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February 10, 1966 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-02-10

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THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 1966

TIDE -MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 1966 TIlE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE THREE

Humphrey

Visits

Saigon
A ~i!*

Judge Orders Three

Year

Delay in N.Y. Transit Case

To

Spur

Reform

NEW YORK (;P)-A judge rul-
ed yesterday that state law re-

A1

quires city subway and bus work-
ers to wait three years to collect
pay raises they won after a 12-

Michael J. Quill, president of
the Transport Worwers Union, and
eight other union leaders were
jailed for ignoring the injunc-
tion.

By The Associated Press
As Vice-President Hubert Hum-
phrey left yesterday for Saigon'
to spur action on reform pro-.
grams, American air squadrons
stepped up their attacks on North'
and South Viet NAm. At the
same time, the Senate Armed
Services Committee authorized
spending $4.8 billion for the
mounting costs of the fighting in
Viet Nam.
In a statement before his de-
parture, Humphrey said, "Our;
mutual struggle- against the ter-
ror and tyranny of the aggres-
sor will be matched by a vigor-'
ous war against the age old ene-
mies of disease, hunger ,and so-,
cial and economic deprivation."
Flying with him were South'
Vietnamese Premier Nguyen Cao
Ky and Chief of State Nguyen
Van Thieu, who concluded talks
here Tuesday with President
Johnson, and various American
officials, including presidential en-!
voy W. Averell Harriman.
Humphrey's mission will be to,
begin implementation of a politi-
cal, social and economic program
outlined Tuesday in the Declar-
ation of Honolulu.
"We are determined to imple-
ment the aims of the declara-
tion," he said, "and we shall take
immediate and continuing action
as partners with the government
and the people of South Viet
Nam to achieve these objectives."
Funds Authorized
In Washington a $4.8-billion
spending authorization for the
mounting costs of Viet Nam won
the unanimous approval yesterday
of the Senate Armed Services
Committee.
The $4.8 billion is part of the
$12.8 billion in military and eco-
- nomic spending Johnson request-
ed to bolster Viet Nam operations.
It includes: $3.4 billion for air-
Splanes,helicopters, missiles and
similar hardware; $1.2 billion for
building ports ,airfields and other
defense facilities in Viet Nam;
and $152 million for research and
development.
Both the Senate and House
t must approve theauthorization
. before actual funds are approv-
ed later in a separate bill.

day strike last month. Suit
Supreme Court Justice Irving H. Saypol's decision came in a
mese regulars and hard-core Viet Saypol called the settlement that suit brought by a Queens lawyer,
Cong regiments from the central ended the crippling strike "ran- George Weinstein, who sought to
coast was reflected in casualties som extorted from eight million restrain the payment of the pay
announced by the U.S. military citizens." increases, on the basis of the
command bHe said it was clear that the Condon-Wadlin Act.,
c state law forbidding strikes by The judge said Weinstein had a
A spokesman said Communist public employes requires that re- clear case for relief, but that he
losses soared to 1,541 killed and instated strikers must be refused couldn't grant him a summary
245 capturcd, up from 408 killed a pay raise for three years. judgment until he allowed the
and 56 captured in the previous Justice Saypol said it wasmTransit Authority and the New
week, and the kill ratio favored K utc aplsidi a rni utoiyadteNw
the allied forces 5.2 to 1. craven servility" to grant pay in-
ta lie drc es wr.2 89tko1.d creases to illegal strikers, and "if
American losses were 89 killed, repnil3fiilscno tn i A
499 wounded .and eight missing in > responsible officials cannot stand
499wondd ad igt mssnginup in firm resistance, the court 117 a r t, c
action. That compared with 57 gills"istance, the court 0
killed, 281 wounded and 11 miss- AFL-CIO Replies
ing in the week of Jan. 23-29. Leaders of the AFL-CIO Trans-
The U.S. death roll was approach- port Workers Union promptly is- By The Associated Press
ing the 2000 mark. The Pentagon sued a statement saying they KUWAIT-British forces in the
announced last week the total was would insist that the Transit Au- Muscat and Oman Sultanate have
1,902 as of Jan. 31. thority and the mayor live up tofoiled anattempted coup d'etat,
Operation Double Eagle the agreement. according to reports yesterday.
Casu1alties amon S th i t ._t eorsysedy

York City Civil Service Commis-
sion 10 days to file answers.
Meantime, he forbade payment
of the pay increases pending fin-
al determination of Weinstein's
suit.
. Controversial Act
The Condon-Wadlin Act, pass-
ed in 1947, has been the subject
of hot political debate, and has
rarely been invoked because of
the harshness of the penalties.
For a two-year period, the pen-
alties were changed to require de-
duction of two days' pay for each
day a reinstated employe was on
strike.
SRoundup'
United Klans said yesterday there
has been a change of heart in
the Klan--at least in Alabama-
and it will now cooperate with
the House Committee, on Un-
American Activities.
Robert Creel, 35, of Linden,
Ala., until recently the state lead-
er, said he decided to testify
freely at the committee's KIe.:!
hearings because Klan members
now "really wanted someone to
come up here and defend them."
Creel was the second top Ala-
bama Klan functionary to answer
the committee questions without
pleading the Fifth Amendment
privilege against possible self-in-
crimination.
WASHINGTON - Sen. Wayne
Morse (D-Ore), a critic of United
States=Latin American policy, held
up action yesterday on the nomi-
nation of Jack Hood Vaughn to be
director of the Peace Corps.
As assistant secretary for in-
ter-American affairs, Vaughn was
one of the top officials involved
when President Johnson decided
to rush troops to the bloody re-
volt in the Dominican Republic
last year.

-Associated Press

VICE PRESIDENT HUBERT HUMPHREY, flanked by South Viet Nam Chief of State Nguyen Van
Thieu (left) and Premier Nguyen Cao Ky (right) prepares to leave Honolulu for Saigon along with the
Vietnamese officials to begin political, social, and economic programs formulated at this week's Ha-
waii conference. *
DOMINICAN REPUBLIC:
Police with Guns, Tear Gas
Stop.Student Demonstrat ions

vauuuis mng mum iet
Nam's armed forces were down
slightly-184 killed and 121 miss-'
ing. Their losses of the previous7
week were 209 killed and 1851
missing. No figures were given
for either Vietnamese or Viet;
Cong wounded.
The Marines' Operation Double
Eagle was the northern and leastE
productive element in the coastal
offensive. The helicopter base be-E
low Quan Ngai, 330 miles north-
east of Saigon,rhad been plagued
by pot shots from its perimeterf
since the operation started Jan.,
28.
The patrol killed three in a
brisk fight, then was pinned down
and called for -help. Jet fighter-t
bombers poured bombs on the area
for two hours.1
Fighter planes hit the huts withj
cannon shells and rockets. Then
155mm artillery joined. By 3 p.m.1
the Viet Cong were silenced. The
Marines went in and wound 27t
bodies.

The 34,400 workers were grant-
ed across-the-board increases of
4 per cent retroactive to Jan. 1,
another 4 per cent next Jan. 1,
and another 7 per cent on July 1,
1967. The total cost was estimat-
ed variously at $52 to $70 million
over two years. None of the in-,
crease has yet been paid, since!
the union members ratified thel
contract only last weekend.
Strike Called
The strike, the first city wide
trans.it shutdown in the city's his-
tory, was called a few hours after
Mayor John V. Lindsay took of-
fice on Jan. 1.
The Transit Authority invoked
the state's Condon-Wadlin Act,
which forbids strikes by public
employes, to obtain an injunc-
tion against the strike.

.

They said insurgents occupied
the British base at Beyt Al Fa-
laj for two hours and captured
British troops and officers and
that British reinforcements rush-
ed from a nearby camp to arrest
the ringleaders.
WASHINGTON - The Senate
sent to President Johnson yester-
day a bill to restrict the powers
of the Justice Department to bring
antitrust suits against bank mer-
gers.
The final version of the measure
exempts three banks from anti-
trust proceedings brought by the
government. The Senate bill would
have exempted six banks.
* * *
WASHINGTON The former
grand dragon of the Alabama

The Transit Authority had no The , reports said the alleged
immediate comment. There is no plotters were mercenaries of the
doubt Saypol's opinion -will be ap- Sultanate army recruited from the
pealed. The Supreme Court in naturalized Indian community,
New York is a trial court. originally from Hyderabad, India.

SANTO DOMINGO WP)-Police
broke up a demonstration outside
the National Palace with gunfire
and tear gas yesterday, and offi-
cials said two persons were killed
and 28 others, including five girls,
wounded.
The incident touched off a wave
of disorders in the downtown area
that quieted at noon and started
up again in the afternoon. The
rioters set fire to a station wagon
belonging to the UN representative
here. The Dominican driver was
reported beaten up.
Many of the injdred were hurt

scrambling over walls to get out
of the line of fire.
Anti-U.S. Protest
Most of the estimated 600 dem-
onstrators were high school and
grammar school boys and girls.
They had called the demonstra-
tion ostensibly to demand that the
government restore financial as-
sistance to the University of Santo
Domingo. But the demonstration
turned into an anti-United States
protest. One large placard said,
"Go home, Yankees."
Capt. German Perez Montas, in
charge of the police detail, said

the youths provoked the shooting
by throwing rocks at police. The
shooting broke out as one group
of youths unfurled an American
flag and began to burn it.
Montas claimed some of the
youths were armed. A military
spokesman at the National Palace
said authorities had been tipped
before the demonstration that
some of the youths were armed
One of the wounded was a police
officer who was shot in the leg.

I

mm

YES REBECCA, THERE IS

KOSHER CORNED BEEF IN ANN ARBOR

ALSO SMOKED HAM

0 DANISH PASTRY * GOOD HOT COFFEE AND TEAS

Texas Federal Court Rules
Poll Tax Unconstitutional

committee Favors Bill
The spokesman said the inter- All 17 members of the commit-
American peace force was alerted tee were recorded in favor of the
ahead of the demonstration but bill although one senator sharply
took no part in the action except questioned American policy in Viet
to patrol streets around the palace Nam.
after the youths dispersed. In Viet Nam the fighting con-
Protest jtinues.
Immediately after the shooting, United States Marines, bombers
youth gangs ranged the downtown and artillery yesterday killed 27
streets, shouting "Strike! Strike!" Viet Cong near a helicopter base
overturned garbage cans and tried of the Leathernecks' Operation
to throw up street barricades. One Double Eagle 20 miles south of
auto, reportedly that of a diplo- Quang Ngai City. One Marine was
mat, was set afire. wounded.

THURSDAY: 8-12 P.M.

COFFEE 0 MUSIC 0 TV (BATMAN?)

i TALK * 25c COVER

"QUIET TIME"

FRIDAY AND SATURDAY:

8:30-12: P.M.

QB FRANKE<

AUSTIN OP)-A three-judge fed-
eral court rules Texas' 64-year-
old poll tax voting requirement
unconstitutional yesterday throw-
ing doubt on 1966 voter registra-
tion and possibly setting up a
special legislative session.

certain that higher federal courts
will be asked to stay the order.

Also:
Circuit
Federal
Spears.

signing the opinion were
Judge John R. Brown and
District Judge Adrian

The p-
an army
ago to cu
versityi

rotest was in reaction to
decision several months
ut off finances to the uni-
in order to investigate
of misappropriation of
he charge was part of a
between factions at the
y.

American air squadrons step-
ped up their attacks both north
and south of the border as ground
action generally slacked.
Casualties
Bloody fighting last week in the
offensive of American and allied
forces that swept North Vietna-

WILL PLAY:

GUITAR * BANJO * HARMONICA

SINGING (AMONG OTHERS):

"TALKING STUDENT REACTIONARY CHICKEN BLUES"

eaThe Texas suit was filed the charges
Deadline xfor payment of pol same week as similar actions chal- funds. T
taxes for the 1966 primary and lenging the Mississippi and Ala- disputex
general elections was Jan. 31. bama poll tax requirements. universit
Party primaries are set for May
7. Monday was the filing dead-
line for candidates.
The court gave the state 14 days
to ask the 5th United States Cir-
cuit Court of Appeals or the U.S.
Supreme Court to stay the order.
congressional instructions con-R E EI
tained in the 1965 Voting Rights
Act. The suit alleged the require-
ment discriminates against Ne-
groes.
Thrbryo h t ..CrThe opinion, by Judge 'Homner i -
b 1 t .e TUDC-NT
cuit of Appeals, said the poll tax
"as a precondition to voting must
fall as an unjustified restriction 1 215 S. UNIVERSITY
of one of the most basic rights
guaranteed by the due process Right ne
clause."
A source in the Texas attorney
general's office said it is almost

I

'""

THE

LIE

BOOKS

1421 HILL STREET

ONE DOLLAR INCLUDES ALL FOOD AND DRINK

I

BOOK SERVICE

I

761-0700

I

xt to University Towers

I

SALE
LAST THREE DAYS
THURS., FRI. & SAT.
tasseled or Italian-style calfskin
HANDSEWN LOAFERS

An

Open Invitation

Il

to all DAILY staff members:
(Particularly Steve Wildstrom and other aspiring freshmen)
GARGOYLE invites those Dailyites

The all-time favorite classic casuals,
now specially priced. Your choice

of two popular styles:

who feel they can put out better

antique brown tasseled slipon,

or the bronze wax, brownr1

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