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February 23, 1966 - Image 7

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The Michigan Daily, 1966-02-23

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WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 1966

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE SEVEN

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 1966 TilE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE SEVEN

LLOYD GRAFF

SIJS, Whiff le Bali,
And 'the Great Dilorenzi
- The process of human taxonomy, the categorizing, compart-
mentalizing stereotyping which slobbers over our fellow man's
unique somethingness deserves a sharp thwacking.
The Artist, the Negro, The Social Worker, The Jock, even The
American Woman (Zounds) are the play things of the breeze shooters
and the toys of master nook tuckers like Time, Life, and NBC.
Of course we all categorize. We couldn't converse unless we
did. And we all admit certain pegs are roundish and others are
kind of square and they fit without too much jiggling into
vaguely roundish and squarish holes. And I suppose there are
trapezoidal holes for rather trapezodish people, though the notion
isn't very appealing.
I guess this is why I find it delectably refreshing to find a
guy who is a round rhombus and a square oblong. Peter Dilorenzi-.
Right now he's President of Voice political,,party, the local chapter
of Students for a Democratic Society.
Dilorenzi (this is his one and only name, like Fabian,
Liberace, Passapartout, and Othello) is perhaps the sole would-be
revolutionary who would like to manage the Philadelphia Phillies.
And I am quite certain he's the only SDSer who gets a Christmas
card every December from the Baltimore Colts.
Dilorenzi is a refugee from The Daily sports staff. A Daily
legend has it that on March 30, 1962, he got rather high. This, in
itself, is hardly a Daily first. The problem was that Dilorenzi was
also night editor on March 30th. Let it suffice to say that he wrote
a headline that endures in Daily folklore, "Mother of Paret Comes
to Gotham." The Sports Editor fired him the next day-temporarily.
You see, it is practically impossible to stay mad at Dilorenzi.
He's the most engaging revolutionary you'd ever want to meet, unless
you knock his Baltimore Orioles. Dilorenzi has been known to gasp,
scowl, therl walk out in smoliering contempt if a bad word is
directed at Jerry Adair, the Oriole second baseman.
And besides being the head of Voice, Dilorenzi is one of the
better whiffle ball pitchers in the state. He's the only man ever to
strike me out two straight times in The Daily parking lot, which
attests to his prowess--I believe.
He stands also as the acknowledged champion of Olympic
Hockey, a board game with whirling steel men and a little wooden
puck.
Yes, this is the head of SDS.
He was Instrumental in organizing the first Viet Nam teach-
in, has worked devotedly for CORE, and served as a prime
mover for the Days of Protest late last year.
"Dilorenzi believes in the billiard theory of getting things done.
He gets people angry and watches them bounce off each other,"
says a close friend.
"He's one of the few people in the world who reads New Times,
and I. F. Stone, and then dives into The Sporting News," remarks
another.
Dilorenzi is also probably the foremost fan of John Dickenson
A Carr on this continent, except for maybe Carr's wife. If you've never
heard of him, he writes winding mysteries set in the period of the
French Revolution.
Also a movie buff, at one time he wanted to be a rialto historian.
Really it's hard to envision him ever "settling down" to a sedate,
oirdered life. It would be as out of character as Soupy Sales running
for Governor of Delaware.
Dilorenzi is out of school now, spending full-time on Voice
matters. He talks about going back next year as a grad student
In Sociology or History, but he's equivocal. Honestly dedicated,
. he's sanguine about the prospects of going to jail defending his
beliefs if it ever came to that. In fact he thinks it wouldn't be
bad at all if they just let him read.
This marvelously nutty Italian, from Easton, Pennsylvania,
possesses a mountainous ca'che of sports triva. His grasp of former
Phillies and Orioles is extraordinary.Just ask him who Mary Blaylock
and Frank Zupo (or was it Max) were.: And his knowledge of batting
averages, while not comuter perfect, rates with the better campus
baseball wizards.
Personally, I think thatDilorenzi is cut out for only one job-
to be general manager of a baseball team. He has a genius for making
hypothetical trades of ballplayers that always benefit the Orioles
or Phils. Incidentally, he had Frank Robinson traded to Baltimore
years before the transaction ever took place.

rivin
By CHUCK VETZNER
Acting Sports Editor
The lay-up.
The easiest shot inbasketball
unless you're 6'5" and like to.
dunk. The lay-up is the shot you
just don't miss. Get up a good
fast dribble, take off on one foot,.
and flick the ball right in.
Teams practice it before each'
game. Sometimes they use it once
or twice too.
That's the whole trouble with
this nice easy shot. When some-
.body stands in front of you, wav-
ing his arms, the best thing to do'
is try a jumper. Lay-ups just don't
go.
People have tried to explain
this to Iowa coach Ralph Miller.
But Miller figures if the lay-up is
the easiest way to score, his team
is going to shoot lay-ups.
Waiting Game
He follows this policy with the
determined stubbornness of a
senile grandmother. You just can't
argue with him even if it costs bis
team some games.
Pro-Millerites call it a patterned
offense. That means passing and
waiting until you get a man open
for the nice easy lay-up.
Such tactics don't, always work,
and then Miller is' a man who
ruins a good team by over-coach-
ing it.
Miller over-coached his team
several times this year against the
very worst teams in the Big Ten-
Indiana, Northwestern, Purdue,
and Wisconsin.
His patterned offense has beat-
en such top clubs as Minnesota,
Michigan State, and on Monday
night, Michigan.
Wolverine assistant coach Jim..
Skala saw the Hawkeyes fall to
Purdue, and he had an explana-
tion. "They wouldn't shoot," he
exclaimed. "They had men open
for 15-footers, and they wouldn't
shoot."

Hawkeyes

'Lay-Up'

(

Monday night, Iowa had men
open for ten-footers, and, they
didn't shoot. But they won because
they got the lay-ups instead. In
all, 19 of the 35 Hawkeye field-
goals were scored on drives or
lay-ups.
"They were just a half step
faster than we were," sighed head
coach Dave Strack.
Strack knew Miller was not go-
ing to change his personality for
the Michigan game. Strack knew
t h a t the recalcitrant Miller
wouldn't respond to the critics
clamoring for him to take those
ten foot shots.
What Strack had to do was
make sure there wouldn't be any

lay-ups. His weapon was a 1-2-2
zone defense and the reasoning
was excellent. Purdue used a zone
to defeat the Hawks, and the Wol-
verines had employed one last year
when they shut the gates on Iowa.
The whole purpose of a zone is
to keep the area around the basket
empty. If the zone could fence out
Iowa, there would be no lay-ups.
Snuck Through
Nevertheless, Miller instructed
his players to prod at the shield,
and they met with greater success
than even Miller could have ex-
pected. Ben McGilmer, the sopho-
more from Detroit who replaced
the i neligible Jerry Jones, and
Chris Pervall drove the base line

and scored 46 points between
them. Even more embarrassing,
the Hawks frequently rambled
straight down the lane, invading
the Wolverine alley without the
slightest fear of a beating from
the Michigan bullies.
With just a few minutes re-
maining in the first half, Strack
abandoned the zone and went to
a standard man-to-man, but Iowa,
kept driving away.
Gap Widened
In the second period the Wol-
verines returned to the full court
zone press that had been so suc-
cessful of late. "The press worked
better than anything else," .said
Strack. "We didn't start the game

with it because we figured theyf
were expecting it." Miller, usingt
similar reasoning, had his squadr
drop the full court press they hadf
been using all year.I
Despite the renewed vigor ofe
the defense, Michigan was stillE
never able to catch up. EveryN
time the Wolverines started to
close the gap, Iowa would stretch
the lead
Michigan's final big chance
seemingly occurred when Purvall,
Gary Olson, and George Peeples
fouled out in quick succession with
six minutes left.
But the Iowa bench that pro-
duced McGilmore came up with
Garry Gottshalk and sophs Hus-
ton Breedlove and Dick Agnew.
Instead of closing the gap,
Michigan fell further and further
b a c k. The Wolverines went
through one stretch of making
one out of nine field goals, and
when they clustered around the
boards for a possible rebound,
Iowa sprinted down for a fast
break.
"We didn't play too bad," con-
cluded Strack, "but not as 'well as
we had been. Of course you us-
ually don't when you lose."
The loss cuts Michigan's con-

Ragers
ference lead to only a game, and
the schedule includes a return
match with Iowa and a grand
finale with Michigan State. But
Strack seems more confident than
ever and promises, "We respect
everyone we're going to play, but
we don't intend to lose again."

RACE TIGHTENS UP:
Late MSU Spurt Stops Illini

EAST LANSING (P)-Michigan
State's pressurebasketballde-
fense put the clamps on high-
scoring Illinois last night for a
68-66 Big Ten victory.
The victory brought the Spar-
tans' conference record to 7-3,
one game behind league-leading
Michigan..
Illinois dropped into a third-
place tie with Iowa at 6-4.
All four contenders have four
games remaining.
Illinois entered the game aver-
aging 87 points a game but the
spirited Spartans, paced by seniors
Bill Curtis and Stan Washington
and junior Matt Aitch, were mas-
ters.
The score was tied at 51-51
with 6:40 remaining in the second
half when Aitch hit a follow up
shot putting the Spartans ahead
to stay.
State took a six-point lead 64-58

with 2:56 left. Illinois' Ron Dun-
lap and Don Freeman scored bas-
kets,: but State's John Bailey and
Aitch then hit two free throws.
Tied Six Times
The score was tied six times in
the first half and the lead changed
hands each time. Jim Dawson's
17-foot jump shot with 16 seconds

remaining gave Illinois a 32-31
halftime lead.
Curtis led the Spartans with 23
points, followed by Washington
and Aitch with 17 and 13 respec-
tively.
Freeman paced the Illini with
23 while Rich Jones added 16 and
Dawson 13.

RALPH MILLER

AP POLL:
Wildcats Increase Lead
Wolverines Rated Tenth
By The Associated Press Nebraska to eighth. Michigan re-
The streaking Kentucky Wild- mained in 10th place.
cats show no signs of slowing down The ranking teams won 19 of
and relinquishing their solid lead 20 games last week, and, except
in the Associated Press major- for Michigan, appear to be follow-
college basketball poll. They need ing the same pattern this week.
to win only three more 'games to 'M' Lone Loser
complete an unbeaten regular Among the six teams in the top
season. ten which played Monday night,
Kentucky lifted its record to only the Wolverines lost. They
22-0 Monday night by trouncing~ were beaten by Iowa, 9 1-82.
Mississippi 108-65. The Wildcats Thebvictors in addition to Ken-
play Tennessee this Saturday and tucky were Vanderbilt over Geor-
March 5, and then Tulane in the gia, Kansas over Oklahoma. Ne-
season finale March 7 . braska over Colorado, and Provi-
In the latest poll based on dence over Loyola of New Orleans.

THIRD LOSS FOR DEVILS:
Wake Forest Surprises
Dukel in Overtime, 99-98

WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. P) -.
Bob Leonard's eight points in over-
time and surprise performances
by sophomores David Stroupe and
Paul Crinkley led Wake Forest's
Deacons to a 99-98 basketball up-
set of second-ranked Duke last
night.
Leonard hit two field goals and
three free throws: for eight of
Wake's nine points in the over-
time after the teams ended regu-
lation play tied 90-all in the At-
SCORES
COLLEGE BASKETBALL
Georgetown 107, Seton Hall 93
St. John's (NY) 80, Massachusetts 73
Miami (Ohio) 76, Xavier (Ohio) 72
Valparaiso 69, St. Joseph's (Ind) 63
Wake Forest 99, Duke 98 (ovt)
Wichita 86, Cincinnati 76
Houston 152, Texas Wesleyan 108
'temple 71, Penn 64
Clemson 106, Georgia Tech 9s
Southern Methodist 82, Texas A&M 65
Fairfield 84, Canisius 78 (ovt)
Southern Illinois 69, Oklahoma St. 60
Texas 91, Rice 82
Velaware 72, Lehigh 71 (ovt)
Arkansas 91, Texas Christian 73
NBA
Philadelphia 117, Detroit 112
New York 113, St. Louis 108

lantic Coast Conference game.
Stroupe scored a career high of
24 points, many of them at key
points in the game. When he foul-
ed out, with 1:37 to go,? Crinkley
replaced him and tapped in the
basket that sent the game into
overtime.
The Deacons, who had lost
eight straight to Duke, trailed IM-
11 in the early going but finally
caught the Blue Devils behind
Leonard, Stroupe and Paul Long,
whose 31 points topped Wake For-
est's scoring.

games through last Saturday,
Kentucky drew 38 first-place votes
and 396 points. Fourth-ranked
Chicago Loyola'and seventh-rank-
ed. St. Joseph's of Pennsylvania
were the only other teams named
to the. top position in the ballot-
ing 'by 40 regional experts.
Devils in Second
Duke held second place and
there was no change either in the
next three positions as Texas
Western, Chicago Loyola and Van-
derbilt ranked third, fourth and
fifth, respectively.
Providence's loss to Rhode
Island dropped the Friars three
places to ninth. Kansas climbed to
sixth, St. Joseph's to seventh and

The top 10, with first place votes
in parentheses, season's records
through games of Sat., Feb. 19, and
total points on a 10-9-8-7-6-5-4-3-2-1
basis:
1. Kentucky (38) 22-0 396
2. Dukef 19-2 348
3. Texas Western 20-0 305
4. Chicago Loyola (1) 20-2 264
5. Vanderbilt 20-3 208
6. Kansas 19-3 208
7. St. Joseph's, Pa. (1) 19-4 126
8. Nebraska 18-3 121
9: Providence 20-3 70
10. MICHIGAN 14-6 65
Others receiving votes, listed al-
phabetically: Boston College, Cin-
cinnati, Dayton, Houston, Oklahoma
City, Oregon State, Pennsylvania,
Rhode Island, San Francisco, South
ern California, Syracuse, Virginia
Tech, Western Kentucky, West Vir-
ginia.

MICHIGAN'S CAZZIE RUSSELL DRIVES in and Illinois' Rich
' Jones appears to signal prematurely that Russell's basket is good.
The Illini defeated Michigan in this game but were virtually
eliminated from the Big Ten race last night, losing 68-66 to
Michigan State.

r7

-- I

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERS

PIIYSICISTS

..,

f
I

One of Dilorenzi's favorite gags
trade,"
"What trade," I anxiously query.
"The Cepeda for Banks and
Altman deal," he says.
"Sure," I reply incredulously.
"OK, don't believe me. But it's
true. "
"Really." I respond in rising
tone.
"Cepeda for Banks and Altman."
"Well, it kind of makes sense,
I guess.".
Then Dilorenzi slaps the egg
over my puss by divulging his
ruse.
He's done it to me a dozen
times, and he'll probably get away
with it again. Dilorenzi is so
boyishly, unjadedly convincing.
Haw can you doubt a whiffle ball
pitching, Oriole rooting, mystery
loving, Italo-American, planner of
teach ins?

is to yell "Did you hear the

MATHEMATICIANS

ANNOUNCING: MARCH 13, 20, 27
INTERDISCIPLINARY SEMINAR ON
"GUILT AND RESPONSIBILITY'"
in the writings of MARTIN BUBER
for faculty and graduate students
DR. MARVIN FOX, DEPT. OF PHILOSOPHY, OHIO STATE UNIV.
DR. MANFRED VOGEL, DEPT. OF RELIGION, NORTHWESTERN UNIV.
MRS. CHRISTINE DOWNING, LITERATURE, RUTGERS UNIV.
Lecture 3-4 P.M. (Open to Public) Seminar 4-5 P.M. (Limit: 35 persons)
Registration closes March 6th Registration fee: $1.50
Write Buber Seminar, 602 E. Huron St. or phone NO'8-6881
sponsored by Office of Religious Affairs, Ecumenical Campus Staff,
Hillel Foundation, Newman Center

/111/el

SABBATH SERVICE
Friday, February 25 at 7:15 P.M.
Address by
DR. ROBERT SKLAR
Assistant Professor, History
"THE PARTY OF ART IN CONTEMPORARY CULTURE"
John Planer, Cantor
The Hillel Choir, Mike Robbins, director
Joan Temkin, organist
B'NAI B'RITH HILLEL FOUNDATION
1429 Hill Street All Are Welcome

"7

r

Technical representatives
of The MITRE Corporation
will be conducting interviews
on campus
MARCH 2
MITRE is chief technical advisor and systems engineer to the Air
Force Electronic Systems Division of the Air Force Systems
Command. In this capacity, we design and develop such global,
computer-based systems as the NORAD Combat Operations
Center and the Back-Up Interceptor Control System. Other com-
mitments: development of a future air traffic control system and
supporting the Defense Communications Agency in the develop-
ment of the National Military Command System.
For the young systems engineer, this is uniquely rewarding work.
You associate with the top men in your field. You work in an
atmosphere that allows you to extend your capabilities profession-
ally and academically.
At MITRE, men trained in single disciplines are encouraged to
grow beyond their original fields of interest. Systems designers
learn to work from an increasingly broad base.
You may work in such diverse areas as information theory, com-
puter design, display techniques and propagation. You may
analyze. You may synthesize. You may deal with .systems or in-
dividual components. At the highest levels, you may have to con-
sider political, economic and social factors ... as well as the avail-
able and predictable technology.
Requirements: M.S., or Ph.D. in these disciplines - electronics,
physics, mathematics. MITRE is located in pleasant, suburban
Boston and also has facilities in Washington, D. C., Colorado
Springs and Florida. If an interview will be inconvenient, inquiries
may be directed in confidence to College Relations Coordinator,
The MITRE Corporation, Box 208, Dept. 'No. CNA
ARRANGE FOR AN INTERVIEW THROUGH THE PLACEMENT OFFICE.
THE
MITRE

ENGINEERING OPPORTUNITIES

U

for Seniors and Graduates in

MECHANICAL,
AERONAUTICAL, CHEMICAL
ELECTRICAL,
and METALLURGICAL
ENGINEERING

ENGINEERING MECHANICS
APPLIED MATHEMATICS
PHYSICS and
ENGINEERING PHYSICS
CAMPUS INTERVIEWS

MONDAY, MAR. 7

I Appointments should be made

0

f1

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