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January 11, 1966 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-01-11

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.PAGE TIWO

THE. MICHIGAN fDAILY

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'W' TY't T'1 T ('Y !Y T T I T.r !v

TUESDIAY, JANUJARY 11, 19(66

I

Ht';V'S SPEAKS:
Graduate Studies Evaluated;
Symposium Honors Sawyer

Bureau Releases Guides
For Cost Sharing Plan

i

*

Two ideas to help liberate to- the undergraduate student too, to
day's graduate student from the where the action is, he said.
academic dilemma of his univer- Heyns said the graduate stu-
sity life were presented here yes- dent's problems stem largely from
terday at a symposium honoring his membership in multiple groups.
Ralph A. Sawyer. His separate roles as student, ap-
The vice-president emeritus for, Prentice in a discipline and mem-
research devoted 45 years to the ber of the teaching .staff create
University, where he contributed conflicts.
greatly to the education of grad- The graduate student has to
uat. students as dean of the Hor- master subject matter and dog-
ace H. Rackham School of Grad- ma, but has an unclear role-he

Y
e
b
i
u
e
d
b
a
a

uate Studies.
Educators praised Sawyer who
has retired as having great and
lasting influence on the stand-
ards of University research. oHis
personal characteristics and d
votion to! teaching and adminis-
tration drew'praise, particularly in
relating research to the aspira-
tions and education of graduate:
students.

is an incomplete member of the.
student body. Universities are un-
certain as to his participation in
student life.
Demands on 'Apprentice'
Although he is treated as an
apprentice seeking membership, h'
is expected to be creative and
mak'e original contributions.
A reanalysis is needed in re-
gard to student status and the

Nichols said it is time after 100
years, that new thinking be direct-
ed to graduate education.
"We must either limit our ad-
missions to a much smaller num-
er of students, or own up to
what we are doing and be hon-
est about it," he said.
Two Degrees
Universities are currently giv-
ng two doctorate degrees, one in-
spirational, leading to research
achievement, and the other, a
union card, leading to teacher
employment, he said.
Nichcls proposed two doctorate
degrees, both to be completed
within four years. The first would
be "a pass PhD, the other an
Honors PhD," he said.j
For the pass PhD, he suggested'
coherent program of courses,
at least one year of language if
needed, a year as a teaching fel-
ow and a year to write a disser-
ation. This means one assigned
hat can be completed in a year,
he added.
Honor PhD
"The Honor PhD would include
n atmosphere of freedom so the
raduate student would do a piece
of research that would be thQ be-
inning (of a career) not the end
of his research."
Nichols said the graduate pro-
ram was borrowed from Germviy
nd it has been given very little
hought during the past 100 years.

(Continued from Page 1)
Vice-President for Research A.
Geoffrey Norman labeled the
guidelines "vague" and "not spel-
ling out the actual intent of Con-
gress." The guidelines, according
to Norman, give the individual
federal agencies awarding the
grants great latitude to do what-
ever they may wish.
He further commented that,
there have been no clear policy
statements from the agencies and
reaction may vary greatly from
one agency to the next. "The Uni-
versity will not know how the
agency has interpreted the guide-
lines and what percentage of the
costs it will be required to pay
until actual negotiations begin on
the individual grants," Norman
said.
Language Vague
Robert Burroughs, director of
research administration, com-
mented that the language of the
guidelines says more through in-
ference than through specific
policy statements. The wording,
Burroughs added, gives the im-
pression that the guidelines will
give the University little or no
relief from the previous situation.
"The fact that the guidelines are
as broad as they are," Burroughs
continued, "puts pressure on the
agencies to force universities to
continue to carry a substantial
financial burden for federal re-
search grants."
Burroughs indicated that the'
University had been under the
impression, from the discussions
Order

of the appropriations committee,
that the Bureau of the Budget
would set down guidelines close
to a figure of five per cent of the
total costs. The five per cent fig-
ure would have been a consider-
able improvement over the limita-
tions of the indirect cost reim-
bursement plan.
Burroughs concluded that "if
there is to be a considerable
benefit to the University under
the new guidelines, there must be
a corresponding increase in
agency appropriations, which was
not forthcoming in the past year."
Vivian, however, said that an
increase in appropriations was left
in abeyance, waiting for the
Bureau of the Budget to release
the final guidelines. The lack of
an appropriations increase to
make up for the increased cost to
the government under the new
plan, Vivian indicated, could also
mean a cut in the total number
of research grants.
Norman concluded that "in
making next year's appropriations
Congress should be cognizant of
the effect of this year's change in
grant-cost sharing policy."
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Team of Learners innovated behavior that is a dis- n
Chancellor Roger W. Heyns, of cipline requirement, Heyns said. 1
the University of California at Heyns said it is not possible for t
Berkeley, proposed the concept of a major university to make great t
a team of learners to create more. contributions to education "unless h
educational onportunities for grad- it recognizes that the graduate
u, te students. student is part of the teaching
A suggestion to face the dilem- community." a
ma of the double standard in doc- Competition for Students g
torate programs by granting two "The University that is wise o
doctor of philosophy degrees was enough to compete for graduate g
made by Roy F. Nichols, dean of students because these people are o
the University of Pennsylvania necessary and essential to the
Graduate School and vice-arovost. educational process will steal a g
Heyns, the former University march on other universities," he a
vice-president for academic af- asserted. t
fairs, said American universities ------ - _
"have created additional difficul- HEARING TOMORROW:
ties for 'graduate students by not HE RN TO O R W
making clear that these people are
our colleagues.,'
"They work for us, and should U ,C M U
as a consequence be planners in
making pedagogical decisions," he 'U ' i n.. L aT o
asserted. U in farOb

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PROFESSIONAL THEATRE
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May Join
Dispute

Participation Needed
Administrative structure and ap-
paratus in graduate programming
is not free from criticism in look-
ing at problems facing graduate
students today, he said. Often,
they are 'treated as if they were
in a hiring hall. This. is not the
way to. communicate a sense of
participation, Heyns said, nor the
way to enhance the prestige and
status of these individuals.
iAs. one. proposal, the California
University chancellor proposed
that undergraduates, graduate stu-
dents .and: professors act as a
team of learners.
Team Approach
"Subiect matter would be select-
ed because it is of interest to all
members in an area close to the
frontier,-currently being explored'
by the professor and open to
graduate interest."
Such a.team approach calls 'for
developing the graduate student's
life. "What united it is the proc-
ess of inquiry--respect and skill
that vwe all want our students to
achieve," he said..
Rather than having a continua-
tion of competition between grad-
uate students, there is a need to
structure the team approach so
graduate students can learn from
each other, he suggested.
University Tensions
Heyns said the problems or ten-
sions that bother today's graduate
student are also symptomatic of
tensions within the university it-
self. Integration of .scholarship
and research is needed to bring

(Continued from Page 1)
While the state universities have
been taking action against Public
Act 319. txvo unions in Washtenaw
county have petitioned the court
to allow -their attorneys to inter-
vene in the hearing to help the
attorney general defend the act.
Local 1583 of the American Fed-
eration' of State, County and
Municipal Employes and the
Building Trades Council have pre-
sented the petitions which claim
that the rights of their members
won't be adequately represented
unless the unions' attorneys are
involved in the hearing, William
Lemmer, University attorney, said
yesterday.
Also, Barry.Bluestone, '66, said
the University of Michigan Stu-
dent Economic Union Executive
Board decided Sunday to work
with local unions to get recogni-
tion from the University for the
unions and to talk with a labor
lawyer in Detroit on the procedure
for filing with the Mediation
Board.
UMSEU will file a petition in
late January or early February
asking that it be recognized the
sole bargaining agent for student
employes in the dorms.
UniversityAttorney L e m m er
commented that UMSEU's action
is novel and could be either up-
held or thrown out by the Media-
Patronize the
Daily Advertisers

F ff

tion Board if the court should de-
cide in favor of the. Public Act.
Lemmer said that it would be up
to the board to define if students
constitute a separate unit.'
Over. vacation the University
filed its suit in Washtenaw Coun-
ty Court asking that the Hutch-
inson Act askamended be declared
unconstitutional as its applies to
the University and that the court
issue an injunction preventing the
Mediation Board from considering
petitions filed by the unions until
the case is decided.
A hearing date of Dec. 29 was
set up by the court, but at the
request of Attorney General Frank
Kelly the hearing was postponed
until Jan. 12 at 4 p.m. in the
Washtenaw County Bldg.
The court this Wednesday will
start the hearings on the injunc-
tion plea, but no date has been
set on hearing the constitutional
question, Lemmer said.
-r{
DIAL 5-6290
ENDING TONIGHT
" t : : : : ;. :: : i :
When this
aeligible
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tails
her cat
through {
}his yard
leads
to this
:: : cool
kitten }
and ther
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