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March 11, 1966 - Image 7

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-03-11

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PAGE VENV

FRIDAY, MARCH 11, 1966

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDY, MRCH11, 966THE,.CHGAN .AI_

n V L %J Cu i', 1-4

SCrimson Fills Void
Left by News Strike

STUDENTS SUSPENDED:

Hunter College Paper Ends Publication;
Dean Questions Editor's Qualifications

Dine Out

CAMBRIDGE, Mass. (P) - Stu-
dents who run the Harvard Crim-
son are publishing a special edi-
tion to fill the gap 'caused by a
strike that has closed Boston's
newspapers.
It's The Boston Crimson, a
daily whose first four-page edi-
tion appeared Wednesday, com-
plete with a racing handicapper.
On the first day, 30,000 copies
were distributed in downtown Bos-
ton and a few suburbs.
"We felt if we could perform a'
service, we ought to do it," said
co-editor Donald Graham. The
students plan to publish the pa-
per until the strike ends.
A special staff was rounded up
and took over a room in the of-
fices of the Harvard Crimson,
which is continuing to publish the
college paper.
The advertising office consists
of Brooke Stevens, 25, a Cam-
bridge resident who volunteered to
help, sitting on a box near a pile
of debris. A lone daisy thrives in
a soda pop bottle on her desk.
Rewrite men, editors and busi-
ness manager share another desk

and telephones nearby.
Cathleen Cohen, 21, a Radcliffe
senior from New York City, typed
up atelevision schedule. "Do you
have to proofread these?" she ask-
ed. "This is awful."
R. Andrew Beyer, a senior Eng-
lish major from Erie, Pa., is sports
editor and self-proclaimed "world's
greatest handicapper of thorough-
breds."
"I've always had a secret desire
to be a racing handicapper," Andy
said, "and on the Crimson, writ-
ing races, well, there's just no
audience for it."
Andy managed two winners out
of nine picks at Lincoln Downs
Wednesday.
The idea for the publishing ven-
ture came from Robert J. Sam-
uelson, 20, president of the Crim-
son and a government major from
New York.
Martin Levine, 21, a history ma-
jor from Hillsdale, N.J., teams
with Graham to direct the oper-
ation. Graham is the son of Kath-
erine Graham, president of the
Washington Post Publishing Co.

for Enjoyment

Collegiate Press Service

Ask Communist Teachers
To Speak at North Carolina

NEW YORK-The Hunter Col-
lege Meridian was suspended from
publication and its editor and
copy editor suspended from classes
last week in a climax to a series
of clashes between the student
newspaper and the Dean of Stu-
dents.
On March 2, Meridian editor
Roberta Kantor was denied an
exemption to run for a second
term as editor by a student-
administration board which judges
grade qualifications for major stu-
dent positions. The editorship of
the campus newspaper requires a
gradepoint average of 2.5; Miss
Kantor had a 2.44. The two stu-
dents on the board split on wheth-
er to allow the exemption in her
case, and Dean of Students Glen
Nygreen cast the deciding vote
against her.
Publication of the newspaper
was suspended the next day when
it came out with signed editorials
by the editor and editorial board
promising to continue publication
under the present leadership. The
editor and copy editor were sus-
pended from classes for one week
pending a hearing when the Dean
charged them with breaking into
the Meridian office, on which he
had installed a new lock.
The case is scheduled to be
heard this week by a faculty
committee appointed by Nygreen
to determine whether his suspen-
sion ruling should be extended to
include the rest of the semester.
The New York chapter of the
American' Civil Liberties Union
is providing the students with an
attorney.
The Meridan has charged that
Nygreen is conducting a "personal
vendetta" against Miss Kantor and
the newspaper. In the editorial
defying the exemptions ruling, the
editorial board pointed out that
when Miss Kantor's grade average
was only 2.25 last semester, "be-
fore any Meridians had been pub-
lished under (her) editorship," she

was granted an exemption.
The conflict between the paper
and the Dean of Students erupted
toward the end of last semester.
Nygreen brought the paper before
the student-faculty-administration
Judicial Board on charges of hav-
ing liquor in the office during a
Christmas party.
In his presentation of the case
for "disciplinary action" Nygreen
outlined four possible penalties
which he thought the Judicial

Collegiate Press Service
CHAEL HILL, N.C.-Two schol-
ars from Communist countries
have been invited to speak at the
University of North Carolina at
Chapel Hill at the same time an
invitation' to American Marxist
theorist Herbert Apthpker was
again denied.
Acting Chancellor J. Carlyle
Sitterson said if they accept, the
Communist scholars would appear
in "classroom situations." He said
their visit would be clearly in line
with "the educational purposes of
the university" and therefore won
his approval.
Aptheker's invitation had orig-
finally been rejected by' the UNC2
executive committee after com-
mittee chairman Gov. Pat K.
Moore said he didn't think the
speech would serve the "educa-
tional purpose" of the school.

sity, a private school.
The two Communist scholars
who were invited 'this, week to
speak at UNC are Prof. Vladimir
Alexandrov of Moscow University,
studying at Indiana University,
who was invited by the Political
Science Department and the poli-
tical science honorary, Chi Sigma
Alpha, and Dr. Hanus Pabousek, a
Chechoslavakian scientist teaching
at the University of Denver. He
was invited by the psychology de-
partment and the UNC Develop-
mental Psychological Training
Program.
Meanwhile. a law firm at
Greensboro, N.C.,. is now working
in connection with the UNC stu-
dent government to take the re-
jection of another speaker, Frank
Wilkinson, chairman of a. com-
mittee working to abolish the
House Un-American Activities
Committee, to court. It is expected

Board might impose: that it was his "intention" to "ask
-denying Meridian the use of Student Council and the Publica-
office space on campus; tion Board to review the present
-removing the editors from constitution of Meridian and to
office; make recommendation for any
-dissolving the entire editorial changes in the method of election
structure and recommending that of editors, the method of approval
the Student Council form a news- of such election, and the length of
paper; the term of office of such per-
-suspending individual students sons." The editor is currently
from school. elected by the staff of the news-
Nygreen also indicated in his paper for one semester and is
presentation to the Judicial Board eligible to run for a second term.
FOR
YOUNG
ELEGANCE
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Aptheker will speak in Chapel the Aptheker invitation will be
Hill, however, this week. He will included in the case as both in-
address an SDS-sponsored meet- vitations were rejected in the
ing off campus. He spoke earlier in same action by the executive com-
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The University of Michigan
Gilbert and Sullivan Society
Presents
EUDDI9OF
March 23, 24, 25, 26-8:00
& Sat. Matinee-2:00
TICKETS ON SALE 8 A.M.-5 P.M.
March 14 & 15 . . . Fishbowl
March 16, 17, & 18 .. . SAB Box Office
March 21-26.. . Lydia Mendelssohn
Wed. & Thurs. $1.50; Fri. & Sat. $2.00; Sat. Mat. $1.00

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LAST DAY
LONDON GRAFICA ARTS
presents an exhibition

original, lithographs,
etchings, wood cuts

Here's the penny loafer with loaf to spare: the inside is leather lined and in-
soled with a cushion of foam. The outside with handsewn front* is yours in a
.. _ , 1 1r 1 _ _t 1- - --r . - - __3 . 3

i

II

11

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