan's
choice of Douglas-Home to suc-
cee-i him in October 1963. Many
in the party believed others, not-
ably the then deputy prime min-
isi er, Richard A. Butler, were more
suited.
Party leaders are also divided
over Rhodesia, economic policy,
national defense and. foreign af-
fairs. One group, led by the Mar-
quess of Salisbury, opposes sanc-
tions against the Rhodesian re-
gime although the party supports
the Labor government's action to
bring down the rebellion.

AP News Analysis1
French President Charles de
Gaulle may well dismay his allies;
with shock policy decisions because
at 75, he 'feels he hasn't a great
deal of time left in which to at-
tain his objective: a France dom-
inant in Europe and powerful in
the world's councils.
His planned withdrawal from
the North Atlantic Treaty Organi-
zation's military structure and
his eviction notice to its headquar-
ters and to U.S. bases in France
are part of his grand design. So,
for that matter, is his insistence
on France having an independent
nuclear force. All are in keeping
with his desire to make his coun-
try dependent on no one.
He announced that foreign bases
on French soil would have to be
under French command and set
1969 as the latest date for ac-
complishment of this. Then sud-
denly his timetable was stepped
up and he told the world he was
pulling *his forces out of NATO
and that their bases in France
should be removed.
A switch in tactics is not new
and de Gaulle uses this method
to keep critics off balance and
opponents baffled. Many of his ac-
tions appear paradoxical, but this
apparently causes him no concern.
" He is pulling out of NATO's
military structure but he wants
to stay in the council which creat-
ed it.
* He thinks war in Europe is
now so remote a possibility that
NATO has outlived itsIusefulness.
Yet he has his scientists and mil-
itary busy building a hydrogen

bomb. In the latter connection, he
refuses to sign the nuclear test
ban. He feels it was created only
after the atomic powers had their
weapons.
* He will have nothing to do
with disarmament except on his
terms: destruction of all atomic
weapons and the means to deliver
them. This is generally regarded
as an unrealistic approach to a vi-
tal problem.
* He has kept Britain bewilder-
ed with his about-faces on the
Common Market. First he thought
it was all right to have her as a
partner. Then he vetoed the idea.
Now he seems to be for it again.
These twists and turns should
not be taken as the result of a man
trying to move in several direc-
tions at once in broad and aim-
less fashion. De Gaulle knows what
he wants and where he wants to
go.
His next trip is to Moscow and
speculation is once more rife that
he plans some sort of agreement
with the Soviet Union. But high
French officials state categorically
he will make no arrangements or
treaties there,
Yet, Soviet Ambassador Valer-
ian A. Zorin told a luncheon meet-
ing last Thursday the Soviet Un-
ion would welcome a French-Rus-
sian non-aggression pact. The So-
viet Union, he said, would sup-
port "anything of this kind ac-
ceptable to France."
He talks grandly of a Europe
from "the Atlantic to the Urals,"

bringing Russia
he undoubtedly
is a realist who
ogical utopia isf
zon and may
view.

into Europe, and
means it. But he
knows this ideol-
far over the hori-
never come into

He thinks the postwar domin-
ance of the United States has led
to a deadening paternalism and
thus attacks the presence of Amer-
ican business influence in France.
He chides at the dollar and calls
for a return to the gold standard,
criticizes the fact that NATO is
integrated-and with an Ameri-
can general in overall charge.

He says he doesn't want to be
so attached to the United States
that France would be dragged into
American conflicts. And yet, dur-'
ing the Cuban missile crisis he
was the first to declare himself
solidly on the side of the United
States.
This is paradox to many, but not
to Charles de Gaulle. It offered
him a fine opportunity to demon-
strate what he means when he
says he wants to get out of NATO
but still be an ally.
His NATO pull-out and actions
against U.S. bases and military

headquarters support such free-
dom. He goes to Moscow in June
unhampered by NATO's military
alliance and obviously a loner
in the Western camp. French of-
ficials deny the visit played any
part in his accelerated decision.
And if Red China views his trip
with suspicion, it may have been
partly soothed by a minor piece of
action in Paris last week. De
Gaulle's police evicted the Nation-
alist Chinese from their former
embassy quarters. It may have
been coincidence, but he rarely
overlooks a bet.

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English Actress Presents
Exciting Picture of Africa

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By MARCIA WICK
English actress Marcia Corvin
appearing Friday night at the
League in cooperation with the
UAC Creative Arts Festival, pro-
vided her audience with a stim-
ulating picture of Africa. Miss
Corvin's dramatic reading consist-
ed of selected portions of Danish
author Karen Blixen's "Out of Af-
rica," an autobiographical account*
of her years spent farming in
the East African highlands.
Miss Blixen, perhaps better
known by her nom de plume Isak
Dinesen, has written an absorbing
tale of her life in Kenya. High-
lighting the book are vivid de-
scriptions of the highlands and
excellent character portrayals
which have been incorporated in-
to Miss Corvin's program. Except
for a lack of transitional devices
between incidents, Miss Corvin's
edited version of "Out of Africa"
held together well and gave the
audience a fairly accurate idea of
the author's impressions.
However, once past the script,
the recital ran into difficulties.
Miss Corvin's voice, slightly rem-
iniscent of Jean Simmon's soft
British drawl, was pleasant to
listen to at first, but later seem-
ed unnatural, as her speech be-
came overly excited and emotion-
al at times, and at other times,
overly pathetic and pitiable.
While Miss Corvin seemed en-
thusiastic and appeared to enjoy
her work, stage presence was con-
spicuously lacking. Miss Corvin's
gestures and stage movements
were often ineffectual, quite
abrupt, and unmeaningful to the
audience. These were accompan-
ied by extraneous movements that
continually distracted the audi-
ence and made it impossible for
one to lose oneself in the vivid
imagery of author Blixen's prose.
The viewer could not ignore, for
example, Miss Corvin's slipping
shoulder strap, or the stray wisps
of hair that she found necessary
to pat back into place without fail.
If Miss Corvin's performance
lacked finesse, the text of "Out of
Africa" made up for this short-
coming. Born in Denmark in 1914,
Miss Blixen married a Swedish
cousin and accompanied him to
Kenya, where they establishd a
coffee plantation. These memoirs
were, in her own words, "writ-
ten to -wile away the rainy sea-
son."
'.Fascinated by Africa and its in-
habitants, she compared herself to
a person who has an ear for mu-
sic, but does not discover the won-
ders of it until the prime of his
life. She indeed captured the "mu-
sic of Africa" in her descriptions
of the tall, slim, proud natives,
for example, and the giraffes that
reminded her of long-stemmed
flowers, and the drought that
seemed to be "the negation of all
'weather."
Miss Corvin, perhaps initially
attracted to this work because she
at one time also lived on a farm
in Kenya, stresses that she chose
to use this work for two reasons.
ACTION!
LEE HORNBERGER
SUPPORTS THE FOLLOWING
MOTIONS WHILE A,
MEMBER OF SGC:
" Student Bookstore Proposal
" Student Housing Association
* Principle of Student
Participation in Selecting of
Next U of M President

First, in her opinion, author Blix-
en is "certainly one of the most
outstanding women writers of our
century. In addition, she feels that
these members have "universal
values" that are applicable to all
twentieth-century men.
Miss Corvin's performance would
undoubtedly have been improved
had she not been hampered by
performing in the stage-less Van-
denberg Room of the League. She
admitted that she felt too inti-
mately tied to the audience during
her recitation and that the nature
of the dramatic reading demanded
a stage.

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