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March 20, 1966 - Image 11

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-03-20

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SUNDAY, MARCH 20, 1966

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FAGS SEVEN

_. IHGNDIY ~'~~1v~

A L7uL UL' V A;, IN

Texas Western mins Title

'NIT TOURNEY:
Brigham Young Mauls NYU

COLLEGE PARK, Md. (M'-In-
spired Texas Western, led by the
gymnastic efforts of little Bobby
Joe Hill, toppled top-ranked
Kentucky 72-65 last night and
captured the National collegiate
basketball championship t h a t
Kentucky Coach Adolph Rupp
wanted to add to his collection of
four ethers.
Duke won the game for third
place, beating Utah 79-77.
Hill, a 5-foot-10 bacKcourt man,
scored 20 points, most of them in
clutch situationsr and many of
spectacular drtving lay, ups that
brought to mind the hey day of
Bob Cousy.
Poised Team
In the end, it was Texas West-
ern's vaunted defense and surpris-
ing poise that won the big one.'

Kentucky, on the other hand,
noted for its finesse and discipline
under the legendary coaching of
Rupp, was kept off balance
throughout and was guilty of a
shocking number of lapses, mis-
takes, bad passes and mental
errors.
Texas Western, once a little
mining school just across the bor-
der from Mexico, was making its
first appearance ever in the na-
tional final under young Coach
Don HIaskixns but didn't let the
pressure bother it a bit.
iree Throws Provide Edge
The Miners, calmly dropped in
28 of 34 free throws and that-
along with the rebounding of
their strong front line-was the
difference.
Kentucky led only once, and

that was 1-0.
A moment later big Dave Latin
jammed in a field goal and made
it a three-pointer when he con-
verted the following four shots.
The Miners never trailed after
that.
The turning point came early
in the second half after Kentucky
had closed to within one point at
46-45. The Miners replied with
six straight points-four of them
on free throws--for a 52-45 lead
that never was seriously chal-
lenged.
Believe 5'6"?!
Willie Worsley, a 5'6" sopho-
more substitute who was a sur-
prise starter and proved to be a
perfect running mate for Hill, hit
on three of three foul shots in the
important sti eak. The closest
Kentucky get after that was 54-
51, but a set shot by Hill, a jump-
er by Orston Artis and a Lattin
stuff-tip made it 60-51 with 6:40
left, and the Miners had it in the
bag.
Kentucky simply could do no
right. The Wildcats, whose only
other loss in 29 games was a
meaningless 69.62 upset by Ten-
nessee, was able to hit on only 27
of 70 field goal attempts--a dis-
mal 38.6 per cent.
Tenacious Disturbing
Texas Western was good on 22
of 49 from the floor and comple-
mented the performarice with a
tenacious, disturbing man-to-man
defense that occasionally develop-
ed into a full court press.
That press was best demonstrat-

ed in the early going when within
a 1! -second span Hill twice swiped
the ball in the Kentucky back-
court and went ii for easv layups.
Duke Stops Utah
In the consolation game, Duke's
Blue Devils held off a closing ral-
ly by Utah and beat the Utes
79-77, despite a record breaking
scoring total by Utah's Jerry
Chambers.
Chambers, an underrated 6-
foot-4 senior, scored 32 points in
Utah's losing cause, giving him a
total of 143 and breaking the old
NCAA four-game tournament rec-
ord of 141 held by Clyde Lovel-
lette.
Heavy Favorite
Duke, ranked second in the na-
tion and a heavy favorite over
unranked Utah, almost blew a late
11-point lead.
Chambers set the stage for the
high drama when he closed the
gap to one-point 78-77 with a
short jumper with 37 seconds left.
Seconds later he grabbed a re-
bound, and Utah moved down to
attempt the winning field goal.
Psyched Out
But Ute substitute Ben Black
drew a foul and went to the line
on a one-and-one situation with
seven seconds to go. Duke imme-
diately called time out. Again he
went to the foul line-and again
Duke called time out.
By the time the second time out
was over, Black was so nervous
he wiped his sweaty palms on the
referee's jersey, then missed the
shot.

NEW YORK (A') - Jim Jimas
took over for ace Dick Nemelka
and sparked a spurt at the start
of the second half that carried
Brigham Young .to a 97-84 basket-
ball victory over New York Uni-
versity yesterday in the finals of
the National Invitation Tourna-
ment.
The title is the second for the
Cougars, whose 1951 team won the
NIT in its first appearance. NYU
was seeking its first crown in
eight appearances, but could get
only its second runner-up finish.
Villanova won third place by

defeating Army 76-65 behind theI
29-point performance of Bill Mel-'
chionni.
Jimas came into the game for
Nemelka, who has averaged 24
points a game, when the six-foot
guard drew his fourth personal
with 1:45 left in the first half.
The 6-1 sub started the second
half and scored the Cougars' first
point on a free throw. He then
passed to Craig Raymond for a
layup and scored himself on a
jump shot, taking Brigham Young
from a five-point halftime ad-
vantage to a 53-45 lead.
Runaway
With Raymond dominating the
boards and Jeff Congdon passing
brilliantly, the Cougars went on
from there to make a runaway of
the contest. The top-seeded West-
erners led by 17 points late in the

second half.
Stan McKenzie kept NYU on
the scoreboard, getting 19 of the
Violets' last 23 points. However,
the best he could do was get the
Violets to within 10 points, 82-72,
with 5:21 remaining.
The 6-foot-11 Raymond scored
21 points, hitting on 10 of 14 shots
from the field. He also grabbed 18
rebounds and kept NYU from get-
ting too close to the basket.
23 for McKenzie
McKenzie was the Violets' high
scorer with 27 points while Steve
Kramer added 20 for Brigham
Young.
The Cougars, runners-up in the
Western Athletic Conference, fin-
ished the season with a 20-5 rec-
ord. NYU, which had won eight of
nine games going into the final,
finished at 18-10.

CAUSE OF ALL
THE TROUBLE

FERNDALE KING:o
In Class A Finals

Habs Increase Lead;
Leafs Trim Hawks
By The Associated Press Larose broke a 1-1 tie at 3:43
MONTREAL - Second period of the second period, batting his
goals by Claude Larose, Claude own rebound past Ranger goalie
Provost and Bobby Rousseau car- Cesare Maniago into the left-hand
ried the Montreal Canadiens toa corner of the net.
6-2 victory over the New York Provost scored his second goal
Rangers last night. of the game and 18th of the sea-
The triumph enabled the Cana- son at 11:55 when his pass from
diens to increase their National behind the net hit a Ranger de-
Hockey League lead to three points fender and slithered past Man-
over the second-place Chicago iago.
Black Hawks, who were beaten by Rousseau, converting passes from
Toronto. Henri Richard and Dave Balon, put
Montreal in front 4-1 just 64 sec-
onds later.

NOBODY TOOK ANY PICTURES of. Texas Western this sea-
son. The Miners, unknown and unheralded for most of the
season made the photographers and Adolph Rupp sorry last
night stopping Kentucky and Pat Riley, 72-65. Here Riley clicks
on his accurate jump shot against Dayton in the regionals last
weekend. Riley led the Wildcats in defeat last night, scoring 19
points.
COLD'-ELLIOTT:

Special To The Daily
EASTLANSING-Five overtime
free throws, four of them by
Dwight Dunlap, gave Ferndale a
65-60 triumph over Ann Arbor in
the Michigan Class A high school
basketball championship game
played here last night..
Ann Arbor, sparked by sharp
shooting Earle Higgins had come
from six points down late in the
game to tie the score on Tim
Wadham's 25-foot jump shot with
less than a minute to play.
But Dunlap hit four free throws
in the first minute of the over-
time, putting the Eagles into the
dominating position. He also con-
nected on a jumper with 10 sec-
onds left for the final five point
margin. Dunlap finished as the
game's leading scorer with 31
points, closely followed by Hig-
gins with 30.
The difference, though, lay in
SCORES
Exhibition Baseball
New York (n) 8, Cincinnati 7
(13 innings)
Pittsburgh 3, Philadelphia 2
Detroit 3, Bosto'n 2
Minnesota 12, washington 8
Kansas City 6, St. Louis 4
Chicago (a) 6, New York (a) 4
California 4, San Francisco 1
Los Angeles 8, Houston 3
Baltimore 6, Atlanta 3
NBA
Boston 126, New York 113
St. Louis 115, Detroit 112
Philadelphia 127, Cincinnati 121
NHL
Montreal 6, New York 2
Toronto 4, Chicago 2
College Hockey
NCAA Tournament
Championship
Michigan State 6, Clarkson 1
Third Place
Denver 4, Boston U. 3
Illinois State High School Tournament
Championship
Thornton 74, Galesburg 60
Third Place
Beleville 72, Decatur 40
Do you want
Professional
Academic Counselors?
DAN OKRENT
DOES!
Vote
SCOPE
SGC Elections-Wednesday

Ferndale's superior 54 per cent
shooting mark from the field. Ann
Arbor shot only 44 per cent.
For Ferndale it was the second
Class A championship in the last
four years. Ferndale had beaten
top rated East Detroit Friday to
enter the championship contest.
Ann Arbor, in the state finals for
the first time since 1917, finished
the season with a 20-3 record, same
as Ferndale.
The Class B title went to Grand
Rapids East Christian which stop-
ped River Rouge 76-66. L'Anse beat
Flint Holy Redeemer 89-70 for
Class C honors and Covert stop-
ped Trout Creek for its second
consecutive Class D title.
TV RENTALS
Lowest Rates,
Student-Specials
HI-FI STUDIO
1319 S. Univ NO 3-7242

MONDAY NIGHT-MARCH 21
8:00 P.M.-Multipurpose Rio., UGLI
UNIVERSITY LECTURE.
"IS A CREATIVE JEWISH CULTURE
POSSIBLE IN AMERICA?"
LEO W. SCHWARZ
Editor (The Jewish Caravan, et. al.); former Director of
Jewish Displaced Persons Operations in Germany; publisher
(Psychiatry and -Religious Experience, Human Values in
Jewish Literature, et. al.); author; lecturer (U.S., Canada,
England, France, Germany, Israel, Rhodesia, South Africa);
presently Visiting Professor of Judaic Studies at the Univer-
sity of Iowa.
Sponso red by The Univ~ersity of Michigan,
Office of Religionis Affairs

I

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U

Griders Scrimmage i0Wn

By DAVE WEIR
Despite a frigid wind blowing in
from the north, the intrasquad
football scrimmage went through
as scheduled yesterday on Ferry
Field..
The gridders had practiced dur-
ing the week as platoons working
on their' specialized duties, and
yesterday's scrimmage was their
first organized contact work.
Head coach Bump Elliott sub-
stituted freely into the lineups,
giving just about every player on
the 90-member spring roster a
chance to see action. The two
teams, following tradition, were
distinguishable only by their blue
and white jerseys.t'
, Blue Lettermen
Returning lettermen dominated
the Blue squad, while sophomores-
to-be and non-lettermen carried
the brunt of the load for the
Whites. No score was kept, but
both teams crossed thej goal line
frenquently.
One of the primary objectives,
besides accruing an over-all eval-
uation of the team, was recording
various plays and players on film
for future reference for the coach-
es. This was frustrated, however,
by a mulfunctioning photograph-
ing system.
No Amps
"We weren't able to get any
current due to an unknown elec-
trical failure in the apparatus,"
explained Elliott.
But, notwithstanding the cold or
the camera breakdo vn, the coach-
es did. have a chance to see the
gridders under semi-game condi-
tions. The fulcrum of the entire
scriamage, as usual, was the quar-
terbacking.
Dicke Vidmer, who shared signal-

calling duties with Wally Gabler'
last fall, took turns with fresh-
man Bob Kieta yesterday for the
Blue squad. Freshman Dennis
Brown and sophomore J o h n
Thomas quarterbacked for the
Whites.
Volk Sits Out
Rick Volk, the other contender
for the field general spot, did not
participate in the scrimmage. "He
isn't ready for any contact work
yet," commented Elliott. "We don't
want to take any chances on his
knee "
Asked about the improvement of
the contenders, Elliott said, "It's
hard to tell this early, but every
body seems to be coming along
fine. We are just giving the guys
a chance at the job and we'll see
what happens."
According to, Elliott, the cold
weather reduced the effectiveness
of the practice session. "Every-
thing was coming along fine
through Thursday, u n t i l the
weather changed. It's hard to
evaluate the various performances
out there today because it was the
first time the boys had to handle
the ball in cold weather."
Some of the bright spots of the
scrimmage were a few long passes
and several good runs. Brown hit.
Don Rice on a bomb for one'
touchdown. Fullback Tim RadiganI
made several beautiful runs off
tackle after taking pitchouts on
the old Detwiler patterns.
Minutes later, John Rowser ran
around left end for a nice gain,j
but fumbled when he was tackled.
Obviously disturbed by his miscue,
Rowser brc ke into the open oA the
next play and grabbed a bullet
pass from Kieta.
Jolly Tony Mason, offensive line

coach, kept things lively with his
irrepressible wit, by jumping in
and out of the huddles and keep-
ing up a steady stream of chatter.
When a quarterback fumbled the
hike, Mason shrieked, "Way to
move the ball! That's the way to
move it!" When several would-be
tacklers failed to stop a single
runner, Mason offered comfort,
"Way to almost make the stop,
boys . . . keep slowing him down."
Probably the best sound of the
day was that final whistle which
sent the team to the locker room,
and away from the cold.

* * *
TORONTO-George Armstrong
and Frank Mahovlich triggered a
three-goal burst in the opening
period, leading the Toronto Ma-
ple Leafs to a 4-2 victory over
Chicago last night that dampened
the Black Hawks' National Hockey
League title hopes.
The loss ended a three-game
Chicago winning streak and drop-
ped the second place Hawks three
points behind league-leading Mon-
treal, which beat New York 6-2.
The Hawks have six games to
play, one less than the Canadiens.
Third place Toronto, now six
points behind the Hawks, shot to
a 4-0 lead before the visitors broke
through veteran goalie Johnny
Bower in the second period on Red
Hay's goal. The 41-year-old Bower,
making his first start in two
weeks after a series of injuries,
thwarted Bobby Hull's bid to add
to his season record of 53 goals.

Y::.
":i{:
:.1±
..ti
":ti
::1.

JOINT
JUDICIARY
COUNCIL
PETITIONING-MARCH 14 to MARCH 21
FIVE ONE-YEAR TERMS
ONE HALF-YEAR TERM
CLOSES MONDAY AT 5
1011 SAB-OFFICE OF STUDENT ORGS.

SPORTS NIGHT EDITOR:
RICK STERN

u

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LAKEHEAD UNIVERSITY
PORT ARTHUR, ONTARIO

The University is in the process of expanding rapidly, and we invite
applications from qualified faculty members, civil servants and others for
the followng positions:
Assistant and Associate Professors of ECONOMICS
Assistant and Associate Professor of GEOGRAPHY
Asistant Professor of POLITICAL SCIENCE
Associate Professor of SOCIOLOGY
Lecturer and Associate Professor of ENGLISH
Please write to me, enclosing a personal data sheet and the names
of three references.
W. G. TAMBLYN, PRESIDENT

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