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March 01, 1966 - Image 7

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-03-01

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY rAGE SEVEN

TUESDAY, MARCH 1, 1966

TIJESDAY, MARCH 1,1966 TIlE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE SEVEN

Wolverines

Eliminate

Iowa in

103-88

Win

By HOWARD KOHN
Cazzie Russell reached another
high point in his collegiate career
and Michigan clipped the high-
flying Hawkeyes from Iowa last
night 103-88.
Russells first basket of the
game, a soft jumper from the side
and the shot that has been the
Wolverines' bread-and-butter dish
for the past three years, gave the
All-American guard 2,000 career
points.
What does the new record mean
to Caz? "It felt great," he said
after the game with his famed
boyish enthusiasm. "But I hope
the highlight of my career is still
to come." And with several more
records crowding into view, Rus-
sell may need a warehouse to store
souvenir basketballs.
Ralph Miller's "hound-dog
Hawks watched Russell and Co.
barnst orm through their pressing
Big Ten Standings I

defense and crush lingering hopes
for an evasive Big Ten title. The
formula for a third consecutive
Michigan championship is now
"one 'M' win plus one MSU loss
equals title"-a trick that can be
turned next Monday night when
the Wolverines travel to East
Lansing fpr their season finale.
Had To Beat Iowa
"We knew we had to eliminate
Iowa tonight," explained a jubu-
lant Dave Strack. "Now it narrows
down to a showdown between us
and State."
"They (Iowa) came here with
the idea that they were the best
in the conference, and we didn't
want them to leave town feeling
that way," said Strack with a
slight trace of vengeful pride. The
Hawkeyes stopped Michigan at the
Iowa Fieldhouse last Monday per-
petuating a home win streak, but
last night the tables turned on
Miller.
The fast-moving Wolverines
pushed aside the weary Hawkeye
defense with sharp, accurate pass-
ing to move the ball downcourt,
and then overpowered them with
an impressive 63.6 shooting per-
centage from the floor. Miller was
forced to let the Hawks drop the
press with only a few minutes
gone, and he then used it only as
a desperation maneuver .in the
fading minutes.
Kept Iowa from Driving
Michigan's defense, meanwhile,
kept the driving Iowa cagers out
of the lanes and away from the
basket. The Wolverines experi-
mented with a zone defense but
settled on an effective man-to-
man strategy. Iowa managed only
11 lay-ups last night, compared to
19 last Monday.
"We realized they wanted to
drive again, but Ollie (Darden)
and Jim (Myers) stopped them

MICHIGAN
Michigan State
Iowa
Illinois
Minnesota
Northwestern
Ohio State
Wisconsin
Indiana
Purdue

W
10
9
7
7
7
6
4.
4
3
3

L
2
3
5
5
5
6
8
8
9
9

Pct.
.833
.750
.583
.583
.583
.500
.333
.333
.250
.250

an opening 14-7 lead, but a pepI
talk by Strack and team effort
pushed the Wolverines in front.,
Michigan called timeout and two1
minutes later John Clawson saved l
the ball from going out of boundsi
and Russell layed it up to make it
15-14.
The lead see-sawed for the next1
10 minutes and the Wolverines<
ended up only four points ahead1
at halftime.E
Michigan outhustled and out-1
rebounded the Hawkeyes by an
obvious margin in the second 20c
minutes. Darden and Russell dom-
inated the boards for a 24-111
second half edge, and Miller's
quintet, which trains with thet
cross-country team, lagged like]
Saturday morning students on of-
fense.
A three-point play by Gary
Olsen pulled them even at 53-53;
but Darden shot the Wolverines,
ahead on the next play with his
own three pointer.
Hawkeyes' Dying Gasp
Iowa's last threat came with 10
minutes remaining and George
Peeples and Denny Pauling sport-,
ing four fouls each. The Hawkeyes°
held a 75-72 lead when Peeples
picked up his fifth and Michigan
switched into a zone defense.
"With Peeples gone, they had
trouble moving underneath," ex-
plained the Wolverine coach.
But it was Cazzie Russell who
ignited the Michigan offense to a
roaring come-back with a crowd-
pleasing play. The Caz stole the
ball under the Iowa basket, flip-
ped in a hook and was fouled by
Pauling, who left with five per-
sonals.
The three-point play put Mich-
igan at the helm and within two
minutes Iowa was floundering 10
points back. And the sophomore
subs of Ralph Miller were no
match for the Michigan seniors.
Raindrops
Despite a leaky roof which kept
Michigan's waterboys busy wiping
off the floor, venerable Yost Field
House provided a warm setting
for the reversal of last week's
misadventure at Iowa City. The
Michigan rooters t o o k deep
breaths and recouped some of the
cheering that has echped through
Yost for three seasons into a cre-
scendo of encouraging, if not
rabid, exclamations.
And the Iowa players felt the
difference. They weren't quick to
admit it, of course, but a disap-
pointed Chris Pervall growled in
reply to a question on the differ-
ence, "Michigan won, what the
hell else do you want me to say?"
Miller, who harboured some per-
sonal opinions about the game, re-

fused a press conference after they
game. An angry rebuff was his
only remark as he left for his
Midwestern haven where the
games seem to end on a different
note.
Iowa has won ten out of ten
games at home, including six in
the Big Ten, but has scraped out
only one victory on the road in
the conference. Last night's loss
eliminated their last chance at
the crown.
"They seemed to have trouble
concentrating on the game," re-
flected one Iowa fan who made
the journey to Ann Arbor. "Last
week they seemed to do everything
perfectly." Whatever it was, the
Hawkeyes never revealed that
checking defense designed to run
the opponent into the floor.
On offense, the Hawks were re-
spectable, hitting over 50 per cent
on their field goal attempts and
nearly 70 per cent from the charity
stripe.
Notwithstanding Russell's per-
formance, Strack was quick to
point out that "Everyone on the
team was a hero tonight. All five
starters came through with the
crucial plays when we needed
them."
It was Myers' turn to lead the
SCORES-
COLLEGE BASKETBALL
Oklahon state 68. Missouri 51
Miami (Fla) 112, Florida State 90
Tennessee 58, Georgia Tech 47
Western Michigan 82, Notre Dame 76
W. Kentucky 81, Middle Tennessee 47
Vanderbilt 97, Tulane 72
Alabama 99, Mississippi 66
Creighton 86, Utah State 79
Louisiana State 86, Florida 73
Penn State 80, Syracuse 79
E. Kentucky 75, E. Tennessee 69
Billboard'
.... . *... *..... .... ... *. .. %f. . ..f.**V::::..
Tickets for this Thursday's
first-round hockey playoff game
between Michigan and Michigan
State may be purchased begin-
ning tomorrow at the ticket of-
fice, State and Hoover. The price
is the same as for regular sea-
son games, and the ticket office
hours remain the same, 8:30
a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
Join The Daily
Sports Staff

supporting cast last night as he
turned in a 23-point effort, 17 in
the second half, plus six rebounds.
Darden tossed in 20' points for
one of his better games and Claw-
son added his average of 17 per
contest.
Cazzie fell eight total pointsI
(less than 1 ppg) behind Dave
Schellhase in the race for the
conference scoring championship,
despite his 31 points.
Russell, however, moved within
range of his own team record for
season scoring and the Big Ten
career field goal record. He al-
ready has scored more points in
his collegiate career than any
Wolverine in history.
And last night's final basket
was a stuff by the guy who's still
looking for more "highlights."

McGilmer
Olsen
Peeples
Ilauling
Ilemall
W hite
Breedlove
Agnew
Totals
MICHIGAN
IOWA

SPORTS NIGHT EDITOR:
DALE SIELAFF

Last Night's Games
Michigan 103, Iowa 88
Michigan State 98, Ohio St. 79
Minnesota 96, Indiana 90.
Illinois 98, Purdue 81
Wisconsin 90, Northwestern 62
Saturday's Games
Northwestern at Michigan
Purdue at Wisconsin
Iowa at Illinois
Michigan State at Indiana
Minnesota at Ohio State

Darden
Clawson
Myers
Russell
Thomnpsoni
Sankey
Dill
Totals

MICHIGAN
G F
9-13 2-3
6-8 5-5
9-15 5-6
14-23 3-5
0-0 4-4
3-4 0-1
1-3 0-1
42-66 19-25

I P T
9 5 20
8 4 17
6 3 23
9 4 31
3 0 2
42 20 103

10WA
G F r P'T
1-20 5-5 7 2 27
9-15 4-6 6 3 2'Z
4-7 2-4 10 5 to
2-4 1-2 2' 5 5
6-13 6-9 1 4 18
1-3 0-0 0 2 2
1-4 0-0 1 0 2
1-2 -0 0 0 2
35-68 18-26 29 21 88
46 57-103
42 46- 88

CAZZIE RUSSELL WAS THE BIG MAN again for the Wolverines
last night in their 103-88 win over Iowa. Caz hit for 31 points,
strengthening his position in the two man Big Ten scoring race
with Purdue's Dave Schellhase.

this time," said StracK.
Darden was particularly out-
standing in his second half per-
formance guarding Ben McGilmer
-the Detroit Northwestern pro-
duct who traded cars for corn.
McGilmer's 21 points in the first

20 minutes kept Iowa within strik-
ing distance at intermission 46-42.
Darden, however, put on a strong
show to limit his former high
school opponent to six points in
the second half.
McGilmer had sparked Iowa to

BIG TEN ROUNDUP:
Spartans Stay Close wi'th 98-79 Romp

By The Associated Press
COLUMBUS - Michigan State
kept its hopes glowing for a Big
Ten basketball crown by rac-
ing to an easy 98-79 victory over
* inept Ohio State.
The Spartans, boosting their
league record to 9-3, stayed one
game Pack of Michigan.
StanhWashington and Bill Cur
tis, with 26 and 20 points respec-
tively, paced the aggressive Spar-
tan offense.
Michigan State led throughout,
building a huge 17-point lead by
halftime and pushing the advant-
age to as many as 32 points in the
middle of the second half.,
Al Peters topped the losers with
18 points while teammate Bob
Dove hit 15 and Bill Hosket 13.
Matthew Aitch, MSU's muscular
6-foot-7 junior, drilled in 14
points and helped the winners
control the backboards.
Ohio State fell to a 4-8 confer-
ence record and .10-12 over-all
while_ Michigan State was winning

Gophers Win, 96-90
BLOOMINGTON - Minnesota
hit 62.5 per cent of its shot from
the field and defeated Indiana
96-90 in a Big Ten basketball
game last night.
Archie Clark, Lou Hudson and
Tom Kondla led the hot-shooting
Gophers. Clark scored 31 points,
Hudson hit for 24, and Kondla
pitched in 22.
Sophomore Vern Payne topped
Indiana with 28 points, and Butch
Joyner added 23.
Minnesota trailed 43-41 with
18:05 to play but outscored In-
diana 30-10 in the next nine min-
utes to lead 71-53. The Hoosiers
pulled back within three points at
85-82 on a three-point play, by
Payne with 2:27 left, but the
Gophers controlled the game the
rest of the way.
Minnesota led most of the first
half and was in front 41-36 at
halftime, but Indiana tied the
score on five points by Max Walk-

43-41 on a shot by Payne.
* * *
Badgers Leave Cellar
MADISON - Wisconsin routed
Northwestern 90-62 to escape the
Big Ten basketball cellar.
The Badgers outhustled and
outshot the Wildcats, hitting 36
of 84 field goal tries for 42.8 per
cent. Northwestern could hit only

Illini Roll, 98-81
CHAMPAIGN - Illinois pulled
away from Purdue in the second
half last night to gain a 98-81
victory over the Boilermakers in
a Big Ten conference basketball
game.
The two teams were tied at
halftime, 39-39, after exchanging

MISERY
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has Zenith 19" All-Channel portables
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662-5671
ELECTRICAL ENGINEERS
PIIYSICISTS
MATHEMATICIANS
Technical representatives
of The MITRE Corporation
will be conducting intervieWs
on campus
MARCH 2
MITRE is chief technical advisor and systems engineer to the Air
Force Electronic Systems Division of the Air Force Systems
Command. In this capacity, we design and develop such global,
computer-based systems as the NORAD Combat Operations
Center and the Back-Up Interceptor Control System. Other com-
mitments: development of a future air traffic control system and
supporting the Defense Communications Agency in the develop-
ment of the National Military Command System.
For the young systems engineer, this is uniquely rewarding work.
You associate with the top men in your field. You work in an
atmosphere that allows you to extend your capabilities profession-
ally and academically.
At MITRE, men trained in single disciplines are encouraged to
grow beyond their original fields of interest. Systems designers
learn to work from an increasingly broad base.
You may work in such diverse areas as information theory, com-
puter design, display techniques and propagation. You may
analyze. You may synthesize. You may deal with systems or in-
dividual components. At thehighest levels, you may have to con-
sider political, economic and social factors ... as well as the avail-
able. and predictable technology.
Requirements: M.S., or Ph.D. in these disciplines - electronics,
physics, mathematics. MITRE is located in pleasant, suburban
Boston and also has facilities in Washington, D. C., Colorado
Springs and Florida. If an interview will be inconvenient, inquiries
may be directed in confidence to College Relations Coordinator,
The MITRE Corporation, Box 208, Dept. 'No. CNA
ARRANGE FOR AN INTERVIEW THROUGH THE PLACEMENT OFFICE.
THE
MITRE

21 of 73 floor shots for a chilly' the lead several times in the first
27.3 per cent. half.

The Wildcats, who whipped Wis-
consin a week ago on their home
floor 76-65, led the first 10 min-
utes, but Badger captain Ken
Barnes popped in a basket to
thrust his teammates ahead 19-18
and they never trailed again.
A pair of sophomores, Joe
Franklin and Mike Carlin, topped
Wisconsin with 16 points apiece.
The Badgers had five players in
double figures, while Northwestern
was led by Ron Kozlicki with 16.

I -.. .

Illinois took the lead at 58-57
with 11:35 to go in the second half
and never relinquished it after,
that.
Purdue's Dave Schellhase gar-
nered 38 points to lead all scorers.
The Illini's Rich Jones, a 6-foot-7
sophomore forward, scored 30 to
lead his team. Don Freeman had
26 for Illinois despite sitting out
14 minutes of the second half with
four fouls.

i
t
i

jim mmmm-- '---m'"---- - - - - - -3- - mm m m m m m mmm mmm
U Iww w w es ww w w w w w w w ww w w w w w s w
' U

i

its 16th- of the season against six er in the first 58 seconds of the N
setbacks. second half and went ahead at i T ED-|
I I
ll Scheliha Hed PHOTO INTERPRETERS :
Russe ,SchellaseHead
* To develop new interpretation rules, procedures, techniques, u
: tools, and equipment.
'8li eaHere's an opportunity to use the training received in the a
S armed forces as well as your college education. HRB-Singer-the I
I acknowledged leader in airborne reconnaissance systems-is pres-
By The Associated Press The remainder of the team is ently engaged in research study programs to develop new recon- *
hitting close to 20 points per man. t naissance and interpretation techniques for military and commer- I
Cazzie Russell of Michigan was On the second team, also com- I cial customers. Enthusiastic and alert people are needed to con-
elected to the AP All-Big Ten duct original research or studies which will improve the quantity u
team for the third straight season, posed of all seniors, are Oliver or speed of data extraction. Openings are available at the Rome,
heading this year's all-senior Darden of Michigan, G e o r g e s New York or State College, Pennsylvania facilities. I
Peeples of Iowa, Michigan State's I Personnel will also be considered for part-time or during
Bill Curtis, and Northwestern's I vacation periods-especially those who are interested in employ- I
Purdue's Dave Schellhase also Jim Pitts, the leading rebounder ment after graduation. I
was elected unanimously, and also in the league with better than a U Benefits for full-time employment include tuition refund *
for the'third straight year. 15 average. : plan, ,liberal employee benefit provisions, and exceptional vaca- *
I i I
JoiingRusella~n Scellase Also on the second squad is the * tion policy. U
Joining RussellandSh h Alsoonther Gophers' Lou Hudson, dropping- In enddescriptiveresume to Personnel Manager, HRB-Singer,
W'ere Don Freeman, who set anGpesLo Huon, drp i Inc., P. 0. Box 60, Science Park, State College, Pennsylvania
all-time Illinois socring record, from his first team spot of a year i
aal-timedIlinoisfferrig recordn* 16801.U
Stan Washington of Michigan ago. Hudson suffered a broken I
State, and Archie Clark of Min- wrist in theearly part of the sea- H RB-SINGER, INC.
son, and was sidelined for nal -I G R
nesotab se month, came ck strong to A SUBSIDIARY OF THE SINGER COMPANY
,This years squad is relativelygarmnth, bsecndamhnrbrl
small, with Russell and Schellhase garner second-team honors, barely I an equal opportunity employer '
being the tallest at 6-5 and 6-4misgaista brh"mmm m"m"""mmmmmmm"m"m"mmm"'"m'

THE GREAT WHITE FATHER
"SAYS:
A few short weeks left to eat at
the old Red's before the bulldozer de-
molishes the era and begins anew.
Enjoy the early hours: Open 6:30
ANM. till 12:57 A.M. except Sundays
when we open at 8:30 A.M.-(Charlie
Brown's mother won't let him get up
any earlier).

- - - -. - -

I

R-0

An Equal Opportunity Employer

I

led

Pioneer in the design and development of command and control
systems, MITRE was chartered in 1958 to serve only the United
State Government. An independent corporation, MITRE is tech-
nical advisor and systems engineer for the Electronic Systems
Division of the Air Force Systems Command, and also serves the
Department of Defense, and the Federal Aviation Agency.

I

A

K*4

2

respectively. Both are averaging x
over 30 points in their race for the
league scoring crown, currently
held by Schellhase.
mm mm m mm m mm mm nmm mmmm
TODAY!!
I E
..* - E
1 F
U I
E I K I DII~iK F
E I xI F c ~l
E.'iliIIK FL AORPC 1 1K
45:

RESEARCH TEST AND DEVELOPMENT LABORATORIES OF THE NAVY
Representatives of five civilian research, test and development laboratories of the Navy located in
Washington, D.C., Maryland and Virginia will visit on March 16, 1966 to interview candidates for
degrees in engineering, mathematics and physical science.
Opportunities for career employment on projects
of world-wide importance
Special provisions for continuing graduate work

David Taylor Model Basin Naval Oceanographic Offic
r u I \MArin-. I knr+nrN lavr'al cnrr ihnra

e
atorv

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