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March 18, 1966 - Image 3

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-03-18

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FRIDAY, MARCH 18,196b

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

vef4-v Itur

FRIDAY, MARCH 18, 196b THE MICHTEAN DAily II A V~ U' N ~U'W

AL~ih* THREW

I

U.S. Supports Ky Regime

Against

Buddhist

2,000 Said
Slin Sine
Midsummer
Report Shows Last
Week's Total Below
Year Record of 240

<4

WASHINGTON (M)-More
2,000 American fighting men
been killed in combat in Viet
and nearly 10,000 wounded
President Johnson ordered
ground units into the war on
scale last midsummer.

than
have
Nam
since
U.S.
a big

A report yesterday of Viet Nam
casualties in the week ending last
Saturday showed 100 U.S. service-
men killed in action, and 808
wounded.
Total
The killed total for that period
was well below the 240 carried as
a record for this year. That fig-
ure was reached in the seven-day
period ending last Nov. 20 and
included casualties in the big Ia
Drang battle near the Cambodian
border.
The wounded total for last week,
though not high, did not set a
record. In the week ended Feb. 28,
the Pentagon, counted up 849
wounded in action.
The new weekly report brought
the over-all roster of U.S. combat
dead in Viet Nam to 2,559 since
Jan. 1, 1961-the point in time
from which the Pentagon charts
the human cost of U.S. involve-
ment in the Viet Nam war.
Roll
The roll of wounded rose to 12,-
706 names in the week ending last
Saturday.
Of these wounded, 168 have sub-
sequently died-a rate of only
about 1.3 per cent. This is the
lowest ever in any U.S. war.
When Johnson ordered the 1st
' Cavalry, Airmobile Division and
other forces into Viet Nam last
July 28, the U.S. death toll up to
that point stood at 536, the
wounded at 2,847.
But until then, U.S. involve-
ment on the ground had been
mostly- in the form of advising
South Vietnamese army and
marine combat outfits, although
the U.S. air war both in South
Viet Nam and over North Viet
Nam had been in full swing for
about six months.
In late July, the United States
had 80,000 U.S. servicemen in
Viet Nam. The total now stands
at better than 215,000.
New Year
Since the new year opened, 939
American servicemen have died in
combat-more than 36 per cent
of the total since the beginning of
1961.
Keeping pace with the deepen-
ing U.S. involvement in the war,
the vast bulk of American casual.
ties-the 12,706 wounded-have
been suffered since the start of
1965.

--Associated Press

THE APPROXIMATE LOCATION of the Gemini 8 landing was
east of Okinawa. The astronauts were forced ;down after having
difficulties with control of their capsule. The astronauts were
taken on board the destroyer Leonard F. Mason.
Tapes Demonstrate
Gemini Difficulties

Lodge Tells
Opponents 1
about View
American Troops
Hunt North Viet Nan
Regulars near Saigon
By The Associated Press
The United States is supporting
the nine-month-old government of
Nguyen Cao Ky against South
Vietnamese opponents who are
pushing for an early end to Sai-
gon's military regime.
Henry Cabot Lodge, the Ameri-
can ambassador in Saigon, was re-
ported yesterday to have made
known the U.S. view to Buddhist
leaders and others on the scene.
The Buddhists have been hold-
ing public rallies demanding quick
replacement of the present mili-
tary rule with civilian authority.
There have been mass demonstra-
tions too, over Ky's ouster of in-
dependent-minded Lt. Gen. Ngu-
yen Chanh Thi as commander of
the 1st Corps in the northern part
of the country.
U.S. View
The U.S. view is that a stable
government in Saigon is of top
importance for winning the cam-
paign against the Communists-
and that turbulent demonstrations
are a bad way of pressing for
political changes. Ky has prom-
ised a new constitution and elec-
tions next year.
Washington is keeping the pres-
sure on Ky to keep moving to-
ward representative government-
and this was part of the endorse-
ment President Johnson gave to
the Ky regime at his Honolulu
meeting with Saigon's leaders last
month.
War Front
On the war front a broad Ameri-
can quest for native Viet Cong
in the D Zone jungles turned into
an urgent hunt yesterday for a
regiment of North Vietnamese reg-
ulars. Intelligence agents said the
regulars were deployed in the
zone only 35 miles north of Sai-
gon.
U.S. B52 jets saturated the sus-
pected staging area with hundreds
of tons of bombs. They struck only
about four miles ahead of the
vanguard of nearly 10,000 troops
slashing paths with machetes and
jungle knives toward a showdown
with the regiment-perhaps 1,2001
men.
This was one of 40 air assaults
in support of Operation Silver
City, a ground drive launched 10I
days ago.

Find Bomb
Near Coast
Of Spain
PALOMARES BEACH, Spain ( P)
-The U.S. midget submarine Al-
vin has found the long and an-
xiously sought hydrogen bomb
that was lost two months ago in
an American bomber-tanker plane
crash over Spain, official sources
said last night.
They reported it was spotted
with its parachute still attached
2,500 feet under the surface of
the Mediterranean Sea, five miles
offshore.
The weapon was reported ap-
parently intact-indicating no
lethal leakage in the waters of
this holiday resort.
Jubilation
There was jubilation from here
to Washington at the apparently
successful conclusion of an in-
tensive, multimillion-dollar search
that occupied thousands of men
for two months and sent diplo-
matic repercussions around the
world.
Officials said it would take upj
to three days for Rear Adm. Wil-
liam Guest's Task Force 65 to
bring the bomb ashore or put it
aboard a search vessel.
Armed warships ringed the area.
Recovery operations were expected
to start Friday morning.
Wednesday'
The official sources said the
Alvin found the weapon Wednes-
day. Directors of the search were
just settling down to a long sweep
of the sea bottom when word of
the contact was flashed from the
sub.

world News Roundup

SINGAPORE ({A'-Thousands of
Indonesian students took to the
streets of Jakarta in anti-
Communist demonstrations yes-
terday and occupied two govern-
ment ministries, informants in
Singapore reported.
The students ignored a broad-
cast plea by President Sukarno
urging the people to cooperate
with the armed forces in restoring
calm and stability to the nation.
The students demanded the
resignation of pro-Communist
members of the Cabinet, includ-
ing Sukarno's right-hand man,
First Deputy Premier Subandrio,
who also is foreign minister.
Resisting
The Singapore sources said the
demonstrations were staged as Su=
karno was reported resisting pres-
sure from the new military regime
to set up a new Cabinet that will

Indonesian Students Protest
In Jakarta, Occupy Ministries

By The Associated Press

k
1
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BONN. Germany - With the
backing of Chancellor Ludwig Er-
hard's government, a West Ger-
man firm has taken the lead in
supplying Red China a $150-
million steel plant.
An informed source said yester-
day the West Germans were told
the United States would rather
other nations followed its own
example of not trading with the
Chinese Communists, but no for-
mal American objection was rais-
ed.
NEW YORK - Police raiding
Harlem's vitriolic Black Arts
Theater have discovered a deadly
arsenal inside the once federally
financed haven for antiwhite
writers and artists.
Striking just before midnight

Wednesday, police rounded up six
men, and charged them with
felonious assault after one shot
was fired. They were held in $1,000
bond each.
One high police official said the
raid thwartedna plot by a fana-
tically militant black nationalist
group which had tried to infiltrate
the theater group.
* * *
HAVANA-Prime Minister Fidel
Castro has started a campaign to
root out "corruptive influences
and capitalist vices" he says are
creeping into Cuba's Communist
regime.
Dozens of officials-including a
deputy minister of the armed
forces-have been arrested and
accused of. irresponsible conduct,
high living or "illegal and vice-
ridden activities."

drop Subandrio.
Subandrio is reported to be de-
tained by the army in a guest
house on the grounds of Sukarno's
Jakarta palace.
The demonstrations-the first
since Sukarno handed over power'
to army chief Lt. Gen. Suharto
Last Saturday-were staged by the
proarmy Kami and Kapi organ-
izations. The first is an organiza-
tion of university students. Kapi
is made up of high school pupils.'
Encouraged
The sources hinted that the stu-
dents are being encouraged and
supported by the new military re-
gime. It wants to use them as a
weapon to force Sukarno to give
in to their demands for a re-
organized Cabinet.
Sukarno in a message to the
Indonesian people Wednesday de-
clared he was still president with1

full powers but admitted that
certain people were trying to
topple him and giving him ultima-
tums on the formation of a Cab-
inet. The sources said these "cer-
tain people" obviously were the
new military regime.
"Myth"
"The new regime wants to main-
tain the myth that Sukarno is still
'the great leader'." one source said.
"But whatever he does, Sukarno
can never go back to what he was
before.
"It really does not matter what
he says now. He can only delay
what the army and people want.
He cannot prevent it."
Bargaining
Informnants predicted there will
be more bargaining with the new
regime by Sukarno for, as one
phrased it, "the regime wants to
make sure that when the new
Cabinet is announced it is an-
nounced by what in fact is their
stooge, Sukarno."
The sources said several hun-
dred students stormed the office
of the minister coordinator for
basic education, Prof. Priyono.
Other students invaded the Min-
istry of Labor where they were
reportedly given the keys to the
building by officials there. About
2,000 students then staged a dem-
onstration outside the Ministry
for Central Bank Affairs.
MICKEY EISENBERG
ask you to vote for
John Kelly
VOTE
SCOPE
SGC Elections--Wednesday

CAPE KENNEDY (CP) - The
Gemini 8 astronauts were riding
a violently tumbling spacecraft
during a hair-raising 30 minutes
in space, tape recorded conver-
sations with the astronauts showed
yesterday.
"We have serious problems here.
We're tumbling end over end,"
command pilot Neil A. Armstrong
told a tracking ship as he emerg-
ed from a communications black-
out over the Pacific.
Emergency
Minutes later, Armstrong said
he had switched to an emergency
control system because he was
unable to do anything with his
main engines.
"We were just barely able to
hold our own," Armstrong report-
ed. "The rates were just too ex-
cessive. After we got the rates
down where we thought we could
undock safely, then we regained
control of the spacecraft slowly."
"Relax. Everything's okay," the
ship controller told the pilots.
Evaluated
The mission control center in
Houston, Tex., evaluated the situ-
ation quickly and told Armstrong
and his space partner, David R.
Scott, to prepare for an emer-
gency re-entry.
The trouble occurred seven
hours into the flight at about 6:40
p.m. They splashed to a landing
in the Pacific 500 miles east of
Okinawa at 10:23 p.m.

Until officials have a chance to
talk with the astronauts, they said
they would not be able to deter-
mine precisely what went wrong.
The National Aeronautics and
Space Administration played the
tapes at a news conference yes-
terday after refusing to allow
newsmen to hear them Wednes-
day night. At that time, officials
said reporters might misinterpret
the astronauts' words and the tone
of their voices.
When the trouble began, the
spacecraft was over Red China
and out of communication range
with ground stations. The ground
got its first indication of the
problem 15 minutes later when
Gemini 8 passed over the tracking
ship in the Pacific.
30 Minutes
Armstrong required about 30
minutes to separate from the
Agena and bring the spinning
spacecraft under control.
Data showed that the space-
craft had separated from the
Agena rocket to which it had
docked only 30 minutes before in
an historic space feat.
The ship asked the astronauts
whether they had separated and
Armstrong replied they were and
then made the comment about the
serious troubles. The ship reported
to flight director John Hodge in
Houston, "He's separated from the
Agena and he's in a roll and can't
stop it. He says he's fired the
RCS squib."
'II

Cautious optimism gave way to£
joy when the first underseas pic-
tures reached headquarters.
Experts who looked at the pic-
tures said there was no doubt it
was the weapon.
Parachute
They said not only did the pic-f
tures show the bomb, intact inI
its casing, but also the attched
parachute. This was a dirty gray
rather than the white used for
personnel.
This word about the parachute
confirmed statements by Spanish
fishermen who said Jan. 17 they
saw "another parachute with what
looked like half a man" fall into
the sea. They had just rescued
four of the men aboard the B52
bomber and its aerial tanker,
which colided in a fueling opera-
tion.
"Everything about the bomb is
highly classified," said one official
"Because of that fact, we can't
permit pictures even of the para-
chute attached to it."
The Alvin was one of three tiny
subs used in the search. They
were brought here from the Unit-
ed States to take part because
they can dive to great depths.
The sub found the bomb on a
70-foot slope among other hills
and valleys of the sea bottom, of-
ficials said.
Consequences
Consequences of the loss were
tremendous.
First there was worry over se-
curity-some officials said the
Communists, either t h r o u g h
chance or espionage techniques,
might get their hands on it.
Then there was the fear of
Spanish residents of the area that
radioactivity might contaminate l
them.

I--

UAC's CREATIVE ARTS FESTIVAL 19611
WILL GEER, a theater veteran of real
distinction, began his career in boat
shows, tents, and repertory in the 20's
with Sothern and Marlowe, and made
WILL GEER
his New York debut as Pistol with Otis
n a Program
of Frost, Whitman, Skinner and Mrs. Fiske in The Merry
and wainW 7- ofWinTcr NP'm 4zn nn '-

J

14!!

2nd ANNUAL
JUDO
Demonstration
March 19, 1966
7:30-9:30 p.m.
Ann Arbor YMCA
Williams & 5th Ave.
TICKETS AVAILABLE
at The YMCA
Donation:

BOG

RT!

I

Adults:
Children:

$1.00
$ .50

In
CASABLANCA
and
The Caine Mutiny
what else can we say?
PLEASE NOTE: In order to show both films
and eat, too, we will open at 8:00 p.m.,
the first movie beginning at 8:30.

PH. 483-4680
FREE CAR HEATERS
NOW SHOWING
DORIS DAY-ROD TAYLOR
DO NOT'
DISTURiW
CinemaScope-Color by DELUXE
-.7 .1 A- 1. AA

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ETHAN BRAND will speak on "Line
and the Modern May"

Bitrniizg

11

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