100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 09, 1966 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-03-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

tJ[JY, TfAfiL"C 't1 A f.Y lk& A IMt4vT A stn w.

1~AOI~ TWO THE MICHh(~AN flAill'

A LIJNLEL 1YX,.iMARCH I9, 1966

i

fCaressed': Tedious Newsreel
About Disagreeable Characters

FILMS
Cold Realism, Cruelty
Characterize 'The Spy'

i

Across Campus

i.

By PETER BICKELMANN
Jst .now the Campus Theater
is marking time between showings
of -"The Loved One" and "Darling"
-rand surely some transition is
needed between two films, despite
their titles, so dissimilar. Still, we
might have been offered something
better than "Caressed;" a Film
Festival Award Winning Drama
s .in Vancouver by Laurence
Kent, who also. bears full respon-
sib ]ity for the filmscript. Fifty
years ago, this sort of treatment
of adolescent sex would have
shocked and repelled; t o d a y
(whether or not this may be an
absolute gain for us) we have be-
come inured: films like "Caressed"
first amuse, then very soonx bore
us.
Though ,we have learned to' ex-
pect 'most anything from the
Canadian National Film Board;
this film is not in any way experi-
mental; 'andy et, without any
hand-held camera gimmicks, the
director.still.manages, to achieve
the tedious effect of making an,
hour-and-a-h alf newsreel about
people . who are not a bit news-
worthy. One.. soon gets tired of

seeing a few high school hoods
loitering on street corners in
downtown Vancouver, leering at a
procession of tarts and office girls.
It may be taking "Caressed" too
seriously to claim that it even
raises a basic question about
movies today in general, but the
film, is like many others today in
attempting to deal with insipid, or
even disagreeable characters, the
sort you try .to avoid -at parties.
That it is possible to mike a 'good
movie about such a type is shown
by; for instance, "Cleo 'From 5 to
7;" but many directors, including
Mr. Kent, have not yet learned
that, when the central character;
is uninteresting, the other ele-
ments of the picture - photog-
raphy, script, acting, etc.-must be
extra-ordinarily effective to sus-
tain our interest.
Instead, "Caressed" suffers from
photography so stolid it might
have come from television; a script
that trades on all the conventions
of teenage sex--furtive attempts
to pass beyond the leering stage-
and a script which is even triter
than its subject; and acting that's
so painfully natural that it's like;
Candid Camera gone arty, or per-

haps -;an outgrowth of detergent
testimonials. A theme like that. of
"Caressed" could be brought off if
it were handled either humorously,
at the expense of the characters,
or seriously, with all the earnest-
ness with which these kids aggra-
vate their own problems. "Cares-
sed" fails-. to sustain either mood,
nor does it cover its weaknesses
with. the-.polish- of inventive pho-
tography, imaginative direction
and so .on, which, at their best,
are much more than mere orana-
ments- to a good film.
Makeweights on this program
are "Un chien Andalou," listed on
the Campus' time schedule as
'.Andalusia," 'as if a pr'ogram=with-.
out a travelogue would be literally
unthinkable; and what we might
.facetigps'ly call a short subject,
"Icarus," written by Ray Brad-
bury. The 'former, made by Dali
and Bunnel, is so delightfully zany
that any further comment would
be pedantic;, of the latter, the less
said, the better-this time because
it is so meretricious., All in all, this
program won't do, especially when
films like "King and .Country"
and "Shakespeare-Wala" are long
overdue in, Ann Arbor.

By ROBERT MOORE
T h e predominantly favorable
big-city reviews have already said
it well enough: "The Spy Who
Came in from the Cold" is an
arresting,-engrossing look into a
world you never knew existed.
There is little James Bond glamor
or UN.C.L.E. action in "The Spy,"
only a jaded story of an ostensibly
glamorous game played without
rules, for high stakes, with preci-
sion, violence a n d expedient
cruelty.,
John Le Carr6's book was a
best-seller because of this realism;
the film will probably be a finan-
cial success because ,Producer-Di-
rector Martin Ritt used his
cameras and his cast to catch the
same mood as the book.
On black-and-white film, Ritt
captures the book's gloomy, sun-
less mood, with misty European
days, rainy nights, bland interiors
and dramatic shadows. A wave
breaking on a Holland beach un-
derscores one important scene; 'a
dark, airless library emphasizes
the emptiness of ,another.,
It is the characterization, and
particulary the acting of Richard
Burton, that makes the film, suc-
cessful. Burton plays Alec Leamas,
the English spy-"intelligence op-
erator"-who is ordered to accept
dismissal from the service and be-
come a bum so he can defect to
East Berlin. It is part of a plan
to weave one strand of a rope be-
ing prepared by London Intelli-
gence to hang Mundt, an East

German spy. But Leamas has been
told only half the story, and finds
out the rest only when the noose
is taut around his own neck be-
cause of the murderous treachery
of his own service.
Leamas is perfect for the plot:
he is bitter after his own failures
in West Berlin and lacerated in-
ternally by the inhuman amoral-
ity of his profession. Burton plays
Leamas masterfully, with an in-
articulate, tormented loneliness.
He takes a lover, but his loving
of her is reluctant and painful, for
all the "women's emotions"-love,
compassion-are merely weakness-
es he has been trained to ignore
and exploit. Yet in the sad, empty
ending, Leamas gives the only
thing a spy can give of himself for
love: his life.
Naturally the film has weak-
nesses. The plot is as complex as
European politics; the scriptwrit-
ers were able to pare the book
down to four main characters, but
still there are questions left in the
viewers' minds. Clare Bloom, as
Leamas' lover, is perhaps too
pretty, and Oskar Werner, as
Mundt, too chilling.
As a whole, the movie is good,
probably great. Of the succession
of seven spy movies to infiltrate
Ann Arbor this year, "The Spy",
is one that shouldn't be missed, at
the least for its essential contrast
with the others, at the best be-
cause it is a well-written and well-
acted film with a unique mood
and thesis.

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 9
4:15 p.m.-The Department of
Psychology will present Dr. Jacques
Lacan of the Sorbonne in Paris
during a colloquium on "Psycho-
analysis and Language," held in
Aud. C.
THURSDAY, MARCH 10
2:15 p.m. - John A. Stark-
weather will hold a seminar on
"Computer-Assisted Interviewing
and Testing" at 1057 MHRI.
7 and 9 p.m.-The Ann Arbor
Film Festival will be held in the
Architecture Aud.
8:00 p.m.-The Travel Club will
sponsor the film "Return to Erin"
in Aud. A.
8:30 p.m.-The School of Music
will present a String Orchestra
Concert with John Farrer con-
ducting in the Recital Hall, School
of Music.
8:30 p.m.-The student string
orchestra, conducted by John Far-
rer, a student in the School of
Music, will present a concert in
the music school Recital Hall. Fea-
tured will be a premiere work,
"Three Pieces for Strings," by Jer-
ry Dilik, a member of the Michi-
gan Band.
FRIDAY, MARCH 11
4:15 p.m.-The Psychology De-
Ladies' Day Wed. 50c till 6 P.M.
ITb A DOG-GOiNE
DAFFY DISA .R!

partment will present Dr. Leonard in Aud. A.
Berkowitz of the Univertisy of SUNDAY, MARCH 13
Wisconsin in a colloquium on 7 and 9 p.m.-The Ann Arbor
"Some Experiments on Automa- Film Festival will be held in the 0
tism and Intent in Human Ag- Architecture Aud.
gression" in Aud. B.- ---
7 and 9 p.m.-The Ann Arbor
Film Festival will be held in the
Architecture Aud.
10:00 p.m.-The State Cham-
pionship Debates will be held at
Rackham Lecture Hall.
SATURDAY. MARCH 12
7 and 9 p.m.-The Ann Arbor
Film Festival will be held in the
Architecture Aud.
7 and 9 p.m.-Cinema II will
present the film "David and Lisa"
I U

LDAILY OFF ICIAL B ULLETIN
" R Mfi. :32 : v:,.g ma .: >'A v rY"* " A .,xfY:' q".} .r,,,.:tAk:"::,ra}'}t M ":' ".n Y:y{ x, "a0 Y" ". . vA^FY 1 " r .4U~i"f> t4 " ,M .i "i"+e+YM r.: v re""" . v v4~Y "..v. "

The .Daily Official. Bulletin is an
Official publication of the Univer-
siiy of Michigan for which The
Michigan. Daily assumes no editor-
ial responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3519 Administration Bldg. be-
fore '2 p.m. of the day preceding
publication, and by 2 p.m. Friday
for Saturday and Sunday. General'
Notices may. be published a maxi-
mum: of two tines on request; pay
Caienidat items appear once only
Student organization notices are not
accepted for publicati on.
WEDNESDAY, MARCH, 9
.Day. Cale mn~ar
Management Development Seminar-
"Basics of Supervision": Rackham
Bldg., 8:30 a.m;1
:Office of Religious Affairs Book Dis-
ussion-=George Abbot- White, "Saint
Francis" by Nikes Kazantzakis: 2417
Mason Hall, 12 m.
Management Development Seminar-
"Effective Cost Control": Michigan Un-
ion, 1:30 p.m.
Dept., of . Architecture Lecture--Ta-
dousz Barucki, architect SARP of War-
saw' Poland, "Vernacular Architecture":
Archltectur'e Aud.,,3:30 p.m.
Symposium on Japanese Kabuki: Lee-
ture-James Brandon, Michigan Site.
Vriiversi-t "'the' Aetingand Produition
Techniques .of Kabuki" Aud. A, Angell
Hall, 4:15 p.m.
School 'of Music 1faculty Recital: -
Stanley Quartet: Rackhain Lecture Hall,
8;30 p m.
Dept. of Classical Studies Lecture:
Prof. Clark :Hopkins,- "The U. of' M.
Exccvattons at'-Appolinia, 1965," Thurs.,
March X0, 4 10 p.m., Aud. B, Angell
H411.
Doctoral Examination for Raymond
Eugene Bahor, Industrial Health; thesis:
"The Role of LiverLipid in the Poten-
tiation of Carbon Tetrachioride Tox-
lelty," Wed., May 9, 162o _PH, at 10

*

a.m. Chairnian, H. H. Cornish.
General Notices
.Fulbright-Hays Lectureships are still.
available for 1966-67. The list may be
consulted in the. Graduate 'Fellowship
Office, Room 110 Rackham Bldg. The
list includes new positions in Afghan-
istan (medical science), Ceylon (social
work, English language teaching), Fin-
land (geography),-Hong Kong (Amer-
can literature, English language teach-
ing), and India (American literature
and history, economics, sociology, poll-
tipa1 science). Faculty members wishing
announcements of Fulbright -'Hays
awards for lecturing and research
abroad during 1967-68 are advised to
request them now from the Conference
Board of Associated Research Councils,
2101 Constitution. Ave:, NW., Washing-
ton, D.C., 20418.

Graduate Record Examinations: Ap-
plication blanks' are available in Rm.
122 Rackham Bldg. for the Graduate
Record Examination. The next admin-
istration of- the test will be on Sat.,
April 23, :and applications must be re-
ceived in Princeton, N.J., by April 8.
Lecture: Wed., March 9, 4:15 p.m.,
Aud. C. The Dept. of Psychology, joint
with Linguistics and Anthropology, will
present Dr. Jaques Lacan of the Sor-
bonne, Paris, speaking on "Psycho-
analysis and Language."
Engineering Freshmen: Important op-
portunity. .to discuss your questions
about Engineering, Thurs., March 10, 4
p.m., Run. 311'W. Engrg.
Timmer Foundation Scholarship:
University of Michigan students' who
are juniors, seniors,. or graduates are
(Continued on Page 8)

I

I

"It's great to see a spy movie
as realistic and believable!"
-New York Times

:.y. Mrw{: "n "{:1'?":;r.'"?}y.M{{7:;Y?'n."Z,4"y1.;{;". .;r,.;{. n" ?r{"'r:. . ti? ';:;jM":Y. '"-r {".::} ":r'"' .afi:C;:r ?{.' $?:Sr,:?{4"v,:?{"'ri ":":??;:"?{":i;:;{ rr,'.:?7".
........ ?}{.... .M.; .Mn. r r":";"??:",{ i:?°r ";:i{? : .wr{. :vti Y:,..w'"?n1 d.M:M''F a .?h".fi ". {': rnM:":" ""."s:{ti{w.rnn4r7'f
GANIZATIO NOTICES
ti .
nw"":vM: rw:r::."."."sM:."n::".":". ". vrr.Ma.M: :M."..".".no^.".".e".wco..o?;:?.a r:.?:vx :r{{{<v:"?:::.M.atiM?... .".M:bi:M""" ...;.;''"';:
v:{":;:{::}{::{:':;:j{:"$:":;: "; ",{"::,rv,":.7.v:.":."::hvr.":nM3.$::'? :"?}Y..;""."'r?;nMr:":?{"""r?""".L':":"?::M'r..":."r..,.} ".."".". 'r .r: t" ,.v .,.
- J :r ...".".";.? "e"?sr."." ,."?r.M?.vs{+"+xxvnM."."nwv.^r.M.fr',.vad..rn....nm.{...?n..w........rr.n..r2."., :r w.Rr'r'.i"?'r?:"::..C:,.? n n. :": " : Y4

Academy Award Nomination-Best Actor
PARAMOUNT PICTURESsPtrWahs
RICHARID BURTON
CLAIRE BIOM
SKAR WERNERm,
'wKCAMEIN
FROM THE COWD1s:
f A MARTIN RITT PRODUCTINI
Order Your , ai1y o -
Phone 764-0558

USE OF THIS COLUMN FOR AN-
NOUNCEMENTS is available to official-
ly recognized and registered student
organizations only. Forms are available
in Room 1011 SAB.
Joint. Judiciary' Council will hold its
We'ekly meeting'on 'March 9, at- 7 p.m.,
3rd fl. conf. room, SAB.
* * *
French Club, Le Baratin, Jeudi, 3-
p.m., 3050 Frieze Bldg. venez tous.
. * * *
Cinema II, "David & Lisa, March 12
& 13, 7 & 9 p.m., Aud. A.
* * *
U. of M. Chess Club, 4th round of
tournament, election of officers, March
10, 7:30 p.m., Room 3B, Union.
* * *
Graduate Student Council, General
business meeting, March 9, 7:30 p.m.,
East Conference Room, Rackham Bldg.
* * *
University Lutheran Chapel, 1511
Washtenaw, VVed, evening Lenten serv-

4

ice, 10 p.m., Rev. Arthur S. Spomer,
speaker: "An Enemy, Yet a Friend." All
welcome.
La ..Sociedad iHispanica, El Prof. nie
hablara sobre "El surrealismo en la lit--
erature espanola,"' miercoles, 8 p.m.
3050 Frieze Bldg.
Newman Student Association, Grad-
uate community mass - all welcome
March 9, 5' p.r, 331' Thompson. Also
Wed., Ecwmenical.-Dialogue Group -
discussion: ."Power in the Church," 8:30
p.m., Guild House, 802 Monroe.
* * *
Bahai' Student Group, Fireside:
"Twenty Thousand Martyrs," March 11.
8 p.m., 3545 SAB. All welcome.
S ' '* * *
Campus Chapel, Lenten service, Wed.,
March 9, 10 p.m. Forest at Washtenaw.
* * *
Lutherau Student Chapel, Lenten Ves-
pers, March 9, 7:15 p.m., Hill St. at
Forest Ave.

wALrbiSNEYS
oO! TECHNICOLO
S WaltVsney"
Shown at 1 :00
3:00-5:00-7:00 & 9:05

OSEPH E. LEVINE PRESENTS
lAURENCEIARVEY* 111K BOGARDE
JAtE CHRISTIE
a powerful and bold motion picture...
madeby adults...witbadults...foradults!
P O0UCED BY JOSEPH JANNI DIRECTED BY JOHN SCHLESINGER
'SCREENPLAY BY-FREDERIC RAPHAEL
associate prod"Cer Victor Lyndon . mystc by John Dankyorth
A JOSEPH JANNPRODUCTIoN . AN MBAS Y PICTURES RECEAS(

1 '

Coring
Thursday,

F,; CAMPUS

Ed Tonight
"Caressed"

L

":.}:".
:: r:::. ::.":.:v ---- -
"""""""""" ....:.M ":::.":::.'v4 :::.v:::.' ... "
r.::: ...... ....:..
..I. J::::": 1. :.:.:...: 14 . J.. .
4 ...... . .. ....:...... y.: .:.:..
':4":: " :444ti'":L . 1: ..t ...... ..4':.'::...:::': "::.:: ::::.: :.'.." ':.'. " .
n....4.}.a.4r....}i.: ::."Y,".x..:fi:::4:"'rvti":"i:{ti"...y..4..vwv."::::ii{v:"."..":..::.:....a.........4 iv:.414+.4ve{s" ..............4.-.................^.Vi:"}:n:o::::::.:..:..:::::,:vi?}?:dv4:.";"X..............: A;:::: : ?'{:.::d":::J:':'r:': :
}.4

$0

Crea tide ',fbt4

3e4 tidal

F.!

- .

TODAY.
George Abbott White
concludes discussions of the works
of NIKOS KAZANTZAKIS.

12:00 Noon
Room 2417,
Mason Hall

presents.

#i

r'

wi th

SAINT FRANCIS

NEXT WEDNESDAY:.
James Torrens discusses
The Mind of Kirkegoard
by James Collins.

DISCUSSION FREE-
you provide the lunch!
Dates still open for you
to lead discussions:
March 30
April 6
(call 764-7442 to make
arrangements)

4

THE NEW CHRISTY MINSTRELS

k

Wednesday Noon Book Discussions sponsored by The Office of
Religious Affairs, The University of Michigan

R

j

iI"

K

I

GOOD
SEATS
STILL

*,

FU-MANCIU
will not be in town this weekend, but

.1111;

PATRICIA REYNOLDS

AVAILABLE

'11

will be, with
folk, blue grass, country western

BLOCK TICKET ORDERS

(Melvin .will speak on his American tour)

i

also:'
Cine a n t ,MVi ]"Ik

FRIDAY, MARCH 11

May be picked up
at Hill Box Office

r

11

1111

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan