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March 18, 1966 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-03-18

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PAGE EIGH7

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, MARCH 18, 1966

PAGE EIGH'3 TIlE MICHIGAN DAILY FRIDAY. MARCH 18. 1~B6

U I

Flashy Infield Predicted for Michigan

-

g.g
i
1

JOINT
JUDICIARY

By GRAYLE HOWLETT
In the days of nickel beer and
free lunches the Philadelphia
"A's" had their celebrated $100,000
Infield." In more modern times
the New York Yankees have done
quite well with their own version,
"The Million Dollar Infield" (in-
dicative of rising prices); and
most recently, in the era of
beechwood aging, the St. Louis
Cardinals added their own candi-
date with their fabulous "All-Star
Infield" in 1964.
But even though the Michigan
baseballers have three lettermen
returning to the infield, coach
Moby Benedict says, "No names
please.'
Experience, depth, speed - we
have them all," Benedict explain-
ed, "but it's hard to apply any
one name to this infield. We fin-
ished third in the league in de-
fense last year but we had our
BILLY DAVIS
and
GEORGE ECONOMY
ask you to vote for
DAN OKRENT
VOTE
SCOPE
SGC Elections-Wednesday

C

OUNCIL

problems at third. We'll be better
at third this year with the addi-
tion of Keith Spicer, who trans-
ferred from Detroit University.
Besides, I hate to praise them too
much because I might jinx them."
Double Triple
The Wolverines' double play
combination of Bob Gilhooley to
Ricky Sygar to Chan Simonds
might not be glorified in song and
legend a la Tinkers to Evers to
Chance but they have played a
year together and have proven to
be a cohesive unit.
Captain Gilhooley returns for
his second year at shortstop after
spending his sophomore year in
the outfield. "We look to Gil to
make this club go," Benedict com-
mented "because the kids have
confidence in him. That's why
they elected him captain." Gil-
hooley, a 5'10", 175 pound senior
from Skokie, Ill., batted .279 last
year and scored 35 runs. Last
summer he competed in the Basin
League, a league partially spon-
sored by the major leagues for col-
lege ballplayers.
Keystone Partners
"Bob knows how to play," Bene-
dict said, "and he's done a real
fine job for us. He's got good
speed, probably the best speed on
the ball club, and he has the abil-
ity to steal bases. Defensively, he
can move any way and he goes at
the ball real well. If he has a year
like he had out in the Basin
League, well, we might be all
right."
Gilhooley's partner at the Key-
stone sack is junior Rick Sygar

who has temporarily traded foot-
ball pads and kicking tees for a
bat and mitt. Sygar started at
second base all last year where he
was a magician with the glove but
a little anemic at the plate.
"Rick was outstanding defens-
ively, and quite frankly it was his
glove that kept him in the line-
up," Benedict explained, "but let
me add that when you play a 40
game schedule like ours, streaks
are most important. Rick started
off badly, and the slump hung
with him all year. But in this game
anything can happen. He'll start
getting the bat on the ball."
No StrangerI
Chandler "Chan" Simonds will
man the initial sack and when de-
fensive - minded Benedict t a lk s
about this 5'11", 175 pound junior
a smile comes to his face. "Chan
can handle that glove as well as
any college ballplayer in the na-
tion. If he can get his bat squared
around, he'll have a good year."
Simonds only hit at a .188 clip
last year but he knocked in 13
runs and showed some long ball
potential.
The only position on the infield
not handled by a veteran Wolver-
ine is third base but newcomer
Spicer carries some impressive
credentials. His size, a healthy
6'2" and 200 pounds, is ideal for
the long ball. Benedict agrees: "He
hits with power and runs well for
his size. Even though he is new
on the club, he's no stranger to
me. I've followed him all through
his sandlot career in Detroit.
Don't worry about him on defense.

He moves well to both sides and people never realized that Mel
has a strong arm. All I can say is could play baseball," Benedict
that we are greatly improved at commented, "but he came out for
third." the squad as a freshman. Then he
Bench Threatens decided to devote most of his time

I

Besides a solid starting line-up
in the infield, Michigan boasts a
young, aggressive bench. Doug
Nelson, a sophomore from Adrian,
has the ability to play and his
versatility is an asset. He can play
almost anywhere in the infield or
outfield.
Marty McVey is another sopho-
more who threatens to break into
the starting line-up. McVey, an-
other fugitive from the football
squad, mans the hot corner and
had an excellent high school career
in Odessa, Texas.
Jim Rose, a yearling from Li-
vonia, is also a product of the De-
troit sandlots who is battling hard
to penetrate the starting nine.
Trades in Stick
And last but not least, Mel
Wakabayashi, All-American cen-
ter and captain of the hockey
team, has forsaken his skates-=for
the springtime at least-in order
to concentrate on baseball. "Most
SCORES
BASEBALL RESULTS
Baltimore 7, Washington 2
Houston 7, Boston 2
San Francisco 13, California 1
Atlanta 2, Chicago (A) 0
Chicago (N) 8, Cleveland 6
Detroit 1, Cincinnati 0'
Kansas City 3, Pittsburgh 2
Minnesota 5, New York (A) 1
St. Louis 4, Los Angeles 3
New York (N) 3, Philadelphia 3 (tie)
(15 inn)
BASKETBALL SCORES
NIT
Semifinals
Brigham Young 66, 'Army 60
New York University 69, Vilanova 63
NBA
Boston 128, Detroit 103
Philadelphia 115, New York 106
NHL'
Detroit 4, Boston 2
SPORTS NIGHT EDITOR:
GRETCHEN TWIETMEYER

to hockey and took a leave of ab-
sence. But we're happy to have
him back and I know he'll play
somewhere."
Experience, s p e e d, defensive
ability, and promising power char-
acterize Michigan's 1966 infield.
but kind of keep it under your hat
-you might jinx them.

PETITIONING-MARCH 14 to MARCH 21
FIVE ONE-YEAR TERMS
ONE HALF-YEAR TERM
CLOSES MONDAY AT 5
1011 SAB-OFFICE OF STUDENT ORGS.

p

SCW INC. l

Wakabayashi Honored
As Most Valuable Player

RICK SYGAR

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Michigan will not be participat-
ing in the NCAA hockey cham-
pionships this weekend, but in
spite of this, several Wolverines
received honors for their efforts
this season.
All-American center Mel Waka-
bayashi was named the most valu-
able player in the Western Col-
legiate Hockey Association in a
poll of coaches and sportswriters,
and also won a spot on the Second.
All-League Team. Other Wolver-
ines receiving honorable mention
in the poll were senior defenseman
Ted Henderson and sophomore
goalie Harold Herman.
When asked how he felt about
the awards, Wakabayashi com-
mented, "I can't believe that I

was most valuable player. I really
couldn't take that honor by myself.
But I would have traded any in-
dividual honors for a chance to
play in the NCAA."
The first All-WCHA team. in-
cludes goalie Tony Esposito of
M i c h i g a n Tech, defensemen
Wayne Smith of Denver and
Bruce Riutta of Michigan Tech,
Doug Volmar of Michigan State,
Terry Casey and Dennis Hixtall,
both North Dakota forwards..
On the second team are Waka-
bayashi, goalie John Lothrop of
Minnesota, Bob Hill of Duluth and
Dennis Huculak of Michigan Tech,
Wayne Weller of Michigan Tech
and Gary Gambucci of Minnesota,
forwards.

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IMPORTS
ICR
MEXICAN SUMMER DRESSES
MEXICAN PAPER FLOWERS
C. -'
rugs pottery
We"alsopcho sandtooledpurses
' i- ort ski sweaters golf bags
hand knit coats straw summer
peasant blouses purses
suede skirts wedding shirts
542 E. William Maynard House Phone 665-4701
OPEN SEMINAR ON
MORALS tn LAW
and MEDICINE
Topics: "Abortion"-
"Contraceptives" - "Euthanasia"
WHEN: Tues., Mar. 22 7:30 P.M.-Abortion
Tues., Mar. 29 7:30 P.M.-Contraceptives
Tues, Apr. 5 7:30 P.M.-Euthanasia

SAM'S STORE
Has Levi's galore-
for gals and guys
OVER 2000 PAIRS
IN STOCK
If you want a pair
of LEVI'S
Come to
SAM'S STORE
122 E. Washington Open Monday & Friday Nights
CREATIVE ARTS FESTIVAL
presents a
STUDENT ART EXHIBIT
North Lounge
Michigan Union
March 18-26

4
0

0

WHERE:

Michigan League, Kalamazoo Room
South Ingalls Street

PANEL: (will include)
Prof. B. James George, Jr., U. of M.
Law School
Dr. Carl P. Malmquist, Dept. of Psychiatry
and Child Psychiatry, U. of M.
Medical School
Father Edward Mitchell, Roman Catholic
Chaplain, University Hospital
Prof. Joseph R. Julin, U of M. Law School
The Rev. Paul Light, American Baptist
Campus Center

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