100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

February 15, 1966 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-02-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 15, 1966

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

'Parc QVIVVXT

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 15, 1966 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

VAUL ZS LVLIN

'M' II
By HOWARD KOHN
Michigan's "tiger in the tank"
basketball bench, may be ready to
providea burst of power-in addi-
tion to extra mileage.
Unlike the reserves of Caesar's
legions who were called into action
only when the frontline faltered,
the Wolverine reserves have been
getting a workout on the firing
line.
"A bench becomes especially
important to a team at this time
in the season, with six games com
ing up in 16 days. All of our play-
ers are going to have to be good,
not just the starters," explained
,Coach Dave Strack.
No Sweat
In the last couple games, the
Michigan mentor has started sub-
stituting midway .through the first
half, and even Cazzie Russell has
been a non-perspiring spectator at
the final buzzer. True, the point
spread has been averaging 17.5
points, but "the reserves have at
times improved the tempo of the
game."
"I don't think we're hurting our-
selves by putting some of these
boys in," says Strack, whose team's
league-leading 7-1 record reflects
4 either a strong nucleus or a bal-
anced system of attack.
For Michigan this season, those
"balancers, who have been sit-
ting dangerously, inconspicuously
on the wood benches while the
opening lineup took the bows on
the floor before gametime, include
Dennis Bankey, Craig Dill, Jim
Pitts and Dan Brown. The four

eserves
have been worth more than a consec
dozen of Hannibal's elephants to Sagin
Strack's five-man legion. the lea
"We are one complete team and book
I don't particularly think of them "I4
as a 'second string' . . . We have his pls
depended on them and they have not si
come along well," commented offere
Strack. ersi
Four Play Mrros
All four registered in the scor- Mos
ing column in Saturday's record- howe
memb
breaking bludgeoning of Wiscon- hustlii
sin, and Dill finished second to was
Russell in scoring with 18 points. mont
Starting center Jim Myers, who'mom
did pump in 14 himself, was ed an
bothered by a, groin injury, and on e
_-.- since

Drafted

iuently the 6'10" junior from
aw had a chance to swish
ather citrus with his picture-
over-the-shoulder hook.
was, of course, pleased with
ay. Dill has been performing,
pectacularly, but well . .,
d Strack (adding that My-
njury is "not serious but is
ing and nagging.")
t consistent of the reserves,
er, has been the other junior
er of the team - Detroit's
ng Bankey. The 6'1" guard
an official starter for the
of January when John
pson hobbled with a sprain-
kle, and has been alternating
ven terms with the senior
his return.

Sophomore Pitts, who delighted
the crowd last weekend while he
gunned for the shot to put Mich-
igan over the century mark, has
finally recovered from a bout with
tonsilitis. He played guard against
both Indiana and Wisconsin while
Russell roved the front court.
He will be the third returning
letterman next fall, and "depend-
ing upon his own perserverance,
he should have an excellent chance
of making the starting team."
Which means one of this year's
frosh will have a rough battle to
avoid joining the 'bench.'
Not that such a plight cannot
have its rewards. Senior Dan
Brown has been a benchwarmer
for two championship Wolverine

nto S
teams and is still a reserve this
season. However, Strack has been
plugging him in for John Clawson
at forward with "no hesitation" in
the conference games.
"He made an important basket
for us in the Ohio State game and
is a capable corner man."
How does Michigan's depth1
compare to that of the other Big
Ten teams?
Benchers
"I don't feel that our bench is
substantially weaker than any
other 'in the conference, although
I did think before the season that
Iowa had the best eight or nine
players overall . . .," answered
Strack. (The Hawkeyes h a v e
plummeted from a contending po-

ervice

I

pr

sition into the second division.)
He added that second-place
Michigan State "has an adequate
bench. When Stan Washington
fouled out in a recent game, his
replacement led a surge which in-
creased State's winning margin."
Minnesota, the other leading
threat to Michigan's crown, has
at least six experienced personnel.
Paul Presthus, who took over for
Lou Hudson when he broke his
wrist, is now an alternate third
man up front with starters Archie
Clark and Dennis Dvorchek, since
Hudson's return.
But from all indications, Mich-
igan's "tigers" could be the key
determinant to how "smooth" the
ride is for those last six games.

Going to Europe?
FIND OUT HOW!
Come see speakers and movies.

Feb. 17
Michigan Union

7:30 P.M.
Rooms 3 R&S

Free coffee

and donuts

UAC

ELIGIBLE FOR NCAA'S:
Relaymen Qualify, Lead Team at State

By JOHN SUTKUS
The Michigan cindermen were
in some fast company in the
Michigan State Relays, but they
still managed to make a respect-
able showing.
Yearly, the Relays are one of
the biggest college indoor track
meets in the Midwest. This year,
over 450 athletes from 27 mid-
western schools competed. Besides
Big Ten representatives Michi-
gan, Michigan State, Indiana,
Purdue and Northwestern, Big
Eight power Missouri and promi-
nent independents such as Detroit,
Loyola of Chicago, Notre Dame
and Air Force sent representatives.
MSU's Jenison Field House was
all decked out in red, white and
blue bunting and green sawdust
for the occasion.
A crowd of more than 4000 track
fans watched four meet records
and two field house records fall

to the excellent field of cinder-
men.
No team scoring was compiled,
in keeping with the Relays' policy
of helping to develop individuals
for future dual and championship
events.
Despite a lack of first-place
trophies, Coach Don Canham was
pleased with the Wolverines' per-
formance. Especially satisfying
were the performances of the two-
mile and one-mile relay teams.
Both teams qualified for the NCAA
championships in Detroit, March
11 and 12.
Two Mile: Two
The two-mile team placed sec-
ond behind Notre Dame. The Irish
led at the start, but Michigan's
Jim Mercer kept close and by the
time he passed to baton to Ken
Coffin, the Wolverines had the
lead, Coffin opening it to 20 yards.
Then, Elmo Morales took over
and ripped off a 1:54 half mile to

gain the fastest Michigan se
ment, but the Irish closed the go
to only five yards. Notre Dame
Ed Dean took the lead from a:
chorman Cecil Norde after a la
apd steadily pulled away.
Commenting on Norde's finis
Canham said, "He's been sick.
shouldn't have run him." TI
team was clocked in 7:39.9.
Falcons Fly
The mile relay team reeled o
a 3:17.8 timing, finishing hot c
the heels of the Air Force Acad
my.

g- Several outstanding individual
ap Wolverine efforts were sprinkled
e's throughout the meet. Jim Dolan
n- ran the mile segment of the dis-
ap tance medley relay in 4:12.8, Jack
Harvey heaved the shot over 55
h, feet, and Willie Brown sprinted to
I third in the 60-yard dash final.
he Carl Ward won his heat in the
60-yard event, but fell at the fin-
ish, bruising his ankle. He could
ff hardly walk on it and had to
on scratch from the final. But "he
e- will be ready to run this week,"
Canham added.

CRAIG DILL

Michigan Keeps Tenth Spot;
Wildcats Solidly in, First

Although advancing in totalc
points by the virtue of their 120-
102 drubbing of undermannedt
Wisconsin, the Michigan five re-i
mained in tenth place in the As-I
sociated Press' weekly poll ofR
writers.1
With a total of 82 points, the
Wolverines moved within five of
the thrice-beaten Nebraska Corn-
huskers, defeated last week in
action against Oklahoma City.
Number one for the second con-
secutive week, Adolph Rupp's Ken-
tucky fivesome amassed a near
perfect point-total of 416, gar-
nering 40 of the 42 first-place
ballots.
Taking over the top last week
from the Duke Blue Devils, the
Wildcats are now a perfect 19-0,
while the second-ranked Duke
squad is 17-2 following last week's
loss to West Virginia.
In third place, moving up from
fourth last week, is the nation's
only major unbeaten team other
than Kentucky -- Texas Western.
The Miners displaced Loyola of
Chicago, who dropped their second
'TODAY' I
II
1 1 ,
1 1
1 1,
1 ' fk _
1 1
CO U N FRNCIYf RIES
M AT ELAV L IE 1
I I
OLEDTHAMAURGNT a
OUNIVERSITY TOWERS
t 1,23 KS. FLvrDs
, ,i Urrr sr r r r r

of the season to Wichita.
After fourth-place Loyola, the
chart remained the same as last
week's, as Vanderbilt, Providence,
Kansas, St. Joseph's, Nebraska,
and Michigan rounded out the top
ten.
The ToprTen, with first-place
?votes in parentheses, won-lost rec-
ords through Saturday, Feb. 12, and
points on a 10-9-8-7-6-5-4-3-2-1 bas-
is:

conditioned
uf IVE.RS ITY IOW( RS
. Now renting for Aug.
S. UNIVERSITY AVE. & FOREST AVE. PHONE: 761-3565

L.

Cindermen Soar

1. Kentucky (40) 19-0
2. Duke 17-2
3. Texas Western 18-0
4. Chicago Loyola 17-2
5. Vanderbilt 17-3
6. Providence 17-2
7. Kansas 16-3
8. St. Joseph's, Pa. (1) 17-4
9. Nebraska 16-3
10. Michigan 13-5)

416
855
301
247
182
170
169
134
87
82.

POLE VAULT-1. Neihardt (CMU);
2. Seeley (WMU); 3. (tie) Stewart
(MSU) and Beck (Mo). Height -
15'%/" (new meet record).
240-YD. SHUTTLE HURDLE RE-
LAY-I .Michigan State (Jones, Mc-
Roy, Steele, Washington); 2. Cen-
tral Michigan; 3. Western Michigan.
Time-:28.8 (new meet and field
house record).
300-YD. RUN-1. McKenzie (SIU);
2. Weddle (Ind); 3. Gottlieb (WMU).
Time-:31.5.
DISTANCE MEDLEY RELAY-1.
Toronto; 2. Miami (O); 3. Western
Michigan. Time-10:01.
SHOT PUT-i. Woods (SIU); 2.
Crews (Mo); 3. Harvey (M). Dis-
tance-60'11%" (new meet and field
house record).
1000-YD. RUN-1. Newman (AF);
2. Coates (MSU); 3. Dykstra (Mo).
Time-2:13.8 (new meet record).
60-YD. DASH-1. Summers (MSU);
2. Brown, Charles (Mo); 3. Brown,
Willie (M). Time-:06.3.
MILE RUN-1. Boydston (NW);

2. Bair (KSU); 3. Link (MSU). Time
--4:09.5 (new meet record).
SPRINT MEDLEY RELAY-1. Air
Force (Withers, Woddell, Thompson,
Stovall); 2. Drake; 3. Southern Il-
linois. Time-3 :26.5.
70-YD. HIGH HURDLES-1. Wash-
ington (MSU); 2. Jones (MSU); 3.
Steele (MSU). Time-:08.5.
600-YD. RUN--1. O'Connor (Loy);
2. Kneile (Mo); 3. Battistelli (KSU).
Time-1:11.1.
TWO MILE RELAY - 1. Notre
Dame (Dean, Farrell, Small, Spiro);
2. Michigan; 3. Toronto. Time --
7:36.2.
70-YD. LOW HURDLES-1. Wash-
ington (MSU); 2. LeMon (WMU); 3.
Jones (MSU). Time-.07.9.
TWO-MILE RUN-i. Coffey (ND);
2. Sharkey (MSU); 3. Lorandeau
(KSU). Time"9.02.6.
COLLEGE MILE RELAY-1. East-
ern Michigan; 2. Central Michigan;
3. Western Ontario. Time-3:20.8.
UNIVERSITY MILE RELAY - 1.
Aira Force; 2. Michigan; 3. Southern
Illinois, Time--3:17.8.

i

14

I

Ill

i

Also receiving votes, listed alpha-
betically-Bradley, Brigham Young.
Cincinnati, Davidson, Dayton (1),
Houston, Oklahoma City, Oregon
State, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island,
St. John's of N.Y., San Francisco,
Syracuse, UCLA, Utah, Western
Kentucky.

What does the Chicago Tribune want
from University of Michigan?
if, you're good enough.

"o

i

UAC proudly announces the
opening of petitioning for the
General Co-Chairmen of
HOMECOMING '66
SOPH SHOW '66
*Petitions may be picked up in the League
Undergraduate Office or Union Student Offices.

Are you good enough to han-
die up to $500,000 in adver-
tising billings next year?,
As an advertising representative
for the Chicago Tribune, you're
actually an advertising advisor toJ
top businessmen. Youstart out han-
dling $100,000 in yearly billings.
If you're really good,you may boost
your volume as high as half a mil-
lion dollars by the year's end.
Sure, that's lot of money. But
look at the product you're selling:
the Chicago Tribune. Largest full-
size daily paper in the nation, it
carried a total of $85,000,000
worth of advertising last year.

Are you good enough to make
the news staff of the nation's
largest full-size daily paper?

Here'sthe "nerve-center" ofthe Chicago
Tribune. Many famous writers and edi-
tors got their start in this newsroom.
The best ones assume the editorial lead-
ership for which the Tribune is noted.

Are you good enough to win
one of the Tribune's other
specialized job openings for
college graduates?
Big city newspapers are big busi-
ness today. With the largest circu-
lation of any standard-size news-
paper in the U.S. the Tribune
grows.apace with Chicago and the
Midwest.
As one of Chicago's largest busi-
nesses, the Tribune now employs
more than 4,500 men and women
with a multitude of skills. Con-
stant promotions from within
create new openings for such people
as: research analysts and market-
ing experts, advertising artists
and copywriters, public relations
men, engineers and administrative
specialists.
Withsuch awidevarietyof open-
ings, your studies in any field--
accounting, art, economics, Eng-
lish, even dramatics-may qualify
you for a career with the Chicago
Tribune.

i

IL

!1

mmi.

-

A Message for You

from Ann Arbor Bank
For complete student and faculty banking needs see Ann
Arbor Bank. Specialcheck checking accounts, travelers checks,
foreign exchange, letters of credit, and four campus offices
are just a few reasons why Ann Arbor Bank should be your
bank. Stop in at any Ann Arbor Bank office and get acquaint-
ed with alert, accommodating banking.

It may look like a fraternity "bull ses-
sion,' but these Tribune salesmen are
kicking around a new selling idea. Stilt
in their 20's, already decision-makers.
To maintain its leadership, the
Tribune needs young go-getters
who are poised and self-confident,
quick-thinking, imaginative, eager
to earn, learn and win one promo-
tion after another. There's always
more work than you have time for,
but you have a magnificent organ-
ization backing you up. There's the
nation's largest staff of newspaper
research and marketing experts...
plus writers and artists to create
ads for the space you sell.
At the Tribune, the pay, the gen-
erous fringe benefits and the man-

When the Chicago Tribune taps7
you you step right into big-time,
big-city newspaper work as a mem-
ber of a news staff of about 500.
To join the Tribune staff, you
must be good-and have the grades
to prove it. You must be a good
writer and be able to demonstrate
it. You need a nose for news, quick
reactions and the ability to work
under pressure, Most of all, you
should be dedicated to journalistic
excellence and have some ideas of
your own about how to achieve it.
Your very first assignment at the
Chicago Tribune probably will be
a writing job for one of the regular
neighborhood news sections.You'll
earn your way and learn by work-
ing with experienced editors and
veteran reporters. You'll work hard,
sometimes with irregular hours,
to meet hourly deadlines.
Your rewards will reflect your
performance. You can move on to
copy-editing, makeup, feature
writing. You may even make it in-
to top management.
And the pay was never so good
as it is today for bright young

These doors open wide each year for
outstanding college graduates.

U

Back to Top

© 2017 Regents of the University of Michigan